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                    [post_content] => Content writing topics

Are you at a loss for content writing topics for your blog? There are plenty of evergreen topics that suit just about any blog. Read on to find out.

1. Advice and Opinion Pieces

Life advice can be a great way to drive readership up, especially if you've cultivated a following based on opinion pieces. Posts like these give you a chance to form an intimate connection with your readers by providing solutions to their problems. You could talk about anything that relates to your niche. The best thing about advice is that it doesn't require much substantiation, so instead of backing everything up with data, you just have to sit down and think with an open mind. The second best thing, meanwhile, is that advice like this doesn't get old, especially if you’re coming from a place of authority. While things of a time-sensitive nature, such as tech reviews and current events, get dated quickly, the way life works changes very slowly in comparison. So while a two-year-old review of a phone won't be relevant at all anymore, life advice from six years ago will be worth just as much to one of your newer readers.

2. Anecdotal Topics, Drawing from Personal Experience

Similarly to the previous entry, this one relies on the social capital that people associate with your brand name. They'll want to know what you've been doing with your life and the things that have helped shape you into who you are now. Writing about anecdotes from your life allows you to turn journal entries into blog posts. You don't have to read anything, you don't have to premeditate too much either. You just think of an event and let the words go flow. As with life advice, posts like these allow you to develop your writing style, adding and subtracting traits that will eventually help your readers truly identify with that style and brand voice. Since you're also talking about your own experiences here, you're also getting the chance to strike a chord with your audience in a way that few other things can. Giving people a window into yourself helps them connect to your writing, perhaps even relate to it, which is a great way to ensure that they keep coming back to your site for more. Again, because this event is specific to you, the written content will be too, and you don't have to worry about putting your own spin on things or trying to distinguish yourself from everyone else out there. It just comes with the territory by default. Your content writing efforts won't ever get dated because it's an event from your life, and your take on it. As long as you're smart about how you leverage your opinion for your specific audience, people will always be able to find worth in the post, even if the event itself becomes obscure overtime. If you've got the perfect anecdote, but you just can't find the right words to do justice to it, consider tagging us in. Our blog writers have helped many prominent bloggers structure their content to deliver the best possible experience to their readers while also staying true to the essence of the event

3. Focus on Local Events and Attractions

writing about local events If your business has a local element to it, whereby you’re providing services within a geographical area, covering local events or places is a great way to engage potential customers. Every big city's got its own highlights, and you can take a visit to any easily identifiable hotspot and write about it to let your audience know what it's like and what you thought of it. Bonus points if the attraction you're discussing is unique to your locality. If you don't live in a big city and there's not much going on around your town, you can instead foucs on an event and subsequently pivot to a conversation about what’s happening where you are. If you're an avid traveler, blogging about the destinations, your visit, and the attractions within those destinations can be a great source of fresh content - especially if you can adequately capture the essence of that experience and explain it through your words. People are all about secondhand experiences – some might say a desire to live vicariously through others is what got blogging to really take off in the first place.

4. Write About Prevailing Social Issues

This is another type of opinion piece, but it deserves its own entry because it doesn't fall into any other categories. You can write about what you consider an "issue of our time", like climate change, problems relating to modernization and modernized societies, income and gender disparity, and many others. You can pick up any one of these issues and try to paint a clearer picture of them for your audience while also giving your own opinion as well. Tread the line carefully, though. Some topics can carry social importance, so adopting too radical a view may alienate some members of your audience. There's one of two ways to tackle such cases. Its best to adopt a more neutral standpoint that outlines mainstream arguments on either side, but you can also adopt a more candid approach. At the end of the day, it's all about the kind of persona you've built through your blog and how you wish to express yourself. Hot topics do draw big crowds, and your content writing will do well to tap into this.

5. Discuss the Journey of Learning a Particular Skill

blog writing about learning craftsmanship Some businesses, particularly those that have to do with craftsmanship, can use their blog posts to discuss the journey one of their talented professionals took in the pursuit of their craft. If you're a digital agency, you could have a piece written about one of your most senior graphic designers. If you're an independent blogger, you could write about a skill you'd learnt personally. Talk about what motivated you to start, how you developed that interest, and how much you've learnt up till now. Insightful, informative topics covered in a manner that serves to educate your audience are the perfect way for a blog to put out content that helps enrich an audience member's life. That's attention captured, and a reader who'll be returning to your blog to check up on updates in the future. Granted, the journey of learning the skill, or the expertise that goes into providing a particular skill, may become outdated overtime. If it does, you can discussthe evolution of your own craft and the differences between then and now.

6. Write a Fictional Anecdote

Generally, a blog is not fictitious. If anything, a blog is as far removed from fiction as it could be, since blogs deal with aspects of day-to-day life, experience-based accounts from real people. However, a great way to illustrate some abstract point, or demonstrate perspective, is to use a fictional event as the vehicle for it. A narrative is a great way to get readers hooked, and a fictional one is all the better. Rather than typing out your views, why not spin a story between two invented characters that sheds light on the merits of those views. This type of piece might suit some blogs better than others. Depending on how much you enjoy fiction, you could even make a fictional anecdote a regular part of your weekly or monthly offering. Even commercial websites could have a weekly section where the company mascot discusses the latest additions to their product catalogue.

7. Revisit Past Posts That Were Popular

Value added content When you've constantly been churning out content, you've likely revisited the same subject multiple times. Even if yours is a general-purpose blog that, for example, regularly comes up with lists of popular products in different eCommerce marketplaces. Any blog will have callbacks to content that was published earlier. By discussing pieces that received a lot of attention when they were first published, you let newer members of your audience know what they had to offer. In doing so, you're also allowing yourself to hook them with any one of your most popular titles. This strategy lets you capitalize on things that have already worked for you, is what we're saying. But it's about more than just that. If you're talking about technical content, a review of a past article could very well span an article in itself. You could discuss developments since the previous piece was written and address the technical shortcomings of the previous content. In doing so, you show your audience just how dedicated you are to your particular domain and also the depth of your knowledge within that domain. Based on our years of experience writing listicles for various blogs in various domains, we can tell you that a list of the best articles from the past year can be a great way to wrap up a year of great content, and it might just end up being your most popular piece to start off the next. If you'd like, we could even write it for you.

8. Share Your Opinion On Another Person's Opinion (or a Fresh Development).

Pieces like these are great for both establishing the personality of your brand as well as capitalizing on what's already been put out there. Don't forget to take advantage of what we call the trickle-down effect of popular content. If any popular content creator, policymaker, or celebrity comes out with an opinion that gets people talking, you can discuss those opinions for some pretty relevant press. Speaking of relevance, it plays a key role in driving the popularity of such a post. You've got to have a finger on the pulseof current affairs to benefit from pieces like these the most since they tend to have a very short period between having nothing out there regarding the event and being completely saturated with very similar content. For someone running a blog on politics, this can mean competing with other prominent politics and news blogs to be the first on the scene. If you feel up to it, you can even use articles like these to respond to the opinions discussed in the media you're covering. You let your audience know your take on a particular topic, ensuring that everything you're releasing yourself is wholly original. The best part is that in today's day and age, there's a lot of newsworthy developments constantly occurring, so you're not strapped for source material in the slightest. Of course, when you're covering something that's very recent, you can't really predict how much public interest a story will attract. Try to look for big names or popular people. If you're writing a finance blog,you can definitely do a piece on Apple CEO Tim Cook's new salary package and discuss developments in the company (and improvements in profit) since he took the helm.

To Conclude

That was our list of 8 timeless content writing topics. If you'd like to know more about value-added content, find out here. If you'd like to know more about our services and how we can help you revamp your content portfolio, click here to send in an inquiry.

Are your listicles not getting enough traffic?

Let our team of article writers create content that gets your results. [rfp_banner_form formnum="1"]
[post_title] => 8 Timeless Content Writing Topics for Your Blog [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-timeless-content-writing-topics-for-your-blog [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 11:06:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 15:06:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2656 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2646 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-25 09:41:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-25 13:41:52 [post_content] => Rules for writing great articles Writing great articles is not a skill you can learn overnight. It may not be something you are born with, but it is definitely something you can master by putting in the hard work. It takes writers years to hone their craft, and even then, they cannot achieve perfection. In fact, it won't be wrong to say there is no such thing as perfect writing. Everyone has a unique way of expressing their thoughts and beliefs. What matters is how their words resonate with others. A good article can educate people about a new idea, whereas a great article can change minds and encourage people to take action. Whether it is something as simple as clicking on a link and making a purchase or something as complex as adopting a new lifestyle, powerful writing carries a lot of weight and is worthy of respect. If you are looking to improve your article writing skills, learning these rules can be a valuable addition to your arsenal.

Rule 1: Know Your Target Audience

Before you put pen to paper – figuratively, of course – you should ask yourself who you're writing for. Now, most people will say they write for themselves. This is often the correct answer because we're our own biggest critics. Nevertheless, whether you are writing an article for affiliate marketing or working on a magazine article, the first thing you need to do is determine your audience. If you write for a pharmaceutical company or a law firm, you must already have a clear idea of who will be reading your copy. However, if you are an employee at a content marketing firm or work as a freelancer, you may have to do a little research to create a reader profile. It will help you understand their interests and motivation to click on your post. You can start by asking yourself the following questions:
  • Who will read this article?
  • Why would they read this article?
  • What will this article do for them?
Once you have found the answer to these queries, you can get a step closer to writing great articles. Try and learn about the factors that may excite your readers and the things that may not sit well with them. Doing so will help you figure out how you can get your audience to see your point of view or buy what you're selling. However, if you want to grow as a writer, don't limit yourself to an ideal audience. Think about other people who may find your article exciting or may connect with it on an emotional level.

Are your listicles not getting enough traffic?

Let our team of article writers create content that gets your results. [rfp_banner_form formnum="1"]

Rule 2: Research, Research, Research

It is always a good idea to write on topics you are passionate about. Be it your love for abstract art or your interest in marine biology, try writing about things that bring you joy. Alternatively, if you have a strong but unfavorable opinion about something, your personal feelings will undoubtedly add some substance to your writing – as long as you don't make your post sound too biased. However, no matter how much you know about a particular idea, make sure to conduct in-depth research before creating an outline for your piece. Read as much as you can. Learn about the history and background of the topic and how others around the world may have perceived it. Many writers allot a specific time frame for their research. In theory, it may work. But depending on what you're writing and who you're writing for, it may not be a good idea to limit your research process to a few minutes. In addition, don't cut any corners. Poor research is among the leading reasons most articles fall flat. On the other hand, good research helps us build our knowledge and facilitates learning. It also makes us more confident in our writing while nourishing our minds. Your research can make or break the article. If you want your words to make an impact, back up your arguments with facts and figures.

Rule 3: Grab the Reader's Interest

Once a person clicks on your article, you merely have seconds to make an impression. Since your title is the first thing a reader sees after opening your post, you must take extra care to make it compelling and interesting. Ideally, your main heading should convey what your article is about without divulging too much. Sound confusing? Well, your title should be an accurate representation of what the reader will find in the content body. However, it should also create an aura of mystique without being misleading. The next thing you should write a short and concise introductory paragraph to draw in your readers. A large chunk of text right at the beginning of an article may distract the reader. Worst case scenario, it may even stop them from reading any further. Therefore, it is pertinent to keep your opening short and attention-grabbing. It doesn't have to be something extraordinary. But it should at least capture the interest of your audience and encourage them to read what you have to say. Consider keeping your intro limited to two or three short sentences. It can even be a one-liner, depending on how well you can craft it. If your words are easy to scan and provide value, there is a good chance your reader will also make an effort to explore the article. Tips for writing articles

Rule 4: Make Your Article Visually Appealing

One of the most significant rules of writing great articles is making them visually appealing. You can create an element of interest by adding stunning photos and informative videos to your content. Moreover, try to incorporate well-explained charts and intriguing infographics wherever you can in your post. Also, if you come across a graphic that is relevant to your article but seems complex, consider taking some time to explain it to your audience patiently. You can also create customized images to make your piece look more professional. It will also help break up the bulky wall of text. Most brands invest extensively to procure graphic designers to develop valuable marketing content. Another way to make your article more attractive is by writing shorter paragraphs. Negative space in between the short paragraphs can help break the visual clutter. It allows your audience to read and digest each point before moving on to the next one. Here are some more ways you can make your pieces more reader-friendly.
  • Cascading subheadings
  • Bold and italicized words
  • Hyperlinks
  • Bullet points
  • Embeds
These factors will breathe a new life into your articles and motivate your readers to spend more time on them. Also, once you are done with writing articles, don't forget to edit and proofread them. Our years of experience in this field have made us pros at writing content for your site. For more information, please feel free to give us a call.

Rule 5: Add Substance to Your Articles

How many times have you found an article on your newsfeed that had a fantastic title but didn't have any substance? Unfortunately, it happens a lot. These click-bait articles are usually packaged as something worthwhile. However, they rarely tell you anything new or valuable. Although these posts manage to fulfil their target by getting more clicks, they leave the readers frustrated and unsatisfied – which is the exact opposite of what you should aim for. After all, one of the most important rulesforwriting great articles is never to leave the reader dissatisfied or craving more. If you want to improve your article writing skills, aim to add value to your words. It should provide new information or a fresh perspective by viewing the topic from a unique angle. Instead of barely scratching the surface, take a deep dive into the subject and look for ideas that require a detailed and nuanced discussion. Your content should solve problems and present solutions. It should connect with people on a deeper level and stimulate their imagination. Creating value-added content will encourage your readers to visit your piece over and over again. Meanwhile, a shallow article may stop them from ever making that effort again. Moreover, if you have a strong opinion, don't be afraid to share it with the world. However, please keep yourself open to criticism and be gracious with the feedback you receive. After all, your readers have a right to agree or disagree with your words.

Rule 6: Don't Water Down Your Words

Want to write with conviction? Don't let your fears hold you back. More often than not, the fear of judgment and criticism refrain writers from reaching their full potential. It is easy to develop a mindset where you don't want to displease your editor or write something that your audience may not fully agree with. As a result, you start using soft language and adopt a pacifying tone. In some instances, it might work in your favor. However, in most cases, it makes your writing look watered down and ineffective. Your message may even get lost in translation if you spend too much energy on creating a perfect post that keeps everyone happy. Therefore, the next time you write an article and have the nagging fear of "what if they don't like it," please immediately push aside those negative thoughts. While it is essential to make sure your words don't spread misinformation, you must not let the fear of disagreement hold you captive. If you believe in a specific cause or an idea, write about it without entertaining any second thoughts. You can't please everyone. It would help if you accepted that there would be times when your message will not resonate with the readers, and that's completely fine. Receiving a negative comment or a harsh criticism may put you in a bad mood for a few hours. But don't let it stop you from writing articles that can add value.

Summing Up the Rules for Writing Great Articles

Writers never stop learning and growing. Hence there is no set formula that will enable you to produce brilliant content. Nevertheless, a few important rules of writing articles can set you on a path to success and help you create content that will stand the test of time. The rules include learning about your target audience, conducting in-depth research, and reeling in the reader with your compelling headline. Moreover, your article must have bullet points, images, graphics, and other visual elements to increase reader engagement. You can also add substance to your articles by asking the right questions and providing the readers with the correct answers. In addition, make sure you write with conviction and never water down your words due to fear of criticism. If you are interested in our article writing service, please drop us an email today. Our talented writers are experienced in all niches and can help you grow your business and reach a larger market segment. [post_title] => 6 Rules for Writing Great Articles [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 6-rules-for-writing-great-articles [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 10:16:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 14:16:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2646 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2643 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-19 08:57:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-19 12:57:30 [post_content] => White Paper writing What is a white paper, and why has this inbound marketing channel become such a key part of online marketing strategies for businesses. Well for one, it is a deep-dive form of content that makes use of reliable resources and case studies with the purpose to educate readers regarding a particular topic. Such content pieces are great for businesses to present themselves as leading experts in their fields and attract other experts and customers to their products or services. Writing and formatting a white paper is in many ways similar to writing an eBook, with the only difference being that whitepaper writing requires a lot more research and knowledge on the given subject. Whitepaper writing requires dedication and a commitment to producing content that is unparalleled. Doing this in one day is a Herculean task best left to experts. This is where our white paper writing service comes in. With a team of expert white paper writers with diverse expertise, you can rest assured; we’ll deliver well above expectations.

Writing a White Paper Quickly

White paper writing 2 The initial part is the hardest mainly because of a load of information at your disposal. Getting lost in this information is highly likely and presenting findings and data without following a narrative is even more so. Luckily, with our tips and tricks, you’ll find the going easier.

1. Topic Selection

When it comes to topic selection, writing on any industry-relevant subject is not a good idea. You need to understand what your audience will connect with the most and how your qualifications come into play. Additionally, it would also help if you chose a topic that was only briefly covered by others. You can also network with experts within your organization or use other crowdsourcing techniques to have a better command of the subject. If you want your paper to get featured on other websites or SERPs, you should focus on creating a unique paper and filling a gap within the content already available. One great way to select a topic is by starting an online poll. Polls will help you get an idea of what your readers are interested in while also getting them excited for an upcoming paper.

2. Target Audience

Your target audience will determine the kind of tone, voice, and research that will be required for the paper. For example, if the purpose of your paper is to attract B2B customers, then perhaps adding technical jargon will not be a problem. However, if your target audience is not well-versed in the subject, you may need to take a different approach. Additionally, you should also focus on relevant keywords and the platforms where the audience will read your content. Choosing specific platforms will also help later on when you’re outlining and formatting the paper.

3. Intro and Conclusion

Why should your readers get excited about reading the paper? The introduction should include a brief description of what the paper includes and why readers will benefit from it. Most readers decide whether they’ll read an entire paper after reading the introduction. So, make sure to grab their attention and tell them why they should continue reading. Address the value of information and the benefits of your paper early on. The conclusion will help readers make a final decision about the entire paper. This section is where you can market the company’s products or services and persuade the audience to take a specific action. Adding business details and a CTA is best left for the outro of the paper.

4. Useful Information

You might see a paper as a perfect opportunity to promote your business and its products or services. However, it'll be best not to forget that the whitepaper's main purpose is to provide useful information and increase your readers’ knowledge. Additionally, this is also your chance to present yourself as a trustworthy industry leader, and a salesy paper will not be sufficient to do that. Use reliable sources, data, and stats and provide expert opinions on them instead of mere advertisements.

5. Keep Building on First Draft

You should draft several copies of the paper down the line to ensure no useful information was left out. You can keep updating the white paper and improving on it even after the first draft is out. One great way to do this is to write several copies and take a fresh outlook each time. You can also have other experts or professionals within the organization give it a read to spot any errors in the document.

6. Grabbing the Readers’ Attention

The technicalities and formalities included in writing a paper can make the tone of it extremely dull. However, instead of focusing on numbers and statistics, you should try adding more value with a perfectly flowing conversation. Keeping your readers’ attention from beginning till the end in a detailed and thorough paper might be difficult. However, as long as you follow the above-mentioned tips, you’ll be able to write a compelling copy.

Formatting a Whitepaper

Formatting a whitepaper When you’re formatting a whitepaper, you should remember to include an easy-to-read and clear title page. The title page will include the subject of the paper, names of experts who have helped create the document, publication date, and author name[s]. You should also divide your paper into headings, subheadings, and sections. This will help you keep your paper organized and provide a better reading experience. Typically, H1 and H2 headings are used in a paper for headings and subheadings, respectively. It’s also pertinent to note that not all pages of your paper need to be text-heavy. You can present highlights, critical details, and takeaways in a separate section of the document. Using colours will also help readers to find important chunks of information. However, remember not to use red, as red is mostly associated with edits in a file. Easy one-pages can also be used for a summary of the text-heavy sections of your paper. Finally, you should also ensure that your paper feels and looks consistent throughout. Typography, colours, and visuals will play an important role in shaping the readers' experience, so it’s also important to give special attention to such elements. The following are some important sections of a typical white paper:
  • Title
  • Abstract
  • Problem statement
  • Background
  • Solution
  • Conclusion
  • References

White Paper Mistakes to Avoid

Whitepaper mistakes to avoid Since white paper includes a lot of research and analysis, it’s always important to keep in mind the mistakes you’re likely to make and should avoid. Keeping this list in front of you will help you focus on the proper direction for the paper while avoiding mistakes that can lead to a poor reading experience for your audience. Let’s take a look at some common paper writing mistakes you should avoid at all costs:
  • Not conducting adequate research.
  • Making it sound like a sales pitch.
  • Not following a narrative or a story.
  • Creating a bad design for the paper.
  • Not providing relevant examples or supporting your arguments.
  • Making last-minute changes.

Types of Whitepapers for Businesses

Contrary to popular belief, this type of content writing is not new. The term was first used in 1922, when the British Government published the Churchill White Paper of 1922. A white paper, if well-written- will give your company a competitive edge and present you with an opportunity to influence readers to pick a particular solution for an existing problem in your industry. White papers are a great way to steer the decision-making process of your current or potential customers in a way that’s beneficial to the business. There are several types of white papers companies can use. Let's take a look at the six most popular styles:

1. Educational

As the name suggests, this white paper is used to inform and educate readers regarding a specific topic in a particular industry. The core function of this content is to provide valuable information and answers to the questions that a company’s customers and prospective customers might have. The focus of this is to teach customers what they don’t already know and present a guide. You can use inbound marketing tactics and write how-to’s or give an in-depth analysis of a new industry or technology when writing an educational white paper.

2. Problem Solving

A problem-solving white paper requires persuasive writing techniques, credible sources, and a mature tone. You should think outside the box to present solutions to a problem your customers might have. Of course, the purpose of this type of white paper is to push out your products and services in a subtle manner. However, in doing that, you should focus on presenting unique ideas and steps to solve a particular problem. Think of the solutions that already exist and how you can cater to the same problems with a different approach. Problem-solving whitepapers are also great for sharing company values and beliefs.

3. Technical

A technical white paper provides technical details about an industry, products, services, or technology. You can offer details of your particular products and how to use them in this document. To strengthen the credibility of your technical white paper, you can also present some visuals and case studies. Typically, the purpose of this document is to attract technical buyers to your particular product or service. Your focus should be on your audience and making the copy error-free, concise, and easy to comprehend.

4. Market Research

A whitepaper based on market research includes an executive summary that highlights important data and provides a professional analysis of it. This document typically includes a lot of graphs and interesting analyses or arguments. Such white papers are excellent for PR, and they can either present trends, highlights, and findings or an argument based on the data presented. You can evaluate recent updates on a particular topic in your industry and present interpretations or predictions based on them.

5. Visionary

Typically used by technology-based companies, this type of white paper shows a reader why a particular business is trustworthy and best for long-term partnerships. This document gives innovative insights and provides arguments for why some products or services will never become outdated. You can also use this copy to showcase the visionary experts who work at your organization.

6. Knowledge Papers

Used for both ATL and BTL campaigns, these papers include a debate-style writing technique that puts you in a credible, authoritative, and visionary position. You can choose to address an existing industry debate or create a new one. However, the focus of this paper will be to make your readers listen, thus making persuasion a critical part of it.

Do You Need Help Creating a Whitepaper for Your Business?

We have several years of experience and a proven track record of customer satisfaction when it comes to creating compelling whitepaper copies for businesses. We provide 100% original content, accommodation for urgent requests, proofreading and editing services, unlimited revisions, 24-hour customer support, and ghost-written copies for all our clients. So, if you’re on the lookout for experts in business, technology, hybrid, or product comparison-related white paper writing services, contact us now by calling (877) 897-1725. [post_title] => Writing and Formatting a White Paper Fast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-and-formatting-a-white-paper-fast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 09:03:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 13:03:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2643 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2636 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-14 08:50:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-14 12:50:30 [post_content] => Title capitalization There are varying and often confusing rules to the use of the English language and none so much as title capitalization. With a language that's so pervasive and commonly used, you're bound to find different schools of thought that define the rules in their own way. When it comes to print media and even forms of online written content, the rules can get even more difficult to ascertain. Specifically, when you talk about writing an article, book or even a social media post – thes rules can get very detailed and all the more elusive. There is an abundance of different style guides out there, and even veteran writers can find themselves making mistakes every now and again. If you've found yourself stumped on your journey towards creating exceptional online content, this guide is for you.

Simple Rules for Title Capitalization

Before we can get into the exact nuances that matter with each style, let's look at the things that most styles have in common. To start off…

Always Capitalize the First and Last Words

Let's start with a fairly straightforward rule. Always capitalize the first and last word of your title, regardless of what those words are. For example: Incorrect: "tips to capitalizing titles" Correct: "Tips to Capitalizing Titles"

Always Capitalize oYur Nouns

While the jury might be out on other parts of speech, all of your mainstream style guides agree that nouns are of great importance in a title. A noun is defined as a word that identifies a class of objectsor a specific instance of that class, where the object in question can be any place, animal, or thing (real or abstract). Common nouns deal with class identifiers, while proper nouns deal with instances. Consider the following sentence: "Hello, my name is Jim." Now it's easy to tell that the word "Jim" carries importance here since it contributes heavily to the sentences communicated. So is the word "name", since it determines what the word "Jim" defines. In this case, "Jim" is an example of a proper noun, while "name" is a common noun, and when you're writing in prose or paragraphs, the rules state that you're only supposed to capitalize proper nouns, while common nouns are left in lower case unless they're starting off a sentence. Titles, however, are different. If there was a title in our sentence, the word "name" would also be capitalized, regardless of whichever style you're using. Pronouns are the same; you shouldn't write words like "I", "You", "We", or "Us" without capitalizing them. Common and proper nouns are both categories of principle words, as are pronouns, so you shouldn't usually leave them in the lowercase. So, in this case, our final statement becomes: "Hello, my Name is Jim" We're gradually getting closer to a statement that would function perfectly as a title, but we're not yet there. Next up…

Always Capitalize Your Verbs, Adverbs, and Adjectives

Words like "my" and "your" can be confusing since they function as different types of speech depending on how they're used. Technically speaking, they're attributive adjectives or adverbs denoting possession. This means that they commute the ownership attributed through a pronoun to a common noun or verb. If "I have a car", then that car, by definition, is "my car". The English language doesn't require you to capitalize your possession bearing adjectives and adverbs while writing sentences, but titles are different once again. All styles, including the APA (American Psychological Association), MLA (Modern Language Association), CMOS (Chicago Manual Of Style, at times, shortened to CMS), and AP (Associated Press) styles require you to capitalize all of your adverbs and adjectives, regardless of their position in a title. So going back to our initial statement, we had: "Hello, my Name is Jim" This now becomes: "Hello, My Name is Jim" Which is our finalized version of the title.

Always Leave Your Articles in Lower Case

Articles are words such as the, a, and an, which tell you whether you're referring to a general or specific object (i.e.the calculator refers to a specific calculator vs. a calculator, which is used to make general statements about calculators). As a rule of thumb, it's good to keep in mind that all articles are left in lower case unless they start or end your title.

The Tricky Part of Capitalizing Your title

Now that we've covered the broad strokes version of what to capitalize and what to leave in lower case let's look at parts of speech that have more intricacies involved.

Prepositions

The first area of contention, which most people tend to have trouble with, is prepositions. Prepositions are words that are usually used before pronouns and other nouns to define relations between objects. So when you say someone "arrived after dinner", or that "they were resting inside the room", the words after and inside are actually examples of prepositions. Other examples of prepositions include in, with, within, without, besides, among, around, above, below, across, against, and many more. Different schools of thought have differing opinions regarding what to capitalize and what to leave in regular case in a title when it comes to prepositions.

APA Citation

Regarding the APA citation style, you're only supposed to capitalize your longer prepositions (four letters or more) while leaving shorter ones in lower case. So when you're dealing with examples such as "A Walk Through the Meadow" you have to capitalize the word "Through", even though it's a preposition and it isn't situated at the beginning or end of your title. However, if you're using a shorter preposition, such as in the case of "A Walk in the Park", the preposition is written in lower case.

AP Stylebook

The Associated Press Stylebook is similar in that you only capitalize longer prepositions.

Chicago Manual of Style

The Chicago Manual of Style is slightly more difficult to deal with regarding what you should and shouldn't capitalize. The general rule is that you should never capitalize any prepositions or conjunctions unless:
  • They're used adverbially or adjectivally
  • They're used as conjunctions
  • They call for emphasis or are stressed upon
The first two rules are fairly direct and leave little room for the imagination. If you're saying"My Clothes are Soaked Through" or "Think It Through", you're using the word ‘through’ as an adverb, and it needs to be left capitalized. Similar is the case above when we talk about "A Walk Through the Meadow". The word through is being used as an adjective in this example, so it'll be capitalized once again. The third rule is a little more ambivalent, so you've got room to be creative in the third scenario. After all, what you choose to emphasize or draw the reader's attention to is entirely up to you as the writer, so you can justify capitalizing prepositions in some cases where they play a critical role in defining the meaning of your title.

MLA Style

The last major style we've got to look at is the Modern Language Association style, most commonly used in liberal arts or humanities texts. MLA advises you to leave all your prepositions in lower case, except when they're being used as subordinating conjunctions. We'll cover the specifics of these in the next section. For now, it's best to just keep in mind that MLA doesn't have a word length requirement when it comes to capitalizing prepositions within your title; if you're dealing with a preposition, leave it in lower case.

Conjunctions

There are two kinds of conjunctions in the English Language: subordinating conjunctions and coordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions are words that join two individual statements of equal relevance and importance. Think of words like "and" and "or"; when you say you'll "have either breakfast or lunch", or when you say that you "intend to visit the barbershop and the tailor", the order in which you use the noun terms is usually unimportant. This is because coordinating conjunctions join together two statements of the same grammatical relevance. One statement isn't a precursor or a prerequisite to the other. Subordinating conjunctions like "before", "after", and "until" are different. If you say"I ate before dusk", it's not the same thing as saying "It was dusk before I ate". In fact, both statements have mutually exclusive meanings. One says that you ate your meal before a certain time, while the other says that a certain amount of time had passed before you got to eat. Both cannot be true together. This is the key difference between subordinating and coordinating conjunctions. Subordinating conjunctions combine two statements where one statement is somehow dependent upon the other, either to show one as a necessary consequence of the other or the exact opposite. There's a lot of overlap between prepositions and subordinating conjunctions, and there're plenty of words (like all three of our examples up there) that function as both conjunctions and prepositions. When it comes to the Associated Press Stylebook or the APA Style guide, you're supposed to never capitalize your conjunctions, regardless of the type, unless they're more than four letters long. When it comes to CMOS and MLA, you can only capitalize subordinating conjunctions but never coordinating conjunctions.

Compound Words

Compound or hyphenated words require some handling if you insert them into your titles, but they're just a few rules you need to be aware of. They're the same for the Chicago, APA, and MLA style guides, so you don't have to worry about remembering different rules for each. To start off, if the compound word consists of two separate individual words that carry meaning, you'll capitalize both. An example of this is "self-report", which would be written as "Self-Report" if part of a title. Secondly, if you're dealing with a hyphenated word that consists of a prefix and another word, you'll capitalize just the prefix and leave the actual word in lower case. So the word "anti-inflammatory" would be written as "Anti-inflammatory". The same also applies to words with a single letter attached as a prefix (such as t-shirt, which would be written as T-shirt). Finally, if you're dealing with a compound word that contains prepositions, articles, or coordinating conjunctions, you'll leave the preposition, article, or coordinating conjunction in lower case while capitalizing the rest of the word as outlined above. So a word such as "holier-than-thou" would be written as "Holier-than-Thou" within a title.

The Final Word

Those are all the rules you need to know when deciding what should and shouldn't be capitalized in your title. Be sure to be mindful that the rules for sentence cases tend to be very different from title cases, and you'll be on your way to producing quality content. Of course, there's more to creating quality content, whether it be an article, book, or blog post, our team of content writers can help. [post_title] => Capitalizing Your Title: The Dos, Don'ts and Details [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => capitalizing-your-title-the-dos-donts-and-details [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 08:52:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 12:52:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2636 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2632 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content] => Tips for magazine article writing Do you wish to see your byline adorning the pages of your favorite publication? Do you want to build a reader base that awaits your next article with bated breath? Well, with a little bit of work, you can take your magazine article writing skills to the next level. The key to writing great magazine articles is to create content that engages from start to finish, and provides value to the reader. Regardless of which magazine you are aiming for, a few tips can help you master your craft and produce articles that any publication in the world would be proud to put out for you. However, before we delve into our tips on writing magazine articles, let's take a moment to understand how this particular form of writing differs from other online content writing.

Magazine Article Writing Vs. Other Forms of Writing

Writing an article for a magazine is not the same as writing one for a newspaper or an online directory. Moreover, the pieces you may see in a magazine are inherently different from the content you may find in journals and books as well. The tone and style of these articles vary with each publication, genre, and topic. However, two things set these pieces apart from other forms of writing – they allow more room for creativity and tend to be more visually appealing. While article writing and book writing also require creative input and critical thinking, drafting magazine articles allows you to play with different visual aspects. The use of colorful graphics and photographs to capture attention becomes a must. Furthermore, the length of magazine articles depends on the publication you’re writing for, what you're writing and who you're writing for. In most cases, writing content for the internet does not come with word count limitations. And insofar as books are concerned, you’re usually your own boss. But to give you an idea, an average magazine article can be anywhere between half a page to a dozen pages. Nonetheless, the word count for 12-page pieces is usually not as high as you'd think since they are interspersed with pictures and advertisements.

Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Connect

article writing Here are some tips on how to create magazine articles that will grab your readers' attention.

1. Write About Things You Are Interested In

You are more likely to create engaging content if you write about something you find intriguing or exciting. Your passion for a specific cause or topic will not only show in your work, but it will improve the quality of the output automatically. Articles written with passion are more likely to connect as they give readers a peek into your heart and soul. If you let your words reflect your love and devotion to the subject of your article, it will convince your readers to trust your judgment and authority. Magazine articles are an excellent medium for talented writers to showcase their skills while playing to their strengths. Moreover, publishers always prefer pieces that have an element of individuality. So, if you are particularly fond of something – be it music, traveling, cooking, or martial arts – make sure to use it as your calling card. However, just because you think you know a topic inside out doesn't mean you should cut corners while conducting research. It is essential to scour the internet and see what others are saying. Also, look for the latest stats and back up your claims with valuable insight.

2. Use Compelling Headings and Sub-Headings

Although this tip is not unique to magazine article writing, it requires a special mention. Your headline is the first thing a reader would see while browsing through the index of their favorite magazine or on the front page of their search engine. It is the focal point of your article, as it draws your readers' attention and encourages them to click on it. Many experts compare a well-crafted headline to a beautiful wrapping paper. However, in reality, it is a gift itself. An excellent headline, paired with equally compelling subheadings, will build the interest of your readers. Therefore, you should put in extra effort to create headlines that perfectly capture the essence of your article without giving everything away. Just make sure they are not misleading. It is also a good practice to include your main keyword in the main heading to make your post easy to discover. We'll discuss more on this later.

3. Reel In the Audience with a Unique Angle

One of the best ways to make your magazine article appealing is by ensuring it has a unique perspective. Start by creating a profile for your target audience and figure out where their interests lie. You can also look at the articles published by your competitors and industry giants. Doing so will help you determine which angles have been discussed before and which require more exploration. Instead of just scratching the surface, dig a little deeper and discover fresh viewpoints that establish you as an expert in the field. Even if you are writing on a mainstream topic, such as a new superhero movie that has recently hit the theatres, focus on the aspects that others have not bothered to explore. Remember, creating value-added content will keep your readers engaged and the publisher happy.

4. Keep It Short, Sweet, and To the Point

Brevity is the soul of any well-written content. If you want your magazine article to remain engaging from the first sentence to the last, you must make it easy to read and understand. It is generally good to use short and simple sentences. You should break your information into small chunks without leaving any room for ambiguity. Of course, depending on the nature of your article, you may have to use a few complex sentences. However, using too many complicated terms and long sentences can distract the readers. Moreover, make sure your readers can follow your train of thought without making much effort. Set the pace to match the article's tone, and don't let your message get lost between long sentences. If your audience finds your magazine article writing skills tedious or frustrating, there is a good chance they won't come back for more. Apart from using short and concise sentences, ensure your paragraphs don't exceed six lines. Adding bulleted lists to your content can also make it easy to skim and comprehend, attracting the readers.

5. Include Visual Elements

Break up huge chunks of text with striking pictures, powerful graphics, and well-explained charts. Including valuable visual elements in your magazine article is a foolproof way to increase audience engagement. They will give your audience a chance to rest their eyes without taking their attention away from the piece. With the right images, you can explain your idea or perspective without saying a lot. Additionally, photos and videos can make your content more memorable. They can help your readers interact with the piece, which may also increase their willingness to return to it. These are among the leading reasons why most publishers and brand owners invest extensively on graphic work to support their written content. How to write articles for magazines

6. Get Your Audience Involved and Invested

Starting your magazine article with a thought-provoking question or a shocking fact can help you grab the interest of your audience from the get-go. If your question is something that your readers can relate to personally, it will undoubtedly compel them to read further. However, to draw the attention of your readers, you must understand their desires and pain points. You should also know about your audience's gender, age, and location to choose your article's right style and tone. After all, the ideas that may intrigue women aged 30 to 45 are not likely to resonate with men aged 50 to 65. Furthermore, always address your readers directly. Writing in the second person will allow you to use words such as "you,” "your," and "yours." Your readers should feel as if you have written the article just for them. Once they build that connection, they'll stay hooked until the very last page. Also, make your piece sound like a discussion one would have with their friend. It shouldn't come across as a lesson or an essay. This magazine article writing tip will surely help your audience feel like a part of the narrative.

7. Don't State Facts, Tell a Story

Storytelling is an art. While anyone can share factual information, it takes expertise and a unique thought process to tell a story. As a writer, your biggest priority should be keeping your readers on their toes as they take in your words and build a world of their own. Whether you are writing about politics or deep-sea diving, your anecdotes and experiences can set your article apart from the rest. Sharing small stories also allows your audience to connect with you on an emotional level. It makes you and your words more relatable. People may not remember the statistics you've shared in your article. But they are most likely to remember the tidbits from your personal life that made their way onto the page. To create compelling content, take inspiration from your past experiences or create fictitious scenarios to leave your audience spellbound. You can also use analogies, quotes, and pop culture references to breathe a new life into your content.

8. Choose Your Keywords Wisely

Magazines are no longer limited to the print medium. You can now access almost every magazine online, with some charging a small subscription fee and others allowing you to read their content for free. Now, you may have heard that we should write for people and not the search engines. Our question is, why not write for both? Creating compelling and engaging content is just not enough. You also need to make your articles discoverable. Search engine optimization or SEO is the most effective way to make sure your audience finds your posts. You need tofind out what people are looking for and incorporate those keywords into your article. According to the SEO best practices, your main keyword should appear at the article's beginning, middle, and end. You can also include two to three additional keywords throughout the content. It will increase the chances of your article ranking higher on Google.

9. Wrap It Up Nicely

Don't let your closing statement go to waste. As you wrap up your article, utilize the last few lines to include a CTA call to action. It is essentially a way for you to tell your readers what to do next. Whether you are looking for feedback or want your audience to check out your latest video series, make sure to include a relevant link that directs them to your preferred webpage or service. The next step is to edit your content. You can use services such as Grammarly or Copyscape to ensure your article is free of mistakes and plagiarism. This is also your last opportunity to format the piece and ensure no negative spaces or weird indentations. Moreover, please use different font sizes for headings, subheadings, and body to increase readability and engagement. You can also use bold words and italicized sentences to make your critical ideas more prominent.

Magazine Article Writing Made Easy

To conclude, there are no set rules to writing a compelling magazine article. However, the tips mentioned above will enable you to break the mold by producing great content. A wisely chosen topic with a unique perspective and great headline can do wonders for your career. Similarly, short and clear sentences sprinkled with personal anecdotes can make your article more fun to read. If you feel a little lost in how to do go it alone, our article writing service could be the order of the day. Our team of experienced article writers ably supported by our team of expert designers can help you create magazine articles that hit the right note every time. [post_title] => 9 Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Hook Readers from Start to Finish [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 9-tips-for-writing-magazine-articles-that-hook-readers-from-start-to-finish [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2632 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2622 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-29 06:30:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-29 10:30:30 [post_content] => how to write product descriptions A compelling product description is crucial to the success of your eCommerce business. For those of you that don’t know, these are essential pieces of marketing copy that describes your product’s features and benefits to potential customers, persuading them to buy. Excellent product descriptions accurately capture the essence of a product to influence purchase decisions. In other words, they can well be the back bone of your online business’s success. Most entrepreneurs and marketers struggle with writing powerful product descriptions that can convert casual bowsers into life-long customers. They craft their copies around factual information and don't focus on the fact that they are selling an actual product to a real person. As a result, most product descriptions look like a block of information you are likely to find at the back of a product label. Below, we have put together some tried-and-tested tips on how to write a product description that converts.

1. Define Your Target Audience

Before you start writing a product description, you must understand the persona of your potential buyer. Defining your target audience can help you address them directly and engage them in a conversation. You can only create an impactful copy if you know who you're writing for and what would compel the reader to buy your product. It is also important to remember that the features that may entice one demographic might not be valuable to the other. Moreover, knowing your audiencecan help you select the right words and answer the right questions. It also enables you to find the perfect tone for the product.For example, you may want to inject humor into a product description for Christmas sweaters, but you can't use the same writing style to sell medical equipment or something more serious, such as coffins. Narrowing down the consumer characteristics can help you draft a copy that is equal parts informative and persuasive. If your product description addresses the pain points, values, interests, and frustrations of your buyers, there is a good chance they'd be willing to spend their hard-earned money on it.

2. Focus on Benefits over Features

Agreat product description must include all the information a buyer may need to make a purchase. It should tell the customer about the unique specifications of your product that set it apart from the rest and share any technical facts that may influence their decision. However, you must also understand that the features you are excited to write about might not necessarily interest your target audience. Some of them may even find it boring. The best way to retain customer attention and capture their interest is by explaining how the product will benefit them. Your copy should describe the advantages of a product and tell the buyer how it will reduce their pain points or enhance their quality of life. Before you start writing a product description, list down the top features of the item you are selling and then translate them into substantial benefits. Moreover, to prevent your copy from looking like an advertisement, refrain from using superfluous words. It would be best if you also avoided using superlatives that you can't justify. Following this tip will help you how to write a description that converts into a sale.

3. Elicit Emotions through Storytelling

A strong product description provides the buyers with all the relevant details and impacts them emotionally. According to a 2009 research study,holding a product in hand increases a person's desire to buy or own it. However, since they can't physically touch your product through their screens, your job is to paint a vivid picture that also packs an emotional punch. If you want your product descriptions to convert, make sure your content tells a story that your potential buyers can connect with. You can set the scene by telling them who created the product and what inspired them to do so. Taking the buyers on the journey of developing the product will allow them to relate to it. Depending on what you're selling, a personal anecdote or an entertaining fact about the product may also increase the buyer's interest. Nonetheless, you must make sure your words don't come across as dishonest or insincere. On the contrary, your story should enable customers to envision the product and how it would add value to their life.

4. Make It Sound like a Real Conversation

conversational product descriptions It may be tempting to sprinkle your product description with fancy words and literary references, but doing so can potentially turn away your customers. So, if you want the buyers to connect with your product emotionally and ultimately buy it, consider adopting a natural tone and using simple words. Ideally, a product description should sound like a conversation between friends. It should flow smoothly and have a life of its own. Instead of making sweeping statements, you should inform your buyers about the features and benefits just like you would share with a friend or a loved one. The customer should feel like you have their best interest at heart and that your words are not merely transactional. Product descriptions that use natural language and a friendly tone can help your eCommerce business  build a loyal customer base. Potential buyers are more likely to purchase if they find your copy to be honest and genuine. It would also help you stand out from the competition and make your products more memorable. If you need help writing product descriptions that sell, please feel free to give us a call.

5. Be Mindful of Power Words

Did you know there are certain words you can include in your product description to elicit a response from your target audience? More often than not, business owners and marketers end up using words such as "revolutionary" or "innovative"to describe a product when it is anything but that. Instead, sprinkle your copy with descriptive words and adjectives that may excite or intrigueyour prospective buyers. For example, if you are writing a product description for a dress, you can replace the terms "pretty" and "high-quality" with "sensational"and"luxurious." According to David Ogilvy, here are some of the most influential words that can turn a casual reader into a buyer.
  • Suddenly
  • Now
  • Announcing
  • Introducing
  • Amazing
  • Sensational
  • Revolutionary
  • Miracle
  • Magic
  • Quick
  • Hurry
Using these power words can take your product description to the next level.

6. Make Your Copy Easy to Scan

A great product description is easy to read and understand. Instead of explaining your product in lengthy and complex paragraphs, consider using simple sentences that get the message across. Customers have a notoriously short attention span when it comes to making online purchases. So, the best thing you can do to keep them interested in your product is to present them with a description that they can scan. For example, you can break down product specifications into bullet points to make them more reader-friendly. Moreover, different font sizes and lots of white space can help break the visual clutter. Your buyer shouldn't have to sift through long pieces of writing to find valuable information. Instead, you should present it to them on a figurative silver platter. Incorporating the product's name into the heading and using highlighted words can also impact the reader's attention span. If you’re struggling to create quality product descriptions at scale, our product description writing service might be what you need.

7. Optimize for Search Engines

Optimize your product descriptions for Google Search Including specific keywords in your product descriptions can help improve your search engine optimization (SEO). This will ultimately increase your chances of ranking high on the search results page. If you want to draft a conversion-oriented copy, make sure to do a little bit of keyword research to find out what the customers are searching for. Once you have found suitable keywords, integrate them and their variations into your content. The SEO best practices suggest placing keywords in the page titles, Meta descriptions, and image tags.  For good measure, include the main keyword at the top and bottom of your page to ensure your customers can easily find your product. It is also worth mentioning that your content should not be stuffed with keywords, as it may make your product description look unauthentic. The goal of optimizing your product description is to help gain new customers. Adding relevant keywords will allow prospective buyers to discover your brand and learn about its values with a few simple clicks on their device. Furthermore, adding relevant tags to product images also carries a lot of weight with search engines, which takes us to our next tip on how to write a product description that compels customers.

8. Always Use Quality Images

As the wise adage goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. If you want to master the art of writing excellent product descriptions, you cannot compromise on the quality of images. As mentioned above, customers cannot physically see or touch your product. While your words can help them envision how the product may look or feel, adding a good image along with your text can actually encourage them to buy it. It is one of the essential parts of a powerful product description. Most high-end brands hire professionals to create stunning photos and videos that capture all the best features of their products. However, spending precious resources on such services may not be feasible for new startups and small businesses. Instead of focusing too much on what your competitors are doing, divert your energy to take a few quality photos that enhance your product and effectively display its unique specifications. As long as your image is large, clear, and in line with the overall theme of your brand, there is a good chance that it will manage to convert readers into buyers. The accompanying copy should also create imagery that entices the customer into imagining what it would be like to hold or use the product.

What a short video regarding product description importance

Our Final Thoughts

Those were our best tips on how to write a product description that compels potential customers to make a purchase. If you are an entrepreneur or a small business owner looking to create brand awareness and improve your conversion rate, our team of content writers is ever-ready to help. To find out more about our services, contact us today. [post_title] => How to Write Compelling Product Descriptions that Convert [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-compelling-product-descriptions-that-convert [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:37:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:37:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2622 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2616 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content] => Bio Writing We’ve all had to be introspective at some point, especially when you’re looking to put yourself out there through a professional bio. You’ve likely thought about who you are or what qualities you embody. You’ve thought about your achievements.  Thinking to yourself is one thing, though, and writing it down for an external audience is entirely another. On the surface, it should be fairly simple. It’s a short paragraph or two describing your professional journey so far and where you intend to take it. But then why do so many people struggle to write a bio that adequately captures who they are? We’ve put together a checklist of the things that combine to make a great bio. To start off:

Start Strong

In many ways, the most important part of your blog is the opening section. A strong introduction not only reels your readers in, it can also serve to highlight the strongest aspects of your repertoire. Those first few lines need to be absolutely spot on to prompt the person reading to continue, so don’t skimp on your trial and error. Try out as many opening lines as you can think of if you feel like your current iteration could be better. Be confident, be honest, and don’t hesitate to strut your stuff. The opening lines are all about making an impact, and there’s a variety of ways to do this. You can open with humour, you can open with an achievement that speaks for itself, or you can open with a reference. There’s room to experiment, so there’s no excuse for trying as hard as you can to think of what fits your bio best.

Be Partial Towards Recent Developments, but Don’t Hesitate to Discuss How Got You Here

Like a resume, the more current your bio is, the better. Make sure you include a sentence or two that tells people, at least vaguely, about where you are now and what you’re doing. It lets prospective interests know what you’re doing these days and whether your skillset is relevant to them. While you might be tempted to list events in order of recency, don’t do that. Not every post is important, and not every move significant. Instead, if there’s a turning point in your professional development, such as a time when you switched fields three years ago, you’re better off addressing that. It’s not as if you’ve got room to be long-winded, but you should still discuss what prompted the switch, so long as you were positively motivated. You can sneak in a line or two about how your prior experience empowers you in your current line of work as well.

Decide on a Tone and Keep It Consistent

A bio is a concise description and one that sees many iterations as your career evolves and your professional development progresses. If you’re used to cutting out and adding in individual lines (and even if you’re not), it’s good to give the whole thing a read over to see if you’re consistent. While the right tone for you will depend entirely on what career you’re in and how you’re most comfortable expressing yourself, there are certain pointers. You shouldn’t be arrogant or overly informal; it’s much better to phrase your brags as subtly as possible and maintain a polite disposition. Achievements are more effective when mildly understated than they are when blown out of proportion, so make sure you maintain a humble tone. Humor isn’t necessarily off the cards, but you have to balance it out with serious statements. Also, your best bet is tongue-in-cheek humor rather than something that might risk offending someone; remember, this is a professional piece. Consistency also extends to whether or not you’re writing in first-person. Don’t go from I to they (first to third-person), or skip the pronoun altogether (implied the first person). This of course is easier said than done, and if it’s not for you – there is no shame in hiring professional bio writers instead.

Don’t Forget to Inject some Personality into Your Writing

personality in your bio One of the most typical mistakes when writing a bio is being too formulaic in your approach. You find something that really works, so you copy the same structure or type out the entire thing in as neutral a tone as possible. Nothing which worked for someone else needs to work just as well for you. Your Bio should be like your fingerprint, abstractly similar but entirely unique in itself. You have an entire lifetime of experiences at your disposal, so be sure to showcase as much of them as you can, as positively as you can. Your writing conveys not only your experiences but also aspects of your outlook and who you are. You shouldn’t shy away from including stuff about your innermost goals and motivations to the extent that you’re comfortable. While you shouldn’t be too flowery in your use of language, don’t be afraid to use more complicated terms where there is merit to them.

Always Double Check Guidelines

The platform or portal you’re submitting your bio to might have specific guidelines for what’s considered a valid submission. Always make sure that you check all the boxes and that you haven’t included anything that they’ve disallowed. This also means that you won’t be able to submit the same exact bio to every single prospect, but that should be standard practice as it is. Make sure you tailor your bio to the sort of opportunity you’re on the hunt for to give yourself the best possible chances.

Be Concise

Top the point writing We’ve already discussed how you shouldn’t pad your bio, but there’s more to a good bio than just keeping things simple. Your bio is meant to be a rich summary of your recent professional experiences, but you don’t need to mention every single thing you’ve already mentioned with your resume. This brings us to another point: you should try to keep repetition between your bio and your resume to a minimum. That’s not to say there should be no overlap at all, but rather, that your bio should only further explore the most important parts of your resume, the parts you want a potential employer to focus on. By emphasizing those tenures, you can draw attention to aspects of your development that may not have been adequately represented as just another bullet point in your CV or LinkedIn profile.

Don’t List Your Achievements

Recall what we said about trying to keep yourself sounding as down to earth as possible. If your bio reads like a list of things you’ve accomplished, you’re not doing it right. Instead of leading every statement with what you are or what you’ve achieved, try to pivot to what you have to offer someone you’d want to establish a professional relationship with. Instead of talking about your skills and how you’ve acquired them, talk about what those skills can accomplish for someone working with you. People want to see what value you bring to the table, so making your bio about what you have to give, rather than just what you have, is a great strategy to employ.

Add a Personal Touch

We’ve already discussed the importance of abandoning the formulaic approach, but a great bio goes further than that. A bio should demonstrate more than just professional experience; it’s a representation of who you are. As such, you can’t expect to paint a clear picture of yourself by talking about your career alone; you can and should include references to personal triumphs and milestones. We’re obviously not talking about detailed narrations (you don’t have the words to spare, nor that much creative license), but you can definitely include distilled versions of them. Simply mentioning that you’re an aquaphobe learning how to swim, for example, can tell your employer plenty about the fact that you take adversity on the chin and that you have a mind to surmount obstacles. Personal touches like these help highlight crucial aspects of your personality that might help distinguish you from other applicants, so it’s a good idea to include something about your life. Another way you could benefit from a personal addition is to use it to demonstrate your more personable traits. This could be through humor, or a line or two about your charitable pursuits, or just what you enjoy doing in your free time. Either way, it helps paint you as more than just a robot with work experience, so be sure to make the most of it.

Maintain a Balance

So you’ve got to include aspects of your personality, personal pursuits, career progression, and current state of employment. While adequately covering all of those focus areas, you also have to flow so that your bio doesn’t read like a series of disconnected statements. And you have to keep to a very strict word count while doing all of the above. This can prove daunting, even for the best of us, and that’s why bio writing is more art than science. It’s also why revising your bio is a very tedious process that can involve hours of brainstorming with very little to show for it.

Watch a short video to learn more about What is a Biography

Bio Writers to Make Your Look Like a Million Bucks

If you’ve been having trouble with figuring out just the right words to put in your bio, or you’re second-guessing what your bio should look like – our team of Professional Bio Writers can help. From techies to published authors, finance execs to teachers – our versatile team of bio writers understands what every bio needs and delivers. [post_title] => How to Write the Perfect Professional Bio [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-the-perfect-professional-bio [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2616 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2608 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-15 06:51:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:51:31 [post_content] => writing SEO friendly content Search engine optimization, or SEO, as it may be known to most of you, is a rapidly evolving discipline that has been on the rise ever since Google took the world of search engines by storm. Accoridngly, learning how to write SEO-firendly articles is number one on the checklist of content producers that want to ace SERPs.

Keep Up-to-date with Google

Last year, Google announced the addition of core web vitals and page experience signals as ranking factors in search results. We won't get into too much detail about what these are specifically just yet, but you should know that your core web vitals tell Google how quickly and smoothly a page loads in front of a user. The other page experience signals are, more or less, boxes you need to check regarding the security of your connection with your users, and that they're being delivered a quality experience that isn't overly annoying or outdated. All we mean to do with the above is highlight that the field of search engine optimization is constantly evolving. With Google needing to constantly roll out updates to combat people finding shortcuts to ranking better (such as black hat backlinking practices) or breaking ranking factors altogether and using them for gaming the system (such as keyword cramming). While Google does come out with its SEO guidelines to help people understand how they can improve their website and put out content in a way that helps them rank better, what Google does not do is tell you exactly how searches are ranked and how much each individual metric contributes to your overall ranking. For all of these reasons and others, keeping up with all of the advancements taking place within the field of SEO can be a difficult task, even for those of us that call SEO their bread and butter.

Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content

If you've tried learning how to do your own SEO before, and you found the process to be too tedious or difficult, then this article is for you. Not only will we go over exactly how you can go about making your content SEO friendly, we'll also let you know key tips and tools you can use to help you with the process.

Tip 1: Select the right topics to write about

A great way to make a splash on those Search Engine Ranking Pages (SERPs) is to select topics that are currently garnering interest amongst the public. Even if your website or business's actual domain area isn't the most popular, get creative and find ways to link it to those popular topics. Remember, even the best-written content won't garner views if you're writing about something that no one wants to read about. This is where learning how to use Google Trends for SEO could be beneficial. Content marketing strategies are great and all, but you'd have to be a magician to get people to read an article they have no interest in. If you're worried that focusing on topics of interest will have you competing with industry giants for rankings, don't be. Remember, recency is also a factor in search results ranking, so simply the fact that you're posting your stuff today is going to get you at least some preferential treatment. And if your stuff is original and out of the box, providing a fresh perspective or some expertise that can't be found elsewhere, that's going to push you up even further. Besides, you shouldn't be worried about the competition anyways; SERPs are full of examples of Davids who counter Industry Goliaths, and the next one might just be you. As long as you can focus on providing quality experience to your users (and do so consistently), it'll always shine through sooner or later. Of course, this is where our article writing service can give you the leg up.

Tip 2: Keyword research is still paramount (and probably will continue to be for at least a while)

SEO-friendly content needs strong keyword research There's one aspect of SEO that hasn't changed much over the years: Using high-interest keywords still helps you rise to the top of rank results. You should make it a routine practice to check out keyword rankings relating to your topic area, once before you've written your piece and once after it's done, right before you publish. Why before you publish? To make sure you haven't overused your keyword or used too many keywords in your text. A piece that's 500 words long shouldn't try to target ten different keywords, and it shouldn't contain fifteen instances of your primary keyword. Black hat hacks like these were popular during the early years of SEO, but Google's done plenty to prevent them from being viable today. Don't fall victim to your own bad practices. For a standard guideline regarding how many instances of a particular keyword should be in an article:
  • Keep yourself to two to three instances at most for a 500-word article
  • Add one for each additional 500 words when it comes to longer articles.
According to this directive, a 2000 word piece should contain six instances of a particular keyword. Naturally, if your keyword is a generic term, you might find yourself using it a bit more, and that's okay, but try to avoid being too repetitive with it. Try for synonyms or abbreviations, anything you can do to avoid making it seem like you've crammed; if you can tell, chances are Google can too. Aside from this, try to be as strategic as you can with your keyword use. Don't rush to put out a piece relating to each popular search term you can find that's relevant to your business. There's such a thing as Keyword Cannibalization; it's where your own articles are competing with one another for the same keyword and actually taking traffic away from one another. We're sure we don't need to spell it out for you, but this isn't a good thing. When it comes to terms that are highly relevant to your website, try to put out long-form content that covers as many aspects of the term as you can, rather than rushing to release content relating to every term people could possibly search for. Be strategic with your content; it will pay dividends in the long run. Oh, and speaking of being strategic…

Tip 3: Plan out an approach to content that lets you make the most of different types of articles

Google and other search engines tend to love websites that are regularly updated. This means releasing daily content for many website owners, even if that content is just a rehashed version of an article they'd put out the previous week. This might work for some people, but it certainly isn't a surefire way to succeed with your content. If you're going to have to repeat yourself eventually, and you know it, you should plan out your topics so that you maximize the amount of time there is between two similar articles. You can use the time in between to figure out how you can cover the same topic or domain area from a different perspective.

Struggling for Ideas? Well, that’s what professionals are for. Our diverse team of content writers are not only well-versed with creating compelling and unique content – but at scale.

Another way to keep things fresh is to cover topical, time-sensitive developments within your focus area. For example, you can write a long-form cornerstone article on content writing best practices, and that article can remain the same for a long while. Instead of writing about that topic again, you can later release content about how opinion pieces are the way to go in 2021 and fill that article with reasons for why perspective based content is especially relevant after we've all experienced a lockdown that cut us off from being exposed to other opinions. While opinion pieces don't inspire the sort of trust that a faultless factual piece might, they're excellent for increasing engagement and getting people talking in your comments section. There's no real substitute for user engagement and no second-guessing the fact that search engines are partial towards content that engages readers, so why not experiment a bit and get creative. And creativity doesn't just have to do with how and what you write about.

Tip 4: Use every channel (and platform) at your disposal to make people aware of the content you're publishing

social media like facebook is key for SEO content Social Media is a great way to get more eyes on your content. If an article on your site isn't getting the traction you'd want it to, posting a link to the article on your business's Facebook page along with a captivating tagline or quote from the article might be just the thing to get those numbers up to desirable levels. More clicks mean more views, and more views mean preferential treatment within search results, so don't be shy about plugging your content wherever you can. There was a time when businesses just needed to have a listing in the Yellow Pages, but that time has long since passed. Now businesses are everywhere, from Facebook and Instagram to Twitter and LinkedIn. There's no reason your business shouldn't have a face on each and every one of these platforms. If you pay enough attention to what works on each of them, you might just find that one, in particular, is extremely conducive to the type of content you're putting out and gets you more traffic than the rest of them. Once you know this, you can start focusing more on generating more content for that platform and using that content to generate more traffic for your e-commerce website or storefront. A content writing service can be your saving grace here. Getting people to your content isn't everything though, you've also got to think about where people are going from your articles…

Tip 5: Make sure you put the right links in your content (and the right type of links as well)

Everyone knows not to link to their competitors. But if you've been in the content game as long as we have, you might also know that you can't just back up your own content with any material you can find that supports your claims. There's a LOT of repetition on the Internet. You can Google any topic and find twenty different articles all saying the same thing using slightly different words. You might think that linking to any one of them serves the purposes you need for your articles, but that just isn't true. So what then, do you link to the best written of those articles? Not always. Informational content, such as the stuff you'd find on a .edu or .gov site. .Org sites are good, too, as long as the article you're linking to isn't trying to sell something itself. SEO-friendly content is written with the intent to inform and it always tends to rank better and contribute more to the credibility of what you're saying than content that has an ulterior motive. Keep that in mind while you're selecting which articles to link to. Credible links get your website more "Authority". Authority is a holistic metric that determines how much clout you have within your domain or focus area. Quality internal links also help you gain authority since users can jump from article to article within your site without finding redundant or otherwise fruitless content. But if you're too liberal with your external links (i.e. links that lead out of your site) you can end up losing authority to the pages you link to. This isn't always a bad thing, but you should try to use "no follow" links for at least some of your outbound links for this reason. No-follow links prevent crawlers from passing authority along from your site to the site you're linking to.

SEO-Friendly Content by Experts

If you've enjoyed this list of SEO-friendly practices to help your website take off, consider reaching out to us to find out more about what we can do to help revamp your content portfolio. We've got years of experience in the industry and a long list of satisfied clientele to back us up, so why not give us a call. [post_title] => Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content to Gain Visibility on Search Engines [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => tips-for-writing-seo-friendly-content [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-15 06:53:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:53:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2608 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2598 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-08 08:17:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-08 12:17:26 [post_content] => Hire professional transcribers Speech recognition has come a long way and has been one of the leading developments in reach towards the Internet of Things. Now, with Google Home and Amazon’s Alexa, we can control just about any aspect of room ambience without moving an inch. While services like these might lead you to believe that speech recognition has evolved to the point where human transcription just doesn’t make sense anymore, we’re still far from being there yet. We’re not saying that speech recognition hasn’t grown by leaps and bounds in the past decade or so, far from it, in fact, it’s just that it’s not quite gotten to the point where it can be considered as reliable as the human mind. In other words, if you want accurate transcriptions where context, punctuation and accents are accounted for, going for a transcription writing service is your best bet. Before we can explore a comparison between these two methods, let us take a look at what both are:

Hiring Professional Transcribers Over Speech Recognition

Manual transcription is fairly straightforward. A person listens to an audio recording and jots down the contents; there isn’t much to explain there. To understand why human beings are better at this task, we must first understand how we interpret language. The human mind is a multi-track processor. This means that it can selectively and intuitively utilize multiple processes towards the same end, switching freely between those processes as the need arises. The most powerful tool we have at our disposal when it comes to understanding speech is the flexible use of context. We can glean details about the subject conversation like several speakers, roles in the conversation, subject matter, and key points, just from listening to the conversation for a small amount of time. Even if there are noisier sections, we can pause, rewind, and play again until we arrive at a reasonable guess for what is being said. If that doesn’t work, we can continue further along in the conversation and figure out what might have gone in a particular section through later references.

How Accurate is Speech Recognition

ASR, or Automated Speech Recognition, is the domain of computer science and technological research that deals with getting computers to understand the spoken word. In an ideal scenario, where you’re dealing with clean (noiseless), high fidelity audio, a computer can indeed measure up to human standards and even compete with top-notch transcribers. Just so you can compare, the human error rate during audio transcription is about four percent, while these artificial intelligence-based technologies usually hover around the five percent mark. That means that they’re almost as good if only slightly worse, than humans at transcribing audio. The ball game shifts a bit when we talk about LVCSR (Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition). These applications are categorized by an extremely large vocabulary of words and fluid conversation between multiple speakers. When it comes to these scenarios, the error rate for humans is still at roughly four to five percent, while their technological counterpart measures in at roughly 8 – 10 percent. An accuracy rate of 10 percent means an error every 10 words, which is far beyond the acceptable amount. But real-world applications are much, much worse. Say you have a phone call or a voice note you’d like transcribed. The background noise can make certain words hard for the speech recognition software to detect, but that’s to be expected. In computer science terms, when you use the word “noise” you’re actually describing different elements that obscure the quality of a particular frame (in the case of audio and video). Noise can come from various sources and increases as you increase volume and distance from the audio capture device. But noise isn’t just an environmental factor, at least not in traditional terms. You see, when we communicate over telephone lines, the audio signal generated by our voices is actually converted to an electrical signal, which travels across large distances and is then converted back into audio for us to hear. These conversions minimize line loss and maximize distance, allowing us to make phone calls across the world. However, “minimize” is a relative term here; while we can hear and understand a person speaking on a phone call, a computer might not be able to do the same. There are certain aspects of speech recognition that computers truly excel at. They’re many magnitudes of times faster, and as such, some programs can sift through hundreds of hours of audio in the time, it would take a human being to complete working on a one-hour transcription. However, to mimic a process as complex as understanding human speech, a computer must break it down into individual tasks. Preprocessing, feature extraction, acoustic modelling, language modelling, and decoding are all individual steps in a process designed to achieve the same results as human listening, but that doesn’t mean that both work in the same way.

Why Hiring a Transcription Service is the Better Option

This fluid use of context and a wider understanding of the way objects are related in the world gives human transcribers an edge over conventional computer-based means. Again, even the most advanced neural networks only attempt to mimic our faculty of working with context, and this mimicry is subject to our own understanding of how our mind works, which is admittedly limited. Systems designed by us to do something our minds do, when we ourselves only have a rudimentary understanding of the internal workings of the human mind, cannot reach the level of accuracy that a professional who has listened to thousands of hours of audio can offer us. Meanwhile, a computer application will break the process down into multiple simple steps, and by the end of all these processes, arrive at a transcription. While we did mention each of the steps that a hypothetical speech recognition tool could take to recognize patterns in speech, knowing what each of these means isn’t necessary for the purposes of this article. You need to know that certain aspects of spoken language don’t necessarily translate very well to the machine equivalent of the listening process. The main issues are as follows:

Punctuation

It can be difficult to determine how to punctuate a sentence heard over the phone or out of context, even for human transcriptionists. However, because we have a wider understanding of linguistic rules to work with, we can easily make educated guesses about where to put commas, periods, and semicolons and where to swap out a period for an exclamation mark, for example. A computer, meanwhile, can only attempt a verbatim transcription, which completely ignores punctuation within a sentence most of the time. What you’re left with is a mess of words separated by no more than a few sparse periods.

Filler Words and Offhand Sounds

These areother aspects of transcription that software fails to reliably account for. Filler words are commonly used unintentionally during the fluid speech, with the most easily explainable reason for their presence being a person struggling to reach for their next word. A program will not be able to distinguish that a person saying “what’s the word?” is actually trying to recall a word they can’t remember and will instead transcribe that phrase along with what was said previously. It sounds like “oh”s and “ah”s are just as difficult for computers to ignore, and they can make many initial drafts seem like gibberish to the intelligent reader. Characteristics of speech like a lisp or a stutter are no different from filler words and sounds. In fact, if anything, these are much worse, as they can affect even words the software would normally detect. Tweaking the software to work with these difficulties is often a very complicated process if it’s possible at all, and it might render the software incapable of recognizing normal speech.

Dialect, accents, and other intangible aspects of speech

While it may not have as much bearing on how a particular language is expressed in writing, locality does greatly affect the way we speak any given language. Differences in pronunciation and enunciation between two people within the same locality are often difficult, if not impossible, to account for, so a person speaking in a different dialect may as well be speaking a different language altogether. Creating software or training an AI agent to understand multiple dialects of the same language is harder than you might think. On some level, the software must determine which particular dialect is being spoken during the feature extraction process. The difficulty of this task is compounded when you have multiple speakers, especially speakers from diverse cultural backgrounds.

The need for edited transcriptions

Edited transcriptions are one possible solution to some of the problems relating to each of the previous aspects of translation. Instead of the verbatim transcription that software generates being the final product, a service provider will often offer some “post-processing” work, in the form of a human being going over the verbatim transcript and fixing minor errors, removing redundancies and filler, and generally improving its readability (by replacing incorrect homophones, for example). Since this involves essentially hiring a person to proofread a computer-generated translation, it eliminates the “automated” aspect of the process. Instead of using human effort to counter the weaknesses of a computer system (and still arrive at a final product that doesn’t meet the same standards as a professional transcription), why not replace the software application with human effort entirely? This is not to say that software-generated recordings don’t have their own audience. For some purposes, such as voicemail recordings and general surveillance, automated speech recognition makes perfect sense. In these cases, minor transcription errors can be overlooked in light of the cost-saving that ASR offers. This is also ASR’s greatest saving grace for applications where the volume of incoming data is far too high for a human transcription to be viable. In cases where high volumes and time-sensitivity factors are considered, edited documents offer the greatest compromise between ASR (which wouldn’t be accurate enough on its own) and professional transcription (which wouldn’t be as cost-effective. For more sensitive applications, especially those in which the contents of a recording are of critical value or where the quality of recordings is inconsistent or cannot be guaranteed, a professionally transcribed document always manages to edge out a computer-generated one.

Hiring Professional Transcribers Vs. Speech Software

As research into natural language processing and speech recognition applications begin to bear greater fruit, we may eventually arrive at a focal point where computer-generated transcriptions are virtually indistinguishable from professionally transcribed ones. We’re definitely not there yet, though, and given the breadth of problems that computer scientists must tackle to achieve this, it’s safe to say we won’t be there any time soon. While software may achieve great results for extremely specialized applications, a general-use speech recognition software that can reliably get the job done, regardless of the scope of the task, simply doesn’t exist right now. That’s why we’d suggest that you always opt for professional transcription service over an automatically generated one, especially if you’re invested in maintaining the quality of your final product. Get in touch and let’s get your transcription project off the blocks right away. [post_title] => Why Hire Professional Transcribers Instead of Using Transcription Software [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => why-hire-professional-transcribers-instead-of-using-transcription-software [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-02 08:20:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-02 12:20:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2598 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2593 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-03 08:12:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-03 12:12:29 [post_content] => Eulogy speech writing Bereavement can be one of the most difficult aspects of life to cope with. Loved ones inevitably pass on, but writing a eulogy speech that does justice to the loss you feel is one of the hardest things you’ll ever have to do. If you (or someone you know) have lost someone recently, then you’ll know the feeling of disbelief that comes with such an event. That, and the whirlwind of emotions that goes along with it, is enough to deal with on its own. Yet with every passing, those left behind are entrusted with one fundamental task by the recently deceased: to live on. The first step towards a continued life is to put those who are gone to rest.

Eulogy Speeches – Reminding Ourselves that We Grieve Together

For the sake of formality, let us start by taking a look at the definition of a eulogy. A eulogy is a speech given during a funeral as a tribute to the recently deceased – one that recounts moments shared with them, as well as bits and pieces of what you’ll remember them most fondly for. It’s considered an honor to be asked to give a eulogy for someone you knew, as it tends to show just how great a part you played in their lives, and how great a part they played in yours. A eulogy can present itself as a very tricky task, especially given the breadth of what it aims to achieve, as well as the gravity of the situation. You’re not just saying good bye to someone who was a close companion in one way or another, you’re also addressing a gathering of people who are similarly bereaved and grieving with you. When you speak, you are speaking as the singular voice that ushers that lost loved one to the great beyond – your words forming the ending note in the final chapter of their lives. You speak on the behalf of everyone who grieves with you, and sometimes on the behalf of the deceased themselves. The aim is to say good bye in a way that respects the time you spent together, and steels everyone in preparation for times to come. Naturally, this is quite the responsibility, and most of the time, the person taking it on is one of the people who are most affected by the loss. Most people will not give many eulogies over the course of their lives, which means advice (at least advice that is based on experience) will be hard to come by, and undoubtedly very difficult to ask for. Moreover, every person is different, meaning every eulogy is different, and different people will approach the task in very unique ways. There are some key considerations, however, that remain common throughout parting addresses, and knowing these can help you figure out how you want to word and deliver your own piece. To start off…

Tips for Writing a Touching Eulogy Speech

We mentioned this in passing earlier, but it deserves an explicit mention: There’s no such thing as a clinical approach to eulogy writing. You can seek inspiration wherever you might find it, but always remember that the person you’re writing about, and the assembly you’re speaking to, are both entirely unique to your situation. As such, adopting a formulaic approach to speech writing can take away from the essence of what a eulogy aims to achieve. You want your eulogy to be guided by a respect for your feelings, and the feelings of the people you’re addressing; and not by a desire to check the boxes for what makes a complete speech.

1.    Remember to Talk to Other People Who Were Close to the Deceased

This is also critical, and applies even more so when you’ve been asked to deliver the eulogy by someone who, in your mind, was closer to the deceased than even you. You should make sure that your address is not focused exclusively on moments you shared with the dearly departed, without giving room for other people in the assembly to connect to it. Remember, the purpose of a eulogy is twofold – you’re honoring a lost loved one and acknowledging their loss, while also attempting to make the process of bearing that loss easier on those around you. Make sure your own stories are interspersed with mentions of other people who are present, if not their stories as well. Being included in the process of informing your eulogy helps people feel less isolated in their grief, which in turn makes grieving a less difficult ordeal. Also, while you had your own unique connection to the deceased, so did many of those around you at the time you’re delivering your address; it’s important that you acknowledge those connections when you’re speaking to everyone.

2.    Decide on a Structure for Your Funeral Speech

There’re two basic approaches to how you can structure a eulogy, you can either follow a chronology, or a mood board.

Chronology-based eulogy

It will focus on outlining a timeline of events in the deceased’s life, from when and where they were born to the circumstances of their eventual passing. A life is a very long ordeal to sum up in just a few minutes though, so write down significant events you want to mention before you actually write your piece so that you don’t forget to mention something that shouldn’t have been omitted. Significant events can be anything including a marriage or a fateful encounter with a significant other, the birth of a child, service in the military, etc. Once you’ve written your speech around these events, you can include a brief paragraph that summarizes the different ways in which the deceased managed to enrich the lives of those around them.

Mood boards

These are slightly different. Instead of focusing on a series of events in chronological order, you group anecdotes or significant encounters into different segments depending on how they’d make the audience feel. The passing of a loved one is a decidedly somber and sorrowful occasion, but that doesn’t mean the tone of your eulogy has to be exclusively depressing throughout. For example, you could start with a note about the many hardships the person in question faced throughout their lives (sorrowful), and transition to how they managed to surmount all of those hardships (uplifting), and end on a comment about how the departed taught us to strive to achieve great things even in the face of overwhelming opposition (hopeful). If a particular negative section goes on a little too long, you could include a light-hearted anecdote or comment, especially if it is one that’s easy to associate with the memory of the deceased. Structuring your eulogy this way helps you find ways to incorporate elements of relief (such as humor) while still keeping the overall tone respectful, though it does require you to leverage your writing and speaking skills a bit more than a chronology. Speaking of which…

What Do You Say in a Eulogy - Pick Your Words Carefully

Keep in mind that the speech you’re writing is meant to be delivered at a funeral. Most of the time, that means no overly verbose phrases or flowery language, but you’ll know your own situation best. Keeping things as simple and colloquial as possible is usually a good thing; you want to think of the eulogy as a sort of monologue in a conversation between you and the assembly. However, it’s important to avoid getting too casual with your speech as well, at the risk of sounding crass or inconsiderate. Remember that there are others in the audience who’re facing this with you, and don’t say anything that might potentially offend someone’s sensibilities or cause them pain. This applies especially to the inclusion of humorous anecdotes; while these can provide some much-needed levity, they’re also just as likely to rub people the wrong way when executed poorly or inappropriately. Another aspect to “picking your words” is including bits and pieces of common and repeated phrases that people might’ve heard from the deceased. These can help lend emotional gravity to your writing, and make it easier for the assembly to connect to what you’re saying.

Make Sure Your Address Is Appropriate for your Station

A husband or wife delivering a eulogy in honor of their partner, or a child mourning a parent, can speak about just about any subject matter so long as they phrase it appropriately. However, these people may not always feel up to the task of delivering a speech, and may ask someone to step in for them. In cases like these, it is important to respect the difference in standing between the person delivering the speech and the person who asked them to deliver it. The same way, if you’ve been tasked with delivering a eulogy for a friend while their family are in attendance, it’s important that you don’t overstep and say things that upset the family.

Maintain a Positive Disposition (or as much of one as you can)

Once again, the passing of a loved one is a decidedly undesirable event. There’s no two ways to put it, and no way to spin it into a silver lining, that’s just how grief works. Always keep in mind that your eulogy’s main purpose is to help soothe the pain that the most important members of the assembly are feeling. This is why you should be extra mindful of these people and what they need to hear from you, both when you’re writing the eulogy and delivering it. With speech writing, it’s a matter of picking the exact right words and putting them in exactly the right place, while when speaking, it’s a matter of how you deliver those words. Especially when you’re covering subject matter that’s on the heavier side of things, you should be aware of the people around you and how your words are making them feel. Taking a moment to pause to collect yourself, or to give someone a kind look and a nod of reassurance, can go a long way towards helping them remain strong. Beyond this, it’s important to balance out the heavier, longer parts of your speech by having briefer, lighter anecdotes in between them. This helps make the speech less emotionally draining as a whole, both for you as a speaker, and everyone present in the assembly.

Don’t Feel Pressured

This applies especially to people who aren’t used to giving addresses, especially during difficult times. You might find yourself getting crushed under the weight of the immense responsibility that’s been placed on you. Nobody’s a “pro” at delivering eulogies, and even if experience were abundant (which it isn’t), no amount of practice can help prepare a person for events when they lose someone important to them.So if you find yourself getting emotional while writing your speech, or you feel like you can’t do justice to the task, be sure to remind yourself that you’re grieving too, and that nothing takes precedent over that. Focus on your emotions regarding the deceased, and try to use those emotions as the basis for your speech rather than adherence to a guide. Don’t try to seek out the perfect words, that’s not what a eulogy is for, and it could take you more time to find these words than you have on hand.

Eulogy Speech Writing Services Can Help Put Your Emotions into Words

We understand that grief is a slow, arduous process, and one that can’t be rushed. If you’re having a rough go at things in the wake of someone’s passing, we can help you find the right words, or at least a worthwhile substitute.

If you’d like to know more about our speech writing services, please give us a call at 1-877-897-1725 or start chatting with our representative today.

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1. Advice and Opinion Pieces

Life advice can be a great way to drive readership up, especially if you've cultivated a following based on opinion pieces. Posts like these give you a chance to form an intimate connection with your readers by providing solutions to their problems. You could talk about anything that relates to your niche. The best thing about advice is that it doesn't require much substantiation, so instead of backing everything up with data, you just have to sit down and think with an open mind. The second best thing, meanwhile, is that advice like this doesn't get old, especially if you’re coming from a place of authority. While things of a time-sensitive nature, such as tech reviews and current events, get dated quickly, the way life works changes very slowly in comparison. So while a two-year-old review of a phone won't be relevant at all anymore, life advice from six years ago will be worth just as much to one of your newer readers.

2. Anecdotal Topics, Drawing from Personal Experience

Similarly to the previous entry, this one relies on the social capital that people associate with your brand name. They'll want to know what you've been doing with your life and the things that have helped shape you into who you are now. Writing about anecdotes from your life allows you to turn journal entries into blog posts. You don't have to read anything, you don't have to premeditate too much either. You just think of an event and let the words go flow. As with life advice, posts like these allow you to develop your writing style, adding and subtracting traits that will eventually help your readers truly identify with that style and brand voice. Since you're also talking about your own experiences here, you're also getting the chance to strike a chord with your audience in a way that few other things can. Giving people a window into yourself helps them connect to your writing, perhaps even relate to it, which is a great way to ensure that they keep coming back to your site for more. Again, because this event is specific to you, the written content will be too, and you don't have to worry about putting your own spin on things or trying to distinguish yourself from everyone else out there. It just comes with the territory by default. Your content writing efforts won't ever get dated because it's an event from your life, and your take on it. As long as you're smart about how you leverage your opinion for your specific audience, people will always be able to find worth in the post, even if the event itself becomes obscure overtime. If you've got the perfect anecdote, but you just can't find the right words to do justice to it, consider tagging us in. Our blog writers have helped many prominent bloggers structure their content to deliver the best possible experience to their readers while also staying true to the essence of the event

3. Focus on Local Events and Attractions

writing about local events If your business has a local element to it, whereby you’re providing services within a geographical area, covering local events or places is a great way to engage potential customers. Every big city's got its own highlights, and you can take a visit to any easily identifiable hotspot and write about it to let your audience know what it's like and what you thought of it. Bonus points if the attraction you're discussing is unique to your locality. If you don't live in a big city and there's not much going on around your town, you can instead foucs on an event and subsequently pivot to a conversation about what’s happening where you are. If you're an avid traveler, blogging about the destinations, your visit, and the attractions within those destinations can be a great source of fresh content - especially if you can adequately capture the essence of that experience and explain it through your words. People are all about secondhand experiences – some might say a desire to live vicariously through others is what got blogging to really take off in the first place.

4. Write About Prevailing Social Issues

This is another type of opinion piece, but it deserves its own entry because it doesn't fall into any other categories. You can write about what you consider an "issue of our time", like climate change, problems relating to modernization and modernized societies, income and gender disparity, and many others. You can pick up any one of these issues and try to paint a clearer picture of them for your audience while also giving your own opinion as well. Tread the line carefully, though. Some topics can carry social importance, so adopting too radical a view may alienate some members of your audience. There's one of two ways to tackle such cases. Its best to adopt a more neutral standpoint that outlines mainstream arguments on either side, but you can also adopt a more candid approach. At the end of the day, it's all about the kind of persona you've built through your blog and how you wish to express yourself. Hot topics do draw big crowds, and your content writing will do well to tap into this.

5. Discuss the Journey of Learning a Particular Skill

blog writing about learning craftsmanship Some businesses, particularly those that have to do with craftsmanship, can use their blog posts to discuss the journey one of their talented professionals took in the pursuit of their craft. If you're a digital agency, you could have a piece written about one of your most senior graphic designers. If you're an independent blogger, you could write about a skill you'd learnt personally. Talk about what motivated you to start, how you developed that interest, and how much you've learnt up till now. Insightful, informative topics covered in a manner that serves to educate your audience are the perfect way for a blog to put out content that helps enrich an audience member's life. That's attention captured, and a reader who'll be returning to your blog to check up on updates in the future. Granted, the journey of learning the skill, or the expertise that goes into providing a particular skill, may become outdated overtime. If it does, you can discussthe evolution of your own craft and the differences between then and now.

6. Write a Fictional Anecdote

Generally, a blog is not fictitious. If anything, a blog is as far removed from fiction as it could be, since blogs deal with aspects of day-to-day life, experience-based accounts from real people. However, a great way to illustrate some abstract point, or demonstrate perspective, is to use a fictional event as the vehicle for it. A narrative is a great way to get readers hooked, and a fictional one is all the better. Rather than typing out your views, why not spin a story between two invented characters that sheds light on the merits of those views. This type of piece might suit some blogs better than others. Depending on how much you enjoy fiction, you could even make a fictional anecdote a regular part of your weekly or monthly offering. Even commercial websites could have a weekly section where the company mascot discusses the latest additions to their product catalogue.

7. Revisit Past Posts That Were Popular

Value added content When you've constantly been churning out content, you've likely revisited the same subject multiple times. Even if yours is a general-purpose blog that, for example, regularly comes up with lists of popular products in different eCommerce marketplaces. Any blog will have callbacks to content that was published earlier. By discussing pieces that received a lot of attention when they were first published, you let newer members of your audience know what they had to offer. In doing so, you're also allowing yourself to hook them with any one of your most popular titles. This strategy lets you capitalize on things that have already worked for you, is what we're saying. But it's about more than just that. If you're talking about technical content, a review of a past article could very well span an article in itself. You could discuss developments since the previous piece was written and address the technical shortcomings of the previous content. In doing so, you show your audience just how dedicated you are to your particular domain and also the depth of your knowledge within that domain. Based on our years of experience writing listicles for various blogs in various domains, we can tell you that a list of the best articles from the past year can be a great way to wrap up a year of great content, and it might just end up being your most popular piece to start off the next. If you'd like, we could even write it for you.

8. Share Your Opinion On Another Person's Opinion (or a Fresh Development).

Pieces like these are great for both establishing the personality of your brand as well as capitalizing on what's already been put out there. Don't forget to take advantage of what we call the trickle-down effect of popular content. If any popular content creator, policymaker, or celebrity comes out with an opinion that gets people talking, you can discuss those opinions for some pretty relevant press. Speaking of relevance, it plays a key role in driving the popularity of such a post. You've got to have a finger on the pulseof current affairs to benefit from pieces like these the most since they tend to have a very short period between having nothing out there regarding the event and being completely saturated with very similar content. For someone running a blog on politics, this can mean competing with other prominent politics and news blogs to be the first on the scene. If you feel up to it, you can even use articles like these to respond to the opinions discussed in the media you're covering. You let your audience know your take on a particular topic, ensuring that everything you're releasing yourself is wholly original. The best part is that in today's day and age, there's a lot of newsworthy developments constantly occurring, so you're not strapped for source material in the slightest. Of course, when you're covering something that's very recent, you can't really predict how much public interest a story will attract. Try to look for big names or popular people. If you're writing a finance blog,you can definitely do a piece on Apple CEO Tim Cook's new salary package and discuss developments in the company (and improvements in profit) since he took the helm.

To Conclude

That was our list of 8 timeless content writing topics. If you'd like to know more about value-added content, find out here. If you'd like to know more about our services and how we can help you revamp your content portfolio, click here to send in an inquiry.

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8 Timeless Content Writing Topics for Your Blog - feature

8 Timeless Content Writing Topics for Your Blog

Are you at a loss for content writing topics for your blog? There are plenty of evergreen topics that suit just about any blog. Read on to find out. 1. Advice and Opinion Pieces Life advice can be a great way to drive readership up, especially if you've cultivated a following based on opinion pieces. Posts like these give you…

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                    [post_content] => Content writing topics

Are you at a loss for content writing topics for your blog? There are plenty of evergreen topics that suit just about any blog. Read on to find out.

1. Advice and Opinion Pieces

Life advice can be a great way to drive readership up, especially if you've cultivated a following based on opinion pieces. Posts like these give you a chance to form an intimate connection with your readers by providing solutions to their problems. You could talk about anything that relates to your niche. The best thing about advice is that it doesn't require much substantiation, so instead of backing everything up with data, you just have to sit down and think with an open mind. The second best thing, meanwhile, is that advice like this doesn't get old, especially if you’re coming from a place of authority. While things of a time-sensitive nature, such as tech reviews and current events, get dated quickly, the way life works changes very slowly in comparison. So while a two-year-old review of a phone won't be relevant at all anymore, life advice from six years ago will be worth just as much to one of your newer readers.

2. Anecdotal Topics, Drawing from Personal Experience

Similarly to the previous entry, this one relies on the social capital that people associate with your brand name. They'll want to know what you've been doing with your life and the things that have helped shape you into who you are now. Writing about anecdotes from your life allows you to turn journal entries into blog posts. You don't have to read anything, you don't have to premeditate too much either. You just think of an event and let the words go flow. As with life advice, posts like these allow you to develop your writing style, adding and subtracting traits that will eventually help your readers truly identify with that style and brand voice. Since you're also talking about your own experiences here, you're also getting the chance to strike a chord with your audience in a way that few other things can. Giving people a window into yourself helps them connect to your writing, perhaps even relate to it, which is a great way to ensure that they keep coming back to your site for more. Again, because this event is specific to you, the written content will be too, and you don't have to worry about putting your own spin on things or trying to distinguish yourself from everyone else out there. It just comes with the territory by default. Your content writing efforts won't ever get dated because it's an event from your life, and your take on it. As long as you're smart about how you leverage your opinion for your specific audience, people will always be able to find worth in the post, even if the event itself becomes obscure overtime. If you've got the perfect anecdote, but you just can't find the right words to do justice to it, consider tagging us in. Our blog writers have helped many prominent bloggers structure their content to deliver the best possible experience to their readers while also staying true to the essence of the event

3. Focus on Local Events and Attractions

writing about local events If your business has a local element to it, whereby you’re providing services within a geographical area, covering local events or places is a great way to engage potential customers. Every big city's got its own highlights, and you can take a visit to any easily identifiable hotspot and write about it to let your audience know what it's like and what you thought of it. Bonus points if the attraction you're discussing is unique to your locality. If you don't live in a big city and there's not much going on around your town, you can instead foucs on an event and subsequently pivot to a conversation about what’s happening where you are. If you're an avid traveler, blogging about the destinations, your visit, and the attractions within those destinations can be a great source of fresh content - especially if you can adequately capture the essence of that experience and explain it through your words. People are all about secondhand experiences – some might say a desire to live vicariously through others is what got blogging to really take off in the first place.

4. Write About Prevailing Social Issues

This is another type of opinion piece, but it deserves its own entry because it doesn't fall into any other categories. You can write about what you consider an "issue of our time", like climate change, problems relating to modernization and modernized societies, income and gender disparity, and many others. You can pick up any one of these issues and try to paint a clearer picture of them for your audience while also giving your own opinion as well. Tread the line carefully, though. Some topics can carry social importance, so adopting too radical a view may alienate some members of your audience. There's one of two ways to tackle such cases. Its best to adopt a more neutral standpoint that outlines mainstream arguments on either side, but you can also adopt a more candid approach. At the end of the day, it's all about the kind of persona you've built through your blog and how you wish to express yourself. Hot topics do draw big crowds, and your content writing will do well to tap into this.

5. Discuss the Journey of Learning a Particular Skill

blog writing about learning craftsmanship Some businesses, particularly those that have to do with craftsmanship, can use their blog posts to discuss the journey one of their talented professionals took in the pursuit of their craft. If you're a digital agency, you could have a piece written about one of your most senior graphic designers. If you're an independent blogger, you could write about a skill you'd learnt personally. Talk about what motivated you to start, how you developed that interest, and how much you've learnt up till now. Insightful, informative topics covered in a manner that serves to educate your audience are the perfect way for a blog to put out content that helps enrich an audience member's life. That's attention captured, and a reader who'll be returning to your blog to check up on updates in the future. Granted, the journey of learning the skill, or the expertise that goes into providing a particular skill, may become outdated overtime. If it does, you can discussthe evolution of your own craft and the differences between then and now.

6. Write a Fictional Anecdote

Generally, a blog is not fictitious. If anything, a blog is as far removed from fiction as it could be, since blogs deal with aspects of day-to-day life, experience-based accounts from real people. However, a great way to illustrate some abstract point, or demonstrate perspective, is to use a fictional event as the vehicle for it. A narrative is a great way to get readers hooked, and a fictional one is all the better. Rather than typing out your views, why not spin a story between two invented characters that sheds light on the merits of those views. This type of piece might suit some blogs better than others. Depending on how much you enjoy fiction, you could even make a fictional anecdote a regular part of your weekly or monthly offering. Even commercial websites could have a weekly section where the company mascot discusses the latest additions to their product catalogue.

7. Revisit Past Posts That Were Popular

Value added content When you've constantly been churning out content, you've likely revisited the same subject multiple times. Even if yours is a general-purpose blog that, for example, regularly comes up with lists of popular products in different eCommerce marketplaces. Any blog will have callbacks to content that was published earlier. By discussing pieces that received a lot of attention when they were first published, you let newer members of your audience know what they had to offer. In doing so, you're also allowing yourself to hook them with any one of your most popular titles. This strategy lets you capitalize on things that have already worked for you, is what we're saying. But it's about more than just that. If you're talking about technical content, a review of a past article could very well span an article in itself. You could discuss developments since the previous piece was written and address the technical shortcomings of the previous content. In doing so, you show your audience just how dedicated you are to your particular domain and also the depth of your knowledge within that domain. Based on our years of experience writing listicles for various blogs in various domains, we can tell you that a list of the best articles from the past year can be a great way to wrap up a year of great content, and it might just end up being your most popular piece to start off the next. If you'd like, we could even write it for you.

8. Share Your Opinion On Another Person's Opinion (or a Fresh Development).

Pieces like these are great for both establishing the personality of your brand as well as capitalizing on what's already been put out there. Don't forget to take advantage of what we call the trickle-down effect of popular content. If any popular content creator, policymaker, or celebrity comes out with an opinion that gets people talking, you can discuss those opinions for some pretty relevant press. Speaking of relevance, it plays a key role in driving the popularity of such a post. You've got to have a finger on the pulseof current affairs to benefit from pieces like these the most since they tend to have a very short period between having nothing out there regarding the event and being completely saturated with very similar content. For someone running a blog on politics, this can mean competing with other prominent politics and news blogs to be the first on the scene. If you feel up to it, you can even use articles like these to respond to the opinions discussed in the media you're covering. You let your audience know your take on a particular topic, ensuring that everything you're releasing yourself is wholly original. The best part is that in today's day and age, there's a lot of newsworthy developments constantly occurring, so you're not strapped for source material in the slightest. Of course, when you're covering something that's very recent, you can't really predict how much public interest a story will attract. Try to look for big names or popular people. If you're writing a finance blog,you can definitely do a piece on Apple CEO Tim Cook's new salary package and discuss developments in the company (and improvements in profit) since he took the helm.

To Conclude

That was our list of 8 timeless content writing topics. If you'd like to know more about value-added content, find out here. If you'd like to know more about our services and how we can help you revamp your content portfolio, click here to send in an inquiry.

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[post_title] => 8 Timeless Content Writing Topics for Your Blog [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-timeless-content-writing-topics-for-your-blog [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 11:06:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 15:06:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2656 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2646 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-25 09:41:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-25 13:41:52 [post_content] => Rules for writing great articles Writing great articles is not a skill you can learn overnight. It may not be something you are born with, but it is definitely something you can master by putting in the hard work. It takes writers years to hone their craft, and even then, they cannot achieve perfection. In fact, it won't be wrong to say there is no such thing as perfect writing. Everyone has a unique way of expressing their thoughts and beliefs. What matters is how their words resonate with others. A good article can educate people about a new idea, whereas a great article can change minds and encourage people to take action. Whether it is something as simple as clicking on a link and making a purchase or something as complex as adopting a new lifestyle, powerful writing carries a lot of weight and is worthy of respect. If you are looking to improve your article writing skills, learning these rules can be a valuable addition to your arsenal.

Rule 1: Know Your Target Audience

Before you put pen to paper – figuratively, of course – you should ask yourself who you're writing for. Now, most people will say they write for themselves. This is often the correct answer because we're our own biggest critics. Nevertheless, whether you are writing an article for affiliate marketing or working on a magazine article, the first thing you need to do is determine your audience. If you write for a pharmaceutical company or a law firm, you must already have a clear idea of who will be reading your copy. However, if you are an employee at a content marketing firm or work as a freelancer, you may have to do a little research to create a reader profile. It will help you understand their interests and motivation to click on your post. You can start by asking yourself the following questions:
  • Who will read this article?
  • Why would they read this article?
  • What will this article do for them?
Once you have found the answer to these queries, you can get a step closer to writing great articles. Try and learn about the factors that may excite your readers and the things that may not sit well with them. Doing so will help you figure out how you can get your audience to see your point of view or buy what you're selling. However, if you want to grow as a writer, don't limit yourself to an ideal audience. Think about other people who may find your article exciting or may connect with it on an emotional level.

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Rule 2: Research, Research, Research

It is always a good idea to write on topics you are passionate about. Be it your love for abstract art or your interest in marine biology, try writing about things that bring you joy. Alternatively, if you have a strong but unfavorable opinion about something, your personal feelings will undoubtedly add some substance to your writing – as long as you don't make your post sound too biased. However, no matter how much you know about a particular idea, make sure to conduct in-depth research before creating an outline for your piece. Read as much as you can. Learn about the history and background of the topic and how others around the world may have perceived it. Many writers allot a specific time frame for their research. In theory, it may work. But depending on what you're writing and who you're writing for, it may not be a good idea to limit your research process to a few minutes. In addition, don't cut any corners. Poor research is among the leading reasons most articles fall flat. On the other hand, good research helps us build our knowledge and facilitates learning. It also makes us more confident in our writing while nourishing our minds. Your research can make or break the article. If you want your words to make an impact, back up your arguments with facts and figures.

Rule 3: Grab the Reader's Interest

Once a person clicks on your article, you merely have seconds to make an impression. Since your title is the first thing a reader sees after opening your post, you must take extra care to make it compelling and interesting. Ideally, your main heading should convey what your article is about without divulging too much. Sound confusing? Well, your title should be an accurate representation of what the reader will find in the content body. However, it should also create an aura of mystique without being misleading. The next thing you should write a short and concise introductory paragraph to draw in your readers. A large chunk of text right at the beginning of an article may distract the reader. Worst case scenario, it may even stop them from reading any further. Therefore, it is pertinent to keep your opening short and attention-grabbing. It doesn't have to be something extraordinary. But it should at least capture the interest of your audience and encourage them to read what you have to say. Consider keeping your intro limited to two or three short sentences. It can even be a one-liner, depending on how well you can craft it. If your words are easy to scan and provide value, there is a good chance your reader will also make an effort to explore the article. Tips for writing articles

Rule 4: Make Your Article Visually Appealing

One of the most significant rules of writing great articles is making them visually appealing. You can create an element of interest by adding stunning photos and informative videos to your content. Moreover, try to incorporate well-explained charts and intriguing infographics wherever you can in your post. Also, if you come across a graphic that is relevant to your article but seems complex, consider taking some time to explain it to your audience patiently. You can also create customized images to make your piece look more professional. It will also help break up the bulky wall of text. Most brands invest extensively to procure graphic designers to develop valuable marketing content. Another way to make your article more attractive is by writing shorter paragraphs. Negative space in between the short paragraphs can help break the visual clutter. It allows your audience to read and digest each point before moving on to the next one. Here are some more ways you can make your pieces more reader-friendly.
  • Cascading subheadings
  • Bold and italicized words
  • Hyperlinks
  • Bullet points
  • Embeds
These factors will breathe a new life into your articles and motivate your readers to spend more time on them. Also, once you are done with writing articles, don't forget to edit and proofread them. Our years of experience in this field have made us pros at writing content for your site. For more information, please feel free to give us a call.

Rule 5: Add Substance to Your Articles

How many times have you found an article on your newsfeed that had a fantastic title but didn't have any substance? Unfortunately, it happens a lot. These click-bait articles are usually packaged as something worthwhile. However, they rarely tell you anything new or valuable. Although these posts manage to fulfil their target by getting more clicks, they leave the readers frustrated and unsatisfied – which is the exact opposite of what you should aim for. After all, one of the most important rulesforwriting great articles is never to leave the reader dissatisfied or craving more. If you want to improve your article writing skills, aim to add value to your words. It should provide new information or a fresh perspective by viewing the topic from a unique angle. Instead of barely scratching the surface, take a deep dive into the subject and look for ideas that require a detailed and nuanced discussion. Your content should solve problems and present solutions. It should connect with people on a deeper level and stimulate their imagination. Creating value-added content will encourage your readers to visit your piece over and over again. Meanwhile, a shallow article may stop them from ever making that effort again. Moreover, if you have a strong opinion, don't be afraid to share it with the world. However, please keep yourself open to criticism and be gracious with the feedback you receive. After all, your readers have a right to agree or disagree with your words.

Rule 6: Don't Water Down Your Words

Want to write with conviction? Don't let your fears hold you back. More often than not, the fear of judgment and criticism refrain writers from reaching their full potential. It is easy to develop a mindset where you don't want to displease your editor or write something that your audience may not fully agree with. As a result, you start using soft language and adopt a pacifying tone. In some instances, it might work in your favor. However, in most cases, it makes your writing look watered down and ineffective. Your message may even get lost in translation if you spend too much energy on creating a perfect post that keeps everyone happy. Therefore, the next time you write an article and have the nagging fear of "what if they don't like it," please immediately push aside those negative thoughts. While it is essential to make sure your words don't spread misinformation, you must not let the fear of disagreement hold you captive. If you believe in a specific cause or an idea, write about it without entertaining any second thoughts. You can't please everyone. It would help if you accepted that there would be times when your message will not resonate with the readers, and that's completely fine. Receiving a negative comment or a harsh criticism may put you in a bad mood for a few hours. But don't let it stop you from writing articles that can add value.

Summing Up the Rules for Writing Great Articles

Writers never stop learning and growing. Hence there is no set formula that will enable you to produce brilliant content. Nevertheless, a few important rules of writing articles can set you on a path to success and help you create content that will stand the test of time. The rules include learning about your target audience, conducting in-depth research, and reeling in the reader with your compelling headline. Moreover, your article must have bullet points, images, graphics, and other visual elements to increase reader engagement. You can also add substance to your articles by asking the right questions and providing the readers with the correct answers. In addition, make sure you write with conviction and never water down your words due to fear of criticism. If you are interested in our article writing service, please drop us an email today. Our talented writers are experienced in all niches and can help you grow your business and reach a larger market segment. [post_title] => 6 Rules for Writing Great Articles [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 6-rules-for-writing-great-articles [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 10:16:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 14:16:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2646 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2643 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-19 08:57:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-19 12:57:30 [post_content] => White Paper writing What is a white paper, and why has this inbound marketing channel become such a key part of online marketing strategies for businesses. Well for one, it is a deep-dive form of content that makes use of reliable resources and case studies with the purpose to educate readers regarding a particular topic. Such content pieces are great for businesses to present themselves as leading experts in their fields and attract other experts and customers to their products or services. Writing and formatting a white paper is in many ways similar to writing an eBook, with the only difference being that whitepaper writing requires a lot more research and knowledge on the given subject. Whitepaper writing requires dedication and a commitment to producing content that is unparalleled. Doing this in one day is a Herculean task best left to experts. This is where our white paper writing service comes in. With a team of expert white paper writers with diverse expertise, you can rest assured; we’ll deliver well above expectations.

Writing a White Paper Quickly

White paper writing 2 The initial part is the hardest mainly because of a load of information at your disposal. Getting lost in this information is highly likely and presenting findings and data without following a narrative is even more so. Luckily, with our tips and tricks, you’ll find the going easier.

1. Topic Selection

When it comes to topic selection, writing on any industry-relevant subject is not a good idea. You need to understand what your audience will connect with the most and how your qualifications come into play. Additionally, it would also help if you chose a topic that was only briefly covered by others. You can also network with experts within your organization or use other crowdsourcing techniques to have a better command of the subject. If you want your paper to get featured on other websites or SERPs, you should focus on creating a unique paper and filling a gap within the content already available. One great way to select a topic is by starting an online poll. Polls will help you get an idea of what your readers are interested in while also getting them excited for an upcoming paper.

2. Target Audience

Your target audience will determine the kind of tone, voice, and research that will be required for the paper. For example, if the purpose of your paper is to attract B2B customers, then perhaps adding technical jargon will not be a problem. However, if your target audience is not well-versed in the subject, you may need to take a different approach. Additionally, you should also focus on relevant keywords and the platforms where the audience will read your content. Choosing specific platforms will also help later on when you’re outlining and formatting the paper.

3. Intro and Conclusion

Why should your readers get excited about reading the paper? The introduction should include a brief description of what the paper includes and why readers will benefit from it. Most readers decide whether they’ll read an entire paper after reading the introduction. So, make sure to grab their attention and tell them why they should continue reading. Address the value of information and the benefits of your paper early on. The conclusion will help readers make a final decision about the entire paper. This section is where you can market the company’s products or services and persuade the audience to take a specific action. Adding business details and a CTA is best left for the outro of the paper.

4. Useful Information

You might see a paper as a perfect opportunity to promote your business and its products or services. However, it'll be best not to forget that the whitepaper's main purpose is to provide useful information and increase your readers’ knowledge. Additionally, this is also your chance to present yourself as a trustworthy industry leader, and a salesy paper will not be sufficient to do that. Use reliable sources, data, and stats and provide expert opinions on them instead of mere advertisements.

5. Keep Building on First Draft

You should draft several copies of the paper down the line to ensure no useful information was left out. You can keep updating the white paper and improving on it even after the first draft is out. One great way to do this is to write several copies and take a fresh outlook each time. You can also have other experts or professionals within the organization give it a read to spot any errors in the document.

6. Grabbing the Readers’ Attention

The technicalities and formalities included in writing a paper can make the tone of it extremely dull. However, instead of focusing on numbers and statistics, you should try adding more value with a perfectly flowing conversation. Keeping your readers’ attention from beginning till the end in a detailed and thorough paper might be difficult. However, as long as you follow the above-mentioned tips, you’ll be able to write a compelling copy.

Formatting a Whitepaper

Formatting a whitepaper When you’re formatting a whitepaper, you should remember to include an easy-to-read and clear title page. The title page will include the subject of the paper, names of experts who have helped create the document, publication date, and author name[s]. You should also divide your paper into headings, subheadings, and sections. This will help you keep your paper organized and provide a better reading experience. Typically, H1 and H2 headings are used in a paper for headings and subheadings, respectively. It’s also pertinent to note that not all pages of your paper need to be text-heavy. You can present highlights, critical details, and takeaways in a separate section of the document. Using colours will also help readers to find important chunks of information. However, remember not to use red, as red is mostly associated with edits in a file. Easy one-pages can also be used for a summary of the text-heavy sections of your paper. Finally, you should also ensure that your paper feels and looks consistent throughout. Typography, colours, and visuals will play an important role in shaping the readers' experience, so it’s also important to give special attention to such elements. The following are some important sections of a typical white paper:
  • Title
  • Abstract
  • Problem statement
  • Background
  • Solution
  • Conclusion
  • References

White Paper Mistakes to Avoid

Whitepaper mistakes to avoid Since white paper includes a lot of research and analysis, it’s always important to keep in mind the mistakes you’re likely to make and should avoid. Keeping this list in front of you will help you focus on the proper direction for the paper while avoiding mistakes that can lead to a poor reading experience for your audience. Let’s take a look at some common paper writing mistakes you should avoid at all costs:
  • Not conducting adequate research.
  • Making it sound like a sales pitch.
  • Not following a narrative or a story.
  • Creating a bad design for the paper.
  • Not providing relevant examples or supporting your arguments.
  • Making last-minute changes.

Types of Whitepapers for Businesses

Contrary to popular belief, this type of content writing is not new. The term was first used in 1922, when the British Government published the Churchill White Paper of 1922. A white paper, if well-written- will give your company a competitive edge and present you with an opportunity to influence readers to pick a particular solution for an existing problem in your industry. White papers are a great way to steer the decision-making process of your current or potential customers in a way that’s beneficial to the business. There are several types of white papers companies can use. Let's take a look at the six most popular styles:

1. Educational

As the name suggests, this white paper is used to inform and educate readers regarding a specific topic in a particular industry. The core function of this content is to provide valuable information and answers to the questions that a company’s customers and prospective customers might have. The focus of this is to teach customers what they don’t already know and present a guide. You can use inbound marketing tactics and write how-to’s or give an in-depth analysis of a new industry or technology when writing an educational white paper.

2. Problem Solving

A problem-solving white paper requires persuasive writing techniques, credible sources, and a mature tone. You should think outside the box to present solutions to a problem your customers might have. Of course, the purpose of this type of white paper is to push out your products and services in a subtle manner. However, in doing that, you should focus on presenting unique ideas and steps to solve a particular problem. Think of the solutions that already exist and how you can cater to the same problems with a different approach. Problem-solving whitepapers are also great for sharing company values and beliefs.

3. Technical

A technical white paper provides technical details about an industry, products, services, or technology. You can offer details of your particular products and how to use them in this document. To strengthen the credibility of your technical white paper, you can also present some visuals and case studies. Typically, the purpose of this document is to attract technical buyers to your particular product or service. Your focus should be on your audience and making the copy error-free, concise, and easy to comprehend.

4. Market Research

A whitepaper based on market research includes an executive summary that highlights important data and provides a professional analysis of it. This document typically includes a lot of graphs and interesting analyses or arguments. Such white papers are excellent for PR, and they can either present trends, highlights, and findings or an argument based on the data presented. You can evaluate recent updates on a particular topic in your industry and present interpretations or predictions based on them.

5. Visionary

Typically used by technology-based companies, this type of white paper shows a reader why a particular business is trustworthy and best for long-term partnerships. This document gives innovative insights and provides arguments for why some products or services will never become outdated. You can also use this copy to showcase the visionary experts who work at your organization.

6. Knowledge Papers

Used for both ATL and BTL campaigns, these papers include a debate-style writing technique that puts you in a credible, authoritative, and visionary position. You can choose to address an existing industry debate or create a new one. However, the focus of this paper will be to make your readers listen, thus making persuasion a critical part of it.

Do You Need Help Creating a Whitepaper for Your Business?

We have several years of experience and a proven track record of customer satisfaction when it comes to creating compelling whitepaper copies for businesses. We provide 100% original content, accommodation for urgent requests, proofreading and editing services, unlimited revisions, 24-hour customer support, and ghost-written copies for all our clients. So, if you’re on the lookout for experts in business, technology, hybrid, or product comparison-related white paper writing services, contact us now by calling (877) 897-1725. [post_title] => Writing and Formatting a White Paper Fast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-and-formatting-a-white-paper-fast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 09:03:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 13:03:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2643 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2636 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-14 08:50:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-14 12:50:30 [post_content] => Title capitalization There are varying and often confusing rules to the use of the English language and none so much as title capitalization. With a language that's so pervasive and commonly used, you're bound to find different schools of thought that define the rules in their own way. When it comes to print media and even forms of online written content, the rules can get even more difficult to ascertain. Specifically, when you talk about writing an article, book or even a social media post – thes rules can get very detailed and all the more elusive. There is an abundance of different style guides out there, and even veteran writers can find themselves making mistakes every now and again. If you've found yourself stumped on your journey towards creating exceptional online content, this guide is for you.

Simple Rules for Title Capitalization

Before we can get into the exact nuances that matter with each style, let's look at the things that most styles have in common. To start off…

Always Capitalize the First and Last Words

Let's start with a fairly straightforward rule. Always capitalize the first and last word of your title, regardless of what those words are. For example: Incorrect: "tips to capitalizing titles" Correct: "Tips to Capitalizing Titles"

Always Capitalize oYur Nouns

While the jury might be out on other parts of speech, all of your mainstream style guides agree that nouns are of great importance in a title. A noun is defined as a word that identifies a class of objectsor a specific instance of that class, where the object in question can be any place, animal, or thing (real or abstract). Common nouns deal with class identifiers, while proper nouns deal with instances. Consider the following sentence: "Hello, my name is Jim." Now it's easy to tell that the word "Jim" carries importance here since it contributes heavily to the sentences communicated. So is the word "name", since it determines what the word "Jim" defines. In this case, "Jim" is an example of a proper noun, while "name" is a common noun, and when you're writing in prose or paragraphs, the rules state that you're only supposed to capitalize proper nouns, while common nouns are left in lower case unless they're starting off a sentence. Titles, however, are different. If there was a title in our sentence, the word "name" would also be capitalized, regardless of whichever style you're using. Pronouns are the same; you shouldn't write words like "I", "You", "We", or "Us" without capitalizing them. Common and proper nouns are both categories of principle words, as are pronouns, so you shouldn't usually leave them in the lowercase. So, in this case, our final statement becomes: "Hello, my Name is Jim" We're gradually getting closer to a statement that would function perfectly as a title, but we're not yet there. Next up…

Always Capitalize Your Verbs, Adverbs, and Adjectives

Words like "my" and "your" can be confusing since they function as different types of speech depending on how they're used. Technically speaking, they're attributive adjectives or adverbs denoting possession. This means that they commute the ownership attributed through a pronoun to a common noun or verb. If "I have a car", then that car, by definition, is "my car". The English language doesn't require you to capitalize your possession bearing adjectives and adverbs while writing sentences, but titles are different once again. All styles, including the APA (American Psychological Association), MLA (Modern Language Association), CMOS (Chicago Manual Of Style, at times, shortened to CMS), and AP (Associated Press) styles require you to capitalize all of your adverbs and adjectives, regardless of their position in a title. So going back to our initial statement, we had: "Hello, my Name is Jim" This now becomes: "Hello, My Name is Jim" Which is our finalized version of the title.

Always Leave Your Articles in Lower Case

Articles are words such as the, a, and an, which tell you whether you're referring to a general or specific object (i.e.the calculator refers to a specific calculator vs. a calculator, which is used to make general statements about calculators). As a rule of thumb, it's good to keep in mind that all articles are left in lower case unless they start or end your title.

The Tricky Part of Capitalizing Your title

Now that we've covered the broad strokes version of what to capitalize and what to leave in lower case let's look at parts of speech that have more intricacies involved.

Prepositions

The first area of contention, which most people tend to have trouble with, is prepositions. Prepositions are words that are usually used before pronouns and other nouns to define relations between objects. So when you say someone "arrived after dinner", or that "they were resting inside the room", the words after and inside are actually examples of prepositions. Other examples of prepositions include in, with, within, without, besides, among, around, above, below, across, against, and many more. Different schools of thought have differing opinions regarding what to capitalize and what to leave in regular case in a title when it comes to prepositions.

APA Citation

Regarding the APA citation style, you're only supposed to capitalize your longer prepositions (four letters or more) while leaving shorter ones in lower case. So when you're dealing with examples such as "A Walk Through the Meadow" you have to capitalize the word "Through", even though it's a preposition and it isn't situated at the beginning or end of your title. However, if you're using a shorter preposition, such as in the case of "A Walk in the Park", the preposition is written in lower case.

AP Stylebook

The Associated Press Stylebook is similar in that you only capitalize longer prepositions.

Chicago Manual of Style

The Chicago Manual of Style is slightly more difficult to deal with regarding what you should and shouldn't capitalize. The general rule is that you should never capitalize any prepositions or conjunctions unless:
  • They're used adverbially or adjectivally
  • They're used as conjunctions
  • They call for emphasis or are stressed upon
The first two rules are fairly direct and leave little room for the imagination. If you're saying"My Clothes are Soaked Through" or "Think It Through", you're using the word ‘through’ as an adverb, and it needs to be left capitalized. Similar is the case above when we talk about "A Walk Through the Meadow". The word through is being used as an adjective in this example, so it'll be capitalized once again. The third rule is a little more ambivalent, so you've got room to be creative in the third scenario. After all, what you choose to emphasize or draw the reader's attention to is entirely up to you as the writer, so you can justify capitalizing prepositions in some cases where they play a critical role in defining the meaning of your title.

MLA Style

The last major style we've got to look at is the Modern Language Association style, most commonly used in liberal arts or humanities texts. MLA advises you to leave all your prepositions in lower case, except when they're being used as subordinating conjunctions. We'll cover the specifics of these in the next section. For now, it's best to just keep in mind that MLA doesn't have a word length requirement when it comes to capitalizing prepositions within your title; if you're dealing with a preposition, leave it in lower case.

Conjunctions

There are two kinds of conjunctions in the English Language: subordinating conjunctions and coordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions are words that join two individual statements of equal relevance and importance. Think of words like "and" and "or"; when you say you'll "have either breakfast or lunch", or when you say that you "intend to visit the barbershop and the tailor", the order in which you use the noun terms is usually unimportant. This is because coordinating conjunctions join together two statements of the same grammatical relevance. One statement isn't a precursor or a prerequisite to the other. Subordinating conjunctions like "before", "after", and "until" are different. If you say"I ate before dusk", it's not the same thing as saying "It was dusk before I ate". In fact, both statements have mutually exclusive meanings. One says that you ate your meal before a certain time, while the other says that a certain amount of time had passed before you got to eat. Both cannot be true together. This is the key difference between subordinating and coordinating conjunctions. Subordinating conjunctions combine two statements where one statement is somehow dependent upon the other, either to show one as a necessary consequence of the other or the exact opposite. There's a lot of overlap between prepositions and subordinating conjunctions, and there're plenty of words (like all three of our examples up there) that function as both conjunctions and prepositions. When it comes to the Associated Press Stylebook or the APA Style guide, you're supposed to never capitalize your conjunctions, regardless of the type, unless they're more than four letters long. When it comes to CMOS and MLA, you can only capitalize subordinating conjunctions but never coordinating conjunctions.

Compound Words

Compound or hyphenated words require some handling if you insert them into your titles, but they're just a few rules you need to be aware of. They're the same for the Chicago, APA, and MLA style guides, so you don't have to worry about remembering different rules for each. To start off, if the compound word consists of two separate individual words that carry meaning, you'll capitalize both. An example of this is "self-report", which would be written as "Self-Report" if part of a title. Secondly, if you're dealing with a hyphenated word that consists of a prefix and another word, you'll capitalize just the prefix and leave the actual word in lower case. So the word "anti-inflammatory" would be written as "Anti-inflammatory". The same also applies to words with a single letter attached as a prefix (such as t-shirt, which would be written as T-shirt). Finally, if you're dealing with a compound word that contains prepositions, articles, or coordinating conjunctions, you'll leave the preposition, article, or coordinating conjunction in lower case while capitalizing the rest of the word as outlined above. So a word such as "holier-than-thou" would be written as "Holier-than-Thou" within a title.

The Final Word

Those are all the rules you need to know when deciding what should and shouldn't be capitalized in your title. Be sure to be mindful that the rules for sentence cases tend to be very different from title cases, and you'll be on your way to producing quality content. Of course, there's more to creating quality content, whether it be an article, book, or blog post, our team of content writers can help. [post_title] => Capitalizing Your Title: The Dos, Don'ts and Details [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => capitalizing-your-title-the-dos-donts-and-details [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 08:52:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 12:52:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2636 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2632 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content] => Tips for magazine article writing Do you wish to see your byline adorning the pages of your favorite publication? Do you want to build a reader base that awaits your next article with bated breath? Well, with a little bit of work, you can take your magazine article writing skills to the next level. The key to writing great magazine articles is to create content that engages from start to finish, and provides value to the reader. Regardless of which magazine you are aiming for, a few tips can help you master your craft and produce articles that any publication in the world would be proud to put out for you. However, before we delve into our tips on writing magazine articles, let's take a moment to understand how this particular form of writing differs from other online content writing.

Magazine Article Writing Vs. Other Forms of Writing

Writing an article for a magazine is not the same as writing one for a newspaper or an online directory. Moreover, the pieces you may see in a magazine are inherently different from the content you may find in journals and books as well. The tone and style of these articles vary with each publication, genre, and topic. However, two things set these pieces apart from other forms of writing – they allow more room for creativity and tend to be more visually appealing. While article writing and book writing also require creative input and critical thinking, drafting magazine articles allows you to play with different visual aspects. The use of colorful graphics and photographs to capture attention becomes a must. Furthermore, the length of magazine articles depends on the publication you’re writing for, what you're writing and who you're writing for. In most cases, writing content for the internet does not come with word count limitations. And insofar as books are concerned, you’re usually your own boss. But to give you an idea, an average magazine article can be anywhere between half a page to a dozen pages. Nonetheless, the word count for 12-page pieces is usually not as high as you'd think since they are interspersed with pictures and advertisements.

Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Connect

article writing Here are some tips on how to create magazine articles that will grab your readers' attention.

1. Write About Things You Are Interested In

You are more likely to create engaging content if you write about something you find intriguing or exciting. Your passion for a specific cause or topic will not only show in your work, but it will improve the quality of the output automatically. Articles written with passion are more likely to connect as they give readers a peek into your heart and soul. If you let your words reflect your love and devotion to the subject of your article, it will convince your readers to trust your judgment and authority. Magazine articles are an excellent medium for talented writers to showcase their skills while playing to their strengths. Moreover, publishers always prefer pieces that have an element of individuality. So, if you are particularly fond of something – be it music, traveling, cooking, or martial arts – make sure to use it as your calling card. However, just because you think you know a topic inside out doesn't mean you should cut corners while conducting research. It is essential to scour the internet and see what others are saying. Also, look for the latest stats and back up your claims with valuable insight.

2. Use Compelling Headings and Sub-Headings

Although this tip is not unique to magazine article writing, it requires a special mention. Your headline is the first thing a reader would see while browsing through the index of their favorite magazine or on the front page of their search engine. It is the focal point of your article, as it draws your readers' attention and encourages them to click on it. Many experts compare a well-crafted headline to a beautiful wrapping paper. However, in reality, it is a gift itself. An excellent headline, paired with equally compelling subheadings, will build the interest of your readers. Therefore, you should put in extra effort to create headlines that perfectly capture the essence of your article without giving everything away. Just make sure they are not misleading. It is also a good practice to include your main keyword in the main heading to make your post easy to discover. We'll discuss more on this later.

3. Reel In the Audience with a Unique Angle

One of the best ways to make your magazine article appealing is by ensuring it has a unique perspective. Start by creating a profile for your target audience and figure out where their interests lie. You can also look at the articles published by your competitors and industry giants. Doing so will help you determine which angles have been discussed before and which require more exploration. Instead of just scratching the surface, dig a little deeper and discover fresh viewpoints that establish you as an expert in the field. Even if you are writing on a mainstream topic, such as a new superhero movie that has recently hit the theatres, focus on the aspects that others have not bothered to explore. Remember, creating value-added content will keep your readers engaged and the publisher happy.

4. Keep It Short, Sweet, and To the Point

Brevity is the soul of any well-written content. If you want your magazine article to remain engaging from the first sentence to the last, you must make it easy to read and understand. It is generally good to use short and simple sentences. You should break your information into small chunks without leaving any room for ambiguity. Of course, depending on the nature of your article, you may have to use a few complex sentences. However, using too many complicated terms and long sentences can distract the readers. Moreover, make sure your readers can follow your train of thought without making much effort. Set the pace to match the article's tone, and don't let your message get lost between long sentences. If your audience finds your magazine article writing skills tedious or frustrating, there is a good chance they won't come back for more. Apart from using short and concise sentences, ensure your paragraphs don't exceed six lines. Adding bulleted lists to your content can also make it easy to skim and comprehend, attracting the readers.

5. Include Visual Elements

Break up huge chunks of text with striking pictures, powerful graphics, and well-explained charts. Including valuable visual elements in your magazine article is a foolproof way to increase audience engagement. They will give your audience a chance to rest their eyes without taking their attention away from the piece. With the right images, you can explain your idea or perspective without saying a lot. Additionally, photos and videos can make your content more memorable. They can help your readers interact with the piece, which may also increase their willingness to return to it. These are among the leading reasons why most publishers and brand owners invest extensively on graphic work to support their written content. How to write articles for magazines

6. Get Your Audience Involved and Invested

Starting your magazine article with a thought-provoking question or a shocking fact can help you grab the interest of your audience from the get-go. If your question is something that your readers can relate to personally, it will undoubtedly compel them to read further. However, to draw the attention of your readers, you must understand their desires and pain points. You should also know about your audience's gender, age, and location to choose your article's right style and tone. After all, the ideas that may intrigue women aged 30 to 45 are not likely to resonate with men aged 50 to 65. Furthermore, always address your readers directly. Writing in the second person will allow you to use words such as "you,” "your," and "yours." Your readers should feel as if you have written the article just for them. Once they build that connection, they'll stay hooked until the very last page. Also, make your piece sound like a discussion one would have with their friend. It shouldn't come across as a lesson or an essay. This magazine article writing tip will surely help your audience feel like a part of the narrative.

7. Don't State Facts, Tell a Story

Storytelling is an art. While anyone can share factual information, it takes expertise and a unique thought process to tell a story. As a writer, your biggest priority should be keeping your readers on their toes as they take in your words and build a world of their own. Whether you are writing about politics or deep-sea diving, your anecdotes and experiences can set your article apart from the rest. Sharing small stories also allows your audience to connect with you on an emotional level. It makes you and your words more relatable. People may not remember the statistics you've shared in your article. But they are most likely to remember the tidbits from your personal life that made their way onto the page. To create compelling content, take inspiration from your past experiences or create fictitious scenarios to leave your audience spellbound. You can also use analogies, quotes, and pop culture references to breathe a new life into your content.

8. Choose Your Keywords Wisely

Magazines are no longer limited to the print medium. You can now access almost every magazine online, with some charging a small subscription fee and others allowing you to read their content for free. Now, you may have heard that we should write for people and not the search engines. Our question is, why not write for both? Creating compelling and engaging content is just not enough. You also need to make your articles discoverable. Search engine optimization or SEO is the most effective way to make sure your audience finds your posts. You need tofind out what people are looking for and incorporate those keywords into your article. According to the SEO best practices, your main keyword should appear at the article's beginning, middle, and end. You can also include two to three additional keywords throughout the content. It will increase the chances of your article ranking higher on Google.

9. Wrap It Up Nicely

Don't let your closing statement go to waste. As you wrap up your article, utilize the last few lines to include a CTA call to action. It is essentially a way for you to tell your readers what to do next. Whether you are looking for feedback or want your audience to check out your latest video series, make sure to include a relevant link that directs them to your preferred webpage or service. The next step is to edit your content. You can use services such as Grammarly or Copyscape to ensure your article is free of mistakes and plagiarism. This is also your last opportunity to format the piece and ensure no negative spaces or weird indentations. Moreover, please use different font sizes for headings, subheadings, and body to increase readability and engagement. You can also use bold words and italicized sentences to make your critical ideas more prominent.

Magazine Article Writing Made Easy

To conclude, there are no set rules to writing a compelling magazine article. However, the tips mentioned above will enable you to break the mold by producing great content. A wisely chosen topic with a unique perspective and great headline can do wonders for your career. Similarly, short and clear sentences sprinkled with personal anecdotes can make your article more fun to read. If you feel a little lost in how to do go it alone, our article writing service could be the order of the day. Our team of experienced article writers ably supported by our team of expert designers can help you create magazine articles that hit the right note every time. [post_title] => 9 Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Hook Readers from Start to Finish [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 9-tips-for-writing-magazine-articles-that-hook-readers-from-start-to-finish [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2632 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2622 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-29 06:30:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-29 10:30:30 [post_content] => how to write product descriptions A compelling product description is crucial to the success of your eCommerce business. For those of you that don’t know, these are essential pieces of marketing copy that describes your product’s features and benefits to potential customers, persuading them to buy. Excellent product descriptions accurately capture the essence of a product to influence purchase decisions. In other words, they can well be the back bone of your online business’s success. Most entrepreneurs and marketers struggle with writing powerful product descriptions that can convert casual bowsers into life-long customers. They craft their copies around factual information and don't focus on the fact that they are selling an actual product to a real person. As a result, most product descriptions look like a block of information you are likely to find at the back of a product label. Below, we have put together some tried-and-tested tips on how to write a product description that converts.

1. Define Your Target Audience

Before you start writing a product description, you must understand the persona of your potential buyer. Defining your target audience can help you address them directly and engage them in a conversation. You can only create an impactful copy if you know who you're writing for and what would compel the reader to buy your product. It is also important to remember that the features that may entice one demographic might not be valuable to the other. Moreover, knowing your audiencecan help you select the right words and answer the right questions. It also enables you to find the perfect tone for the product.For example, you may want to inject humor into a product description for Christmas sweaters, but you can't use the same writing style to sell medical equipment or something more serious, such as coffins. Narrowing down the consumer characteristics can help you draft a copy that is equal parts informative and persuasive. If your product description addresses the pain points, values, interests, and frustrations of your buyers, there is a good chance they'd be willing to spend their hard-earned money on it.

2. Focus on Benefits over Features

Agreat product description must include all the information a buyer may need to make a purchase. It should tell the customer about the unique specifications of your product that set it apart from the rest and share any technical facts that may influence their decision. However, you must also understand that the features you are excited to write about might not necessarily interest your target audience. Some of them may even find it boring. The best way to retain customer attention and capture their interest is by explaining how the product will benefit them. Your copy should describe the advantages of a product and tell the buyer how it will reduce their pain points or enhance their quality of life. Before you start writing a product description, list down the top features of the item you are selling and then translate them into substantial benefits. Moreover, to prevent your copy from looking like an advertisement, refrain from using superfluous words. It would be best if you also avoided using superlatives that you can't justify. Following this tip will help you how to write a description that converts into a sale.

3. Elicit Emotions through Storytelling

A strong product description provides the buyers with all the relevant details and impacts them emotionally. According to a 2009 research study,holding a product in hand increases a person's desire to buy or own it. However, since they can't physically touch your product through their screens, your job is to paint a vivid picture that also packs an emotional punch. If you want your product descriptions to convert, make sure your content tells a story that your potential buyers can connect with. You can set the scene by telling them who created the product and what inspired them to do so. Taking the buyers on the journey of developing the product will allow them to relate to it. Depending on what you're selling, a personal anecdote or an entertaining fact about the product may also increase the buyer's interest. Nonetheless, you must make sure your words don't come across as dishonest or insincere. On the contrary, your story should enable customers to envision the product and how it would add value to their life.

4. Make It Sound like a Real Conversation

conversational product descriptions It may be tempting to sprinkle your product description with fancy words and literary references, but doing so can potentially turn away your customers. So, if you want the buyers to connect with your product emotionally and ultimately buy it, consider adopting a natural tone and using simple words. Ideally, a product description should sound like a conversation between friends. It should flow smoothly and have a life of its own. Instead of making sweeping statements, you should inform your buyers about the features and benefits just like you would share with a friend or a loved one. The customer should feel like you have their best interest at heart and that your words are not merely transactional. Product descriptions that use natural language and a friendly tone can help your eCommerce business  build a loyal customer base. Potential buyers are more likely to purchase if they find your copy to be honest and genuine. It would also help you stand out from the competition and make your products more memorable. If you need help writing product descriptions that sell, please feel free to give us a call.

5. Be Mindful of Power Words

Did you know there are certain words you can include in your product description to elicit a response from your target audience? More often than not, business owners and marketers end up using words such as "revolutionary" or "innovative"to describe a product when it is anything but that. Instead, sprinkle your copy with descriptive words and adjectives that may excite or intrigueyour prospective buyers. For example, if you are writing a product description for a dress, you can replace the terms "pretty" and "high-quality" with "sensational"and"luxurious." According to David Ogilvy, here are some of the most influential words that can turn a casual reader into a buyer.
  • Suddenly
  • Now
  • Announcing
  • Introducing
  • Amazing
  • Sensational
  • Revolutionary
  • Miracle
  • Magic
  • Quick
  • Hurry
Using these power words can take your product description to the next level.

6. Make Your Copy Easy to Scan

A great product description is easy to read and understand. Instead of explaining your product in lengthy and complex paragraphs, consider using simple sentences that get the message across. Customers have a notoriously short attention span when it comes to making online purchases. So, the best thing you can do to keep them interested in your product is to present them with a description that they can scan. For example, you can break down product specifications into bullet points to make them more reader-friendly. Moreover, different font sizes and lots of white space can help break the visual clutter. Your buyer shouldn't have to sift through long pieces of writing to find valuable information. Instead, you should present it to them on a figurative silver platter. Incorporating the product's name into the heading and using highlighted words can also impact the reader's attention span. If you’re struggling to create quality product descriptions at scale, our product description writing service might be what you need.

7. Optimize for Search Engines

Optimize your product descriptions for Google Search Including specific keywords in your product descriptions can help improve your search engine optimization (SEO). This will ultimately increase your chances of ranking high on the search results page. If you want to draft a conversion-oriented copy, make sure to do a little bit of keyword research to find out what the customers are searching for. Once you have found suitable keywords, integrate them and their variations into your content. The SEO best practices suggest placing keywords in the page titles, Meta descriptions, and image tags.  For good measure, include the main keyword at the top and bottom of your page to ensure your customers can easily find your product. It is also worth mentioning that your content should not be stuffed with keywords, as it may make your product description look unauthentic. The goal of optimizing your product description is to help gain new customers. Adding relevant keywords will allow prospective buyers to discover your brand and learn about its values with a few simple clicks on their device. Furthermore, adding relevant tags to product images also carries a lot of weight with search engines, which takes us to our next tip on how to write a product description that compels customers.

8. Always Use Quality Images

As the wise adage goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. If you want to master the art of writing excellent product descriptions, you cannot compromise on the quality of images. As mentioned above, customers cannot physically see or touch your product. While your words can help them envision how the product may look or feel, adding a good image along with your text can actually encourage them to buy it. It is one of the essential parts of a powerful product description. Most high-end brands hire professionals to create stunning photos and videos that capture all the best features of their products. However, spending precious resources on such services may not be feasible for new startups and small businesses. Instead of focusing too much on what your competitors are doing, divert your energy to take a few quality photos that enhance your product and effectively display its unique specifications. As long as your image is large, clear, and in line with the overall theme of your brand, there is a good chance that it will manage to convert readers into buyers. The accompanying copy should also create imagery that entices the customer into imagining what it would be like to hold or use the product.

What a short video regarding product description importance

Our Final Thoughts

Those were our best tips on how to write a product description that compels potential customers to make a purchase. If you are an entrepreneur or a small business owner looking to create brand awareness and improve your conversion rate, our team of content writers is ever-ready to help. To find out more about our services, contact us today. [post_title] => How to Write Compelling Product Descriptions that Convert [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-compelling-product-descriptions-that-convert [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:37:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:37:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2622 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2616 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content] => Bio Writing We’ve all had to be introspective at some point, especially when you’re looking to put yourself out there through a professional bio. You’ve likely thought about who you are or what qualities you embody. You’ve thought about your achievements.  Thinking to yourself is one thing, though, and writing it down for an external audience is entirely another. On the surface, it should be fairly simple. It’s a short paragraph or two describing your professional journey so far and where you intend to take it. But then why do so many people struggle to write a bio that adequately captures who they are? We’ve put together a checklist of the things that combine to make a great bio. To start off:

Start Strong

In many ways, the most important part of your blog is the opening section. A strong introduction not only reels your readers in, it can also serve to highlight the strongest aspects of your repertoire. Those first few lines need to be absolutely spot on to prompt the person reading to continue, so don’t skimp on your trial and error. Try out as many opening lines as you can think of if you feel like your current iteration could be better. Be confident, be honest, and don’t hesitate to strut your stuff. The opening lines are all about making an impact, and there’s a variety of ways to do this. You can open with humour, you can open with an achievement that speaks for itself, or you can open with a reference. There’s room to experiment, so there’s no excuse for trying as hard as you can to think of what fits your bio best.

Be Partial Towards Recent Developments, but Don’t Hesitate to Discuss How Got You Here

Like a resume, the more current your bio is, the better. Make sure you include a sentence or two that tells people, at least vaguely, about where you are now and what you’re doing. It lets prospective interests know what you’re doing these days and whether your skillset is relevant to them. While you might be tempted to list events in order of recency, don’t do that. Not every post is important, and not every move significant. Instead, if there’s a turning point in your professional development, such as a time when you switched fields three years ago, you’re better off addressing that. It’s not as if you’ve got room to be long-winded, but you should still discuss what prompted the switch, so long as you were positively motivated. You can sneak in a line or two about how your prior experience empowers you in your current line of work as well.

Decide on a Tone and Keep It Consistent

A bio is a concise description and one that sees many iterations as your career evolves and your professional development progresses. If you’re used to cutting out and adding in individual lines (and even if you’re not), it’s good to give the whole thing a read over to see if you’re consistent. While the right tone for you will depend entirely on what career you’re in and how you’re most comfortable expressing yourself, there are certain pointers. You shouldn’t be arrogant or overly informal; it’s much better to phrase your brags as subtly as possible and maintain a polite disposition. Achievements are more effective when mildly understated than they are when blown out of proportion, so make sure you maintain a humble tone. Humor isn’t necessarily off the cards, but you have to balance it out with serious statements. Also, your best bet is tongue-in-cheek humor rather than something that might risk offending someone; remember, this is a professional piece. Consistency also extends to whether or not you’re writing in first-person. Don’t go from I to they (first to third-person), or skip the pronoun altogether (implied the first person). This of course is easier said than done, and if it’s not for you – there is no shame in hiring professional bio writers instead.

Don’t Forget to Inject some Personality into Your Writing

personality in your bio One of the most typical mistakes when writing a bio is being too formulaic in your approach. You find something that really works, so you copy the same structure or type out the entire thing in as neutral a tone as possible. Nothing which worked for someone else needs to work just as well for you. Your Bio should be like your fingerprint, abstractly similar but entirely unique in itself. You have an entire lifetime of experiences at your disposal, so be sure to showcase as much of them as you can, as positively as you can. Your writing conveys not only your experiences but also aspects of your outlook and who you are. You shouldn’t shy away from including stuff about your innermost goals and motivations to the extent that you’re comfortable. While you shouldn’t be too flowery in your use of language, don’t be afraid to use more complicated terms where there is merit to them.

Always Double Check Guidelines

The platform or portal you’re submitting your bio to might have specific guidelines for what’s considered a valid submission. Always make sure that you check all the boxes and that you haven’t included anything that they’ve disallowed. This also means that you won’t be able to submit the same exact bio to every single prospect, but that should be standard practice as it is. Make sure you tailor your bio to the sort of opportunity you’re on the hunt for to give yourself the best possible chances.

Be Concise

Top the point writing We’ve already discussed how you shouldn’t pad your bio, but there’s more to a good bio than just keeping things simple. Your bio is meant to be a rich summary of your recent professional experiences, but you don’t need to mention every single thing you’ve already mentioned with your resume. This brings us to another point: you should try to keep repetition between your bio and your resume to a minimum. That’s not to say there should be no overlap at all, but rather, that your bio should only further explore the most important parts of your resume, the parts you want a potential employer to focus on. By emphasizing those tenures, you can draw attention to aspects of your development that may not have been adequately represented as just another bullet point in your CV or LinkedIn profile.

Don’t List Your Achievements

Recall what we said about trying to keep yourself sounding as down to earth as possible. If your bio reads like a list of things you’ve accomplished, you’re not doing it right. Instead of leading every statement with what you are or what you’ve achieved, try to pivot to what you have to offer someone you’d want to establish a professional relationship with. Instead of talking about your skills and how you’ve acquired them, talk about what those skills can accomplish for someone working with you. People want to see what value you bring to the table, so making your bio about what you have to give, rather than just what you have, is a great strategy to employ.

Add a Personal Touch

We’ve already discussed the importance of abandoning the formulaic approach, but a great bio goes further than that. A bio should demonstrate more than just professional experience; it’s a representation of who you are. As such, you can’t expect to paint a clear picture of yourself by talking about your career alone; you can and should include references to personal triumphs and milestones. We’re obviously not talking about detailed narrations (you don’t have the words to spare, nor that much creative license), but you can definitely include distilled versions of them. Simply mentioning that you’re an aquaphobe learning how to swim, for example, can tell your employer plenty about the fact that you take adversity on the chin and that you have a mind to surmount obstacles. Personal touches like these help highlight crucial aspects of your personality that might help distinguish you from other applicants, so it’s a good idea to include something about your life. Another way you could benefit from a personal addition is to use it to demonstrate your more personable traits. This could be through humor, or a line or two about your charitable pursuits, or just what you enjoy doing in your free time. Either way, it helps paint you as more than just a robot with work experience, so be sure to make the most of it.

Maintain a Balance

So you’ve got to include aspects of your personality, personal pursuits, career progression, and current state of employment. While adequately covering all of those focus areas, you also have to flow so that your bio doesn’t read like a series of disconnected statements. And you have to keep to a very strict word count while doing all of the above. This can prove daunting, even for the best of us, and that’s why bio writing is more art than science. It’s also why revising your bio is a very tedious process that can involve hours of brainstorming with very little to show for it.

Watch a short video to learn more about What is a Biography

Bio Writers to Make Your Look Like a Million Bucks

If you’ve been having trouble with figuring out just the right words to put in your bio, or you’re second-guessing what your bio should look like – our team of Professional Bio Writers can help. From techies to published authors, finance execs to teachers – our versatile team of bio writers understands what every bio needs and delivers. [post_title] => How to Write the Perfect Professional Bio [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-the-perfect-professional-bio [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2616 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2608 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-15 06:51:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:51:31 [post_content] => writing SEO friendly content Search engine optimization, or SEO, as it may be known to most of you, is a rapidly evolving discipline that has been on the rise ever since Google took the world of search engines by storm. Accoridngly, learning how to write SEO-firendly articles is number one on the checklist of content producers that want to ace SERPs.

Keep Up-to-date with Google

Last year, Google announced the addition of core web vitals and page experience signals as ranking factors in search results. We won't get into too much detail about what these are specifically just yet, but you should know that your core web vitals tell Google how quickly and smoothly a page loads in front of a user. The other page experience signals are, more or less, boxes you need to check regarding the security of your connection with your users, and that they're being delivered a quality experience that isn't overly annoying or outdated. All we mean to do with the above is highlight that the field of search engine optimization is constantly evolving. With Google needing to constantly roll out updates to combat people finding shortcuts to ranking better (such as black hat backlinking practices) or breaking ranking factors altogether and using them for gaming the system (such as keyword cramming). While Google does come out with its SEO guidelines to help people understand how they can improve their website and put out content in a way that helps them rank better, what Google does not do is tell you exactly how searches are ranked and how much each individual metric contributes to your overall ranking. For all of these reasons and others, keeping up with all of the advancements taking place within the field of SEO can be a difficult task, even for those of us that call SEO their bread and butter.

Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content

If you've tried learning how to do your own SEO before, and you found the process to be too tedious or difficult, then this article is for you. Not only will we go over exactly how you can go about making your content SEO friendly, we'll also let you know key tips and tools you can use to help you with the process.

Tip 1: Select the right topics to write about

A great way to make a splash on those Search Engine Ranking Pages (SERPs) is to select topics that are currently garnering interest amongst the public. Even if your website or business's actual domain area isn't the most popular, get creative and find ways to link it to those popular topics. Remember, even the best-written content won't garner views if you're writing about something that no one wants to read about. This is where learning how to use Google Trends for SEO could be beneficial. Content marketing strategies are great and all, but you'd have to be a magician to get people to read an article they have no interest in. If you're worried that focusing on topics of interest will have you competing with industry giants for rankings, don't be. Remember, recency is also a factor in search results ranking, so simply the fact that you're posting your stuff today is going to get you at least some preferential treatment. And if your stuff is original and out of the box, providing a fresh perspective or some expertise that can't be found elsewhere, that's going to push you up even further. Besides, you shouldn't be worried about the competition anyways; SERPs are full of examples of Davids who counter Industry Goliaths, and the next one might just be you. As long as you can focus on providing quality experience to your users (and do so consistently), it'll always shine through sooner or later. Of course, this is where our article writing service can give you the leg up.

Tip 2: Keyword research is still paramount (and probably will continue to be for at least a while)

SEO-friendly content needs strong keyword research There's one aspect of SEO that hasn't changed much over the years: Using high-interest keywords still helps you rise to the top of rank results. You should make it a routine practice to check out keyword rankings relating to your topic area, once before you've written your piece and once after it's done, right before you publish. Why before you publish? To make sure you haven't overused your keyword or used too many keywords in your text. A piece that's 500 words long shouldn't try to target ten different keywords, and it shouldn't contain fifteen instances of your primary keyword. Black hat hacks like these were popular during the early years of SEO, but Google's done plenty to prevent them from being viable today. Don't fall victim to your own bad practices. For a standard guideline regarding how many instances of a particular keyword should be in an article:
  • Keep yourself to two to three instances at most for a 500-word article
  • Add one for each additional 500 words when it comes to longer articles.
According to this directive, a 2000 word piece should contain six instances of a particular keyword. Naturally, if your keyword is a generic term, you might find yourself using it a bit more, and that's okay, but try to avoid being too repetitive with it. Try for synonyms or abbreviations, anything you can do to avoid making it seem like you've crammed; if you can tell, chances are Google can too. Aside from this, try to be as strategic as you can with your keyword use. Don't rush to put out a piece relating to each popular search term you can find that's relevant to your business. There's such a thing as Keyword Cannibalization; it's where your own articles are competing with one another for the same keyword and actually taking traffic away from one another. We're sure we don't need to spell it out for you, but this isn't a good thing. When it comes to terms that are highly relevant to your website, try to put out long-form content that covers as many aspects of the term as you can, rather than rushing to release content relating to every term people could possibly search for. Be strategic with your content; it will pay dividends in the long run. Oh, and speaking of being strategic…

Tip 3: Plan out an approach to content that lets you make the most of different types of articles

Google and other search engines tend to love websites that are regularly updated. This means releasing daily content for many website owners, even if that content is just a rehashed version of an article they'd put out the previous week. This might work for some people, but it certainly isn't a surefire way to succeed with your content. If you're going to have to repeat yourself eventually, and you know it, you should plan out your topics so that you maximize the amount of time there is between two similar articles. You can use the time in between to figure out how you can cover the same topic or domain area from a different perspective.

Struggling for Ideas? Well, that’s what professionals are for. Our diverse team of content writers are not only well-versed with creating compelling and unique content – but at scale.

Another way to keep things fresh is to cover topical, time-sensitive developments within your focus area. For example, you can write a long-form cornerstone article on content writing best practices, and that article can remain the same for a long while. Instead of writing about that topic again, you can later release content about how opinion pieces are the way to go in 2021 and fill that article with reasons for why perspective based content is especially relevant after we've all experienced a lockdown that cut us off from being exposed to other opinions. While opinion pieces don't inspire the sort of trust that a faultless factual piece might, they're excellent for increasing engagement and getting people talking in your comments section. There's no real substitute for user engagement and no second-guessing the fact that search engines are partial towards content that engages readers, so why not experiment a bit and get creative. And creativity doesn't just have to do with how and what you write about.

Tip 4: Use every channel (and platform) at your disposal to make people aware of the content you're publishing

social media like facebook is key for SEO content Social Media is a great way to get more eyes on your content. If an article on your site isn't getting the traction you'd want it to, posting a link to the article on your business's Facebook page along with a captivating tagline or quote from the article might be just the thing to get those numbers up to desirable levels. More clicks mean more views, and more views mean preferential treatment within search results, so don't be shy about plugging your content wherever you can. There was a time when businesses just needed to have a listing in the Yellow Pages, but that time has long since passed. Now businesses are everywhere, from Facebook and Instagram to Twitter and LinkedIn. There's no reason your business shouldn't have a face on each and every one of these platforms. If you pay enough attention to what works on each of them, you might just find that one, in particular, is extremely conducive to the type of content you're putting out and gets you more traffic than the rest of them. Once you know this, you can start focusing more on generating more content for that platform and using that content to generate more traffic for your e-commerce website or storefront. A content writing service can be your saving grace here. Getting people to your content isn't everything though, you've also got to think about where people are going from your articles…

Tip 5: Make sure you put the right links in your content (and the right type of links as well)

Everyone knows not to link to their competitors. But if you've been in the content game as long as we have, you might also know that you can't just back up your own content with any material you can find that supports your claims. There's a LOT of repetition on the Internet. You can Google any topic and find twenty different articles all saying the same thing using slightly different words. You might think that linking to any one of them serves the purposes you need for your articles, but that just isn't true. So what then, do you link to the best written of those articles? Not always. Informational content, such as the stuff you'd find on a .edu or .gov site. .Org sites are good, too, as long as the article you're linking to isn't trying to sell something itself. SEO-friendly content is written with the intent to inform and it always tends to rank better and contribute more to the credibility of what you're saying than content that has an ulterior motive. Keep that in mind while you're selecting which articles to link to. Credible links get your website more "Authority". Authority is a holistic metric that determines how much clout you have within your domain or focus area. Quality internal links also help you gain authority since users can jump from article to article within your site without finding redundant or otherwise fruitless content. But if you're too liberal with your external links (i.e. links that lead out of your site) you can end up losing authority to the pages you link to. This isn't always a bad thing, but you should try to use "no follow" links for at least some of your outbound links for this reason. No-follow links prevent crawlers from passing authority along from your site to the site you're linking to.

SEO-Friendly Content by Experts

If you've enjoyed this list of SEO-friendly practices to help your website take off, consider reaching out to us to find out more about what we can do to help revamp your content portfolio. We've got years of experience in the industry and a long list of satisfied clientele to back us up, so why not give us a call. [post_title] => Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content to Gain Visibility on Search Engines [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => tips-for-writing-seo-friendly-content [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-15 06:53:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:53:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2608 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2598 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-08 08:17:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-08 12:17:26 [post_content] => Hire professional transcribers Speech recognition has come a long way and has been one of the leading developments in reach towards the Internet of Things. Now, with Google Home and Amazon’s Alexa, we can control just about any aspect of room ambience without moving an inch. While services like these might lead you to believe that speech recognition has evolved to the point where human transcription just doesn’t make sense anymore, we’re still far from being there yet. We’re not saying that speech recognition hasn’t grown by leaps and bounds in the past decade or so, far from it, in fact, it’s just that it’s not quite gotten to the point where it can be considered as reliable as the human mind. In other words, if you want accurate transcriptions where context, punctuation and accents are accounted for, going for a transcription writing service is your best bet. Before we can explore a comparison between these two methods, let us take a look at what both are:

Hiring Professional Transcribers Over Speech Recognition

Manual transcription is fairly straightforward. A person listens to an audio recording and jots down the contents; there isn’t much to explain there. To understand why human beings are better at this task, we must first understand how we interpret language. The human mind is a multi-track processor. This means that it can selectively and intuitively utilize multiple processes towards the same end, switching freely between those processes as the need arises. The most powerful tool we have at our disposal when it comes to understanding speech is the flexible use of context. We can glean details about the subject conversation like several speakers, roles in the conversation, subject matter, and key points, just from listening to the conversation for a small amount of time. Even if there are noisier sections, we can pause, rewind, and play again until we arrive at a reasonable guess for what is being said. If that doesn’t work, we can continue further along in the conversation and figure out what might have gone in a particular section through later references.

How Accurate is Speech Recognition

ASR, or Automated Speech Recognition, is the domain of computer science and technological research that deals with getting computers to understand the spoken word. In an ideal scenario, where you’re dealing with clean (noiseless), high fidelity audio, a computer can indeed measure up to human standards and even compete with top-notch transcribers. Just so you can compare, the human error rate during audio transcription is about four percent, while these artificial intelligence-based technologies usually hover around the five percent mark. That means that they’re almost as good if only slightly worse, than humans at transcribing audio. The ball game shifts a bit when we talk about LVCSR (Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition). These applications are categorized by an extremely large vocabulary of words and fluid conversation between multiple speakers. When it comes to these scenarios, the error rate for humans is still at roughly four to five percent, while their technological counterpart measures in at roughly 8 – 10 percent. An accuracy rate of 10 percent means an error every 10 words, which is far beyond the acceptable amount. But real-world applications are much, much worse. Say you have a phone call or a voice note you’d like transcribed. The background noise can make certain words hard for the speech recognition software to detect, but that’s to be expected. In computer science terms, when you use the word “noise” you’re actually describing different elements that obscure the quality of a particular frame (in the case of audio and video). Noise can come from various sources and increases as you increase volume and distance from the audio capture device. But noise isn’t just an environmental factor, at least not in traditional terms. You see, when we communicate over telephone lines, the audio signal generated by our voices is actually converted to an electrical signal, which travels across large distances and is then converted back into audio for us to hear. These conversions minimize line loss and maximize distance, allowing us to make phone calls across the world. However, “minimize” is a relative term here; while we can hear and understand a person speaking on a phone call, a computer might not be able to do the same. There are certain aspects of speech recognition that computers truly excel at. They’re many magnitudes of times faster, and as such, some programs can sift through hundreds of hours of audio in the time, it would take a human being to complete working on a one-hour transcription. However, to mimic a process as complex as understanding human speech, a computer must break it down into individual tasks. Preprocessing, feature extraction, acoustic modelling, language modelling, and decoding are all individual steps in a process designed to achieve the same results as human listening, but that doesn’t mean that both work in the same way.

Why Hiring a Transcription Service is the Better Option

This fluid use of context and a wider understanding of the way objects are related in the world gives human transcribers an edge over conventional computer-based means. Again, even the most advanced neural networks only attempt to mimic our faculty of working with context, and this mimicry is subject to our own understanding of how our mind works, which is admittedly limited. Systems designed by us to do something our minds do, when we ourselves only have a rudimentary understanding of the internal workings of the human mind, cannot reach the level of accuracy that a professional who has listened to thousands of hours of audio can offer us. Meanwhile, a computer application will break the process down into multiple simple steps, and by the end of all these processes, arrive at a transcription. While we did mention each of the steps that a hypothetical speech recognition tool could take to recognize patterns in speech, knowing what each of these means isn’t necessary for the purposes of this article. You need to know that certain aspects of spoken language don’t necessarily translate very well to the machine equivalent of the listening process. The main issues are as follows:

Punctuation

It can be difficult to determine how to punctuate a sentence heard over the phone or out of context, even for human transcriptionists. However, because we have a wider understanding of linguistic rules to work with, we can easily make educated guesses about where to put commas, periods, and semicolons and where to swap out a period for an exclamation mark, for example. A computer, meanwhile, can only attempt a verbatim transcription, which completely ignores punctuation within a sentence most of the time. What you’re left with is a mess of words separated by no more than a few sparse periods.

Filler Words and Offhand Sounds

These areother aspects of transcription that software fails to reliably account for. Filler words are commonly used unintentionally during the fluid speech, with the most easily explainable reason for their presence being a person struggling to reach for their next word. A program will not be able to distinguish that a person saying “what’s the word?” is actually trying to recall a word they can’t remember and will instead transcribe that phrase along with what was said previously. It sounds like “oh”s and “ah”s are just as difficult for computers to ignore, and they can make many initial drafts seem like gibberish to the intelligent reader. Characteristics of speech like a lisp or a stutter are no different from filler words and sounds. In fact, if anything, these are much worse, as they can affect even words the software would normally detect. Tweaking the software to work with these difficulties is often a very complicated process if it’s possible at all, and it might render the software incapable of recognizing normal speech.

Dialect, accents, and other intangible aspects of speech

While it may not have as much bearing on how a particular language is expressed in writing, locality does greatly affect the way we speak any given language. Differences in pronunciation and enunciation between two people within the same locality are often difficult, if not impossible, to account for, so a person speaking in a different dialect may as well be speaking a different language altogether. Creating software or training an AI agent to understand multiple dialects of the same language is harder than you might think. On some level, the software must determine which particular dialect is being spoken during the feature extraction process. The difficulty of this task is compounded when you have multiple speakers, especially speakers from diverse cultural backgrounds.

The need for edited transcriptions

Edited transcriptions are one possible solution to some of the problems relating to each of the previous aspects of translation. Instead of the verbatim transcription that software generates being the final product, a service provider will often offer some “post-processing” work, in the form of a human being going over the verbatim transcript and fixing minor errors, removing redundancies and filler, and generally improving its readability (by replacing incorrect homophones, for example). Since this involves essentially hiring a person to proofread a computer-generated translation, it eliminates the “automated” aspect of the process. Instead of using human effort to counter the weaknesses of a computer system (and still arrive at a final product that doesn’t meet the same standards as a professional transcription), why not replace the software application with human effort entirely? This is not to say that software-generated recordings don’t have their own audience. For some purposes, such as voicemail recordings and general surveillance, automated speech recognition makes perfect sense. In these cases, minor transcription errors can be overlooked in light of the cost-saving that ASR offers. This is also ASR’s greatest saving grace for applications where the volume of incoming data is far too high for a human transcription to be viable. In cases where high volumes and time-sensitivity factors are considered, edited documents offer the greatest compromise between ASR (which wouldn’t be accurate enough on its own) and professional transcription (which wouldn’t be as cost-effective. For more sensitive applications, especially those in which the contents of a recording are of critical value or where the quality of recordings is inconsistent or cannot be guaranteed, a professionally transcribed document always manages to edge out a computer-generated one.

Hiring Professional Transcribers Vs. Speech Software

As research into natural language processing and speech recognition applications begin to bear greater fruit, we may eventually arrive at a focal point where computer-generated transcriptions are virtually indistinguishable from professionally transcribed ones. We’re definitely not there yet, though, and given the breadth of problems that computer scientists must tackle to achieve this, it’s safe to say we won’t be there any time soon. While software may achieve great results for extremely specialized applications, a general-use speech recognition software that can reliably get the job done, regardless of the scope of the task, simply doesn’t exist right now. That’s why we’d suggest that you always opt for professional transcription service over an automatically generated one, especially if you’re invested in maintaining the quality of your final product. Get in touch and let’s get your transcription project off the blocks right away. [post_title] => Why Hire Professional Transcribers Instead of Using Transcription Software [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => why-hire-professional-transcribers-instead-of-using-transcription-software [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-02 08:20:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-02 12:20:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2598 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2593 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-03 08:12:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-03 12:12:29 [post_content] => Eulogy speech writing Bereavement can be one of the most difficult aspects of life to cope with. Loved ones inevitably pass on, but writing a eulogy speech that does justice to the loss you feel is one of the hardest things you’ll ever have to do. If you (or someone you know) have lost someone recently, then you’ll know the feeling of disbelief that comes with such an event. That, and the whirlwind of emotions that goes along with it, is enough to deal with on its own. Yet with every passing, those left behind are entrusted with one fundamental task by the recently deceased: to live on. The first step towards a continued life is to put those who are gone to rest.

Eulogy Speeches – Reminding Ourselves that We Grieve Together

For the sake of formality, let us start by taking a look at the definition of a eulogy. A eulogy is a speech given during a funeral as a tribute to the recently deceased – one that recounts moments shared with them, as well as bits and pieces of what you’ll remember them most fondly for. It’s considered an honor to be asked to give a eulogy for someone you knew, as it tends to show just how great a part you played in their lives, and how great a part they played in yours. A eulogy can present itself as a very tricky task, especially given the breadth of what it aims to achieve, as well as the gravity of the situation. You’re not just saying good bye to someone who was a close companion in one way or another, you’re also addressing a gathering of people who are similarly bereaved and grieving with you. When you speak, you are speaking as the singular voice that ushers that lost loved one to the great beyond – your words forming the ending note in the final chapter of their lives. You speak on the behalf of everyone who grieves with you, and sometimes on the behalf of the deceased themselves. The aim is to say good bye in a way that respects the time you spent together, and steels everyone in preparation for times to come. Naturally, this is quite the responsibility, and most of the time, the person taking it on is one of the people who are most affected by the loss. Most people will not give many eulogies over the course of their lives, which means advice (at least advice that is based on experience) will be hard to come by, and undoubtedly very difficult to ask for. Moreover, every person is different, meaning every eulogy is different, and different people will approach the task in very unique ways. There are some key considerations, however, that remain common throughout parting addresses, and knowing these can help you figure out how you want to word and deliver your own piece. To start off…

Tips for Writing a Touching Eulogy Speech

We mentioned this in passing earlier, but it deserves an explicit mention: There’s no such thing as a clinical approach to eulogy writing. You can seek inspiration wherever you might find it, but always remember that the person you’re writing about, and the assembly you’re speaking to, are both entirely unique to your situation. As such, adopting a formulaic approach to speech writing can take away from the essence of what a eulogy aims to achieve. You want your eulogy to be guided by a respect for your feelings, and the feelings of the people you’re addressing; and not by a desire to check the boxes for what makes a complete speech.

1.    Remember to Talk to Other People Who Were Close to the Deceased

This is also critical, and applies even more so when you’ve been asked to deliver the eulogy by someone who, in your mind, was closer to the deceased than even you. You should make sure that your address is not focused exclusively on moments you shared with the dearly departed, without giving room for other people in the assembly to connect to it. Remember, the purpose of a eulogy is twofold – you’re honoring a lost loved one and acknowledging their loss, while also attempting to make the process of bearing that loss easier on those around you. Make sure your own stories are interspersed with mentions of other people who are present, if not their stories as well. Being included in the process of informing your eulogy helps people feel less isolated in their grief, which in turn makes grieving a less difficult ordeal. Also, while you had your own unique connection to the deceased, so did many of those around you at the time you’re delivering your address; it’s important that you acknowledge those connections when you’re speaking to everyone.

2.    Decide on a Structure for Your Funeral Speech

There’re two basic approaches to how you can structure a eulogy, you can either follow a chronology, or a mood board.

Chronology-based eulogy

It will focus on outlining a timeline of events in the deceased’s life, from when and where they were born to the circumstances of their eventual passing. A life is a very long ordeal to sum up in just a few minutes though, so write down significant events you want to mention before you actually write your piece so that you don’t forget to mention something that shouldn’t have been omitted. Significant events can be anything including a marriage or a fateful encounter with a significant other, the birth of a child, service in the military, etc. Once you’ve written your speech around these events, you can include a brief paragraph that summarizes the different ways in which the deceased managed to enrich the lives of those around them.

Mood boards

These are slightly different. Instead of focusing on a series of events in chronological order, you group anecdotes or significant encounters into different segments depending on how they’d make the audience feel. The passing of a loved one is a decidedly somber and sorrowful occasion, but that doesn’t mean the tone of your eulogy has to be exclusively depressing throughout. For example, you could start with a note about the many hardships the person in question faced throughout their lives (sorrowful), and transition to how they managed to surmount all of those hardships (uplifting), and end on a comment about how the departed taught us to strive to achieve great things even in the face of overwhelming opposition (hopeful). If a particular negative section goes on a little too long, you could include a light-hearted anecdote or comment, especially if it is one that’s easy to associate with the memory of the deceased. Structuring your eulogy this way helps you find ways to incorporate elements of relief (such as humor) while still keeping the overall tone respectful, though it does require you to leverage your writing and speaking skills a bit more than a chronology. Speaking of which…

What Do You Say in a Eulogy - Pick Your Words Carefully

Keep in mind that the speech you’re writing is meant to be delivered at a funeral. Most of the time, that means no overly verbose phrases or flowery language, but you’ll know your own situation best. Keeping things as simple and colloquial as possible is usually a good thing; you want to think of the eulogy as a sort of monologue in a conversation between you and the assembly. However, it’s important to avoid getting too casual with your speech as well, at the risk of sounding crass or inconsiderate. Remember that there are others in the audience who’re facing this with you, and don’t say anything that might potentially offend someone’s sensibilities or cause them pain. This applies especially to the inclusion of humorous anecdotes; while these can provide some much-needed levity, they’re also just as likely to rub people the wrong way when executed poorly or inappropriately. Another aspect to “picking your words” is including bits and pieces of common and repeated phrases that people might’ve heard from the deceased. These can help lend emotional gravity to your writing, and make it easier for the assembly to connect to what you’re saying.

Make Sure Your Address Is Appropriate for your Station

A husband or wife delivering a eulogy in honor of their partner, or a child mourning a parent, can speak about just about any subject matter so long as they phrase it appropriately. However, these people may not always feel up to the task of delivering a speech, and may ask someone to step in for them. In cases like these, it is important to respect the difference in standing between the person delivering the speech and the person who asked them to deliver it. The same way, if you’ve been tasked with delivering a eulogy for a friend while their family are in attendance, it’s important that you don’t overstep and say things that upset the family.

Maintain a Positive Disposition (or as much of one as you can)

Once again, the passing of a loved one is a decidedly undesirable event. There’s no two ways to put it, and no way to spin it into a silver lining, that’s just how grief works. Always keep in mind that your eulogy’s main purpose is to help soothe the pain that the most important members of the assembly are feeling. This is why you should be extra mindful of these people and what they need to hear from you, both when you’re writing the eulogy and delivering it. With speech writing, it’s a matter of picking the exact right words and putting them in exactly the right place, while when speaking, it’s a matter of how you deliver those words. Especially when you’re covering subject matter that’s on the heavier side of things, you should be aware of the people around you and how your words are making them feel. Taking a moment to pause to collect yourself, or to give someone a kind look and a nod of reassurance, can go a long way towards helping them remain strong. Beyond this, it’s important to balance out the heavier, longer parts of your speech by having briefer, lighter anecdotes in between them. This helps make the speech less emotionally draining as a whole, both for you as a speaker, and everyone present in the assembly.

Don’t Feel Pressured

This applies especially to people who aren’t used to giving addresses, especially during difficult times. You might find yourself getting crushed under the weight of the immense responsibility that’s been placed on you. Nobody’s a “pro” at delivering eulogies, and even if experience were abundant (which it isn’t), no amount of practice can help prepare a person for events when they lose someone important to them.So if you find yourself getting emotional while writing your speech, or you feel like you can’t do justice to the task, be sure to remind yourself that you’re grieving too, and that nothing takes precedent over that. Focus on your emotions regarding the deceased, and try to use those emotions as the basis for your speech rather than adherence to a guide. Don’t try to seek out the perfect words, that’s not what a eulogy is for, and it could take you more time to find these words than you have on hand.

Eulogy Speech Writing Services Can Help Put Your Emotions into Words

We understand that grief is a slow, arduous process, and one that can’t be rushed. If you’re having a rough go at things in the wake of someone’s passing, we can help you find the right words, or at least a worthwhile substitute.

If you’d like to know more about our speech writing services, please give us a call at 1-877-897-1725 or start chatting with our representative today.

[post_title] => Writing a Touching Eulogy Speech for the Perfect Good Bye [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-a-touching-eulogy-speech-for-the-perfect-good-bye [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-08 07:07:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-08 11:07:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2593 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 10 [current_post] => 1 [in_the_loop] => 1 [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2646 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-25 09:41:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-25 13:41:52 [post_content] => Rules for writing great articles Writing great articles is not a skill you can learn overnight. It may not be something you are born with, but it is definitely something you can master by putting in the hard work. It takes writers years to hone their craft, and even then, they cannot achieve perfection. In fact, it won't be wrong to say there is no such thing as perfect writing. Everyone has a unique way of expressing their thoughts and beliefs. What matters is how their words resonate with others. A good article can educate people about a new idea, whereas a great article can change minds and encourage people to take action. Whether it is something as simple as clicking on a link and making a purchase or something as complex as adopting a new lifestyle, powerful writing carries a lot of weight and is worthy of respect. If you are looking to improve your article writing skills, learning these rules can be a valuable addition to your arsenal.

Rule 1: Know Your Target Audience

Before you put pen to paper – figuratively, of course – you should ask yourself who you're writing for. Now, most people will say they write for themselves. This is often the correct answer because we're our own biggest critics. Nevertheless, whether you are writing an article for affiliate marketing or working on a magazine article, the first thing you need to do is determine your audience. If you write for a pharmaceutical company or a law firm, you must already have a clear idea of who will be reading your copy. However, if you are an employee at a content marketing firm or work as a freelancer, you may have to do a little research to create a reader profile. It will help you understand their interests and motivation to click on your post. You can start by asking yourself the following questions:
  • Who will read this article?
  • Why would they read this article?
  • What will this article do for them?
Once you have found the answer to these queries, you can get a step closer to writing great articles. Try and learn about the factors that may excite your readers and the things that may not sit well with them. Doing so will help you figure out how you can get your audience to see your point of view or buy what you're selling. However, if you want to grow as a writer, don't limit yourself to an ideal audience. Think about other people who may find your article exciting or may connect with it on an emotional level.

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Rule 2: Research, Research, Research

It is always a good idea to write on topics you are passionate about. Be it your love for abstract art or your interest in marine biology, try writing about things that bring you joy. Alternatively, if you have a strong but unfavorable opinion about something, your personal feelings will undoubtedly add some substance to your writing – as long as you don't make your post sound too biased. However, no matter how much you know about a particular idea, make sure to conduct in-depth research before creating an outline for your piece. Read as much as you can. Learn about the history and background of the topic and how others around the world may have perceived it. Many writers allot a specific time frame for their research. In theory, it may work. But depending on what you're writing and who you're writing for, it may not be a good idea to limit your research process to a few minutes. In addition, don't cut any corners. Poor research is among the leading reasons most articles fall flat. On the other hand, good research helps us build our knowledge and facilitates learning. It also makes us more confident in our writing while nourishing our minds. Your research can make or break the article. If you want your words to make an impact, back up your arguments with facts and figures.

Rule 3: Grab the Reader's Interest

Once a person clicks on your article, you merely have seconds to make an impression. Since your title is the first thing a reader sees after opening your post, you must take extra care to make it compelling and interesting. Ideally, your main heading should convey what your article is about without divulging too much. Sound confusing? Well, your title should be an accurate representation of what the reader will find in the content body. However, it should also create an aura of mystique without being misleading. The next thing you should write a short and concise introductory paragraph to draw in your readers. A large chunk of text right at the beginning of an article may distract the reader. Worst case scenario, it may even stop them from reading any further. Therefore, it is pertinent to keep your opening short and attention-grabbing. It doesn't have to be something extraordinary. But it should at least capture the interest of your audience and encourage them to read what you have to say. Consider keeping your intro limited to two or three short sentences. It can even be a one-liner, depending on how well you can craft it. If your words are easy to scan and provide value, there is a good chance your reader will also make an effort to explore the article. Tips for writing articles

Rule 4: Make Your Article Visually Appealing

One of the most significant rules of writing great articles is making them visually appealing. You can create an element of interest by adding stunning photos and informative videos to your content. Moreover, try to incorporate well-explained charts and intriguing infographics wherever you can in your post. Also, if you come across a graphic that is relevant to your article but seems complex, consider taking some time to explain it to your audience patiently. You can also create customized images to make your piece look more professional. It will also help break up the bulky wall of text. Most brands invest extensively to procure graphic designers to develop valuable marketing content. Another way to make your article more attractive is by writing shorter paragraphs. Negative space in between the short paragraphs can help break the visual clutter. It allows your audience to read and digest each point before moving on to the next one. Here are some more ways you can make your pieces more reader-friendly.
  • Cascading subheadings
  • Bold and italicized words
  • Hyperlinks
  • Bullet points
  • Embeds
These factors will breathe a new life into your articles and motivate your readers to spend more time on them. Also, once you are done with writing articles, don't forget to edit and proofread them. Our years of experience in this field have made us pros at writing content for your site. For more information, please feel free to give us a call.

Rule 5: Add Substance to Your Articles

How many times have you found an article on your newsfeed that had a fantastic title but didn't have any substance? Unfortunately, it happens a lot. These click-bait articles are usually packaged as something worthwhile. However, they rarely tell you anything new or valuable. Although these posts manage to fulfil their target by getting more clicks, they leave the readers frustrated and unsatisfied – which is the exact opposite of what you should aim for. After all, one of the most important rulesforwriting great articles is never to leave the reader dissatisfied or craving more. If you want to improve your article writing skills, aim to add value to your words. It should provide new information or a fresh perspective by viewing the topic from a unique angle. Instead of barely scratching the surface, take a deep dive into the subject and look for ideas that require a detailed and nuanced discussion. Your content should solve problems and present solutions. It should connect with people on a deeper level and stimulate their imagination. Creating value-added content will encourage your readers to visit your piece over and over again. Meanwhile, a shallow article may stop them from ever making that effort again. Moreover, if you have a strong opinion, don't be afraid to share it with the world. However, please keep yourself open to criticism and be gracious with the feedback you receive. After all, your readers have a right to agree or disagree with your words.

Rule 6: Don't Water Down Your Words

Want to write with conviction? Don't let your fears hold you back. More often than not, the fear of judgment and criticism refrain writers from reaching their full potential. It is easy to develop a mindset where you don't want to displease your editor or write something that your audience may not fully agree with. As a result, you start using soft language and adopt a pacifying tone. In some instances, it might work in your favor. However, in most cases, it makes your writing look watered down and ineffective. Your message may even get lost in translation if you spend too much energy on creating a perfect post that keeps everyone happy. Therefore, the next time you write an article and have the nagging fear of "what if they don't like it," please immediately push aside those negative thoughts. While it is essential to make sure your words don't spread misinformation, you must not let the fear of disagreement hold you captive. If you believe in a specific cause or an idea, write about it without entertaining any second thoughts. You can't please everyone. It would help if you accepted that there would be times when your message will not resonate with the readers, and that's completely fine. Receiving a negative comment or a harsh criticism may put you in a bad mood for a few hours. But don't let it stop you from writing articles that can add value.

Summing Up the Rules for Writing Great Articles

Writers never stop learning and growing. Hence there is no set formula that will enable you to produce brilliant content. Nevertheless, a few important rules of writing articles can set you on a path to success and help you create content that will stand the test of time. The rules include learning about your target audience, conducting in-depth research, and reeling in the reader with your compelling headline. Moreover, your article must have bullet points, images, graphics, and other visual elements to increase reader engagement. You can also add substance to your articles by asking the right questions and providing the readers with the correct answers. In addition, make sure you write with conviction and never water down your words due to fear of criticism. If you are interested in our article writing service, please drop us an email today. Our talented writers are experienced in all niches and can help you grow your business and reach a larger market segment. [post_title] => 6 Rules for Writing Great Articles [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 6-rules-for-writing-great-articles [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 10:16:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 14:16:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2646 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 135 [max_num_pages] => 14 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => 1 [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => 1 [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => afb69197a93a4f2cdd3e4767a2345262 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
Rules for Writing Great Articles - Feature

6 Rules for Writing Great Articles

Writing great articles is not a skill you can learn overnight. It may not be…

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                    [post_content] => Content writing topics

Are you at a loss for content writing topics for your blog? There are plenty of evergreen topics that suit just about any blog. Read on to find out.

1. Advice and Opinion Pieces

Life advice can be a great way to drive readership up, especially if you've cultivated a following based on opinion pieces. Posts like these give you a chance to form an intimate connection with your readers by providing solutions to their problems. You could talk about anything that relates to your niche. The best thing about advice is that it doesn't require much substantiation, so instead of backing everything up with data, you just have to sit down and think with an open mind. The second best thing, meanwhile, is that advice like this doesn't get old, especially if you’re coming from a place of authority. While things of a time-sensitive nature, such as tech reviews and current events, get dated quickly, the way life works changes very slowly in comparison. So while a two-year-old review of a phone won't be relevant at all anymore, life advice from six years ago will be worth just as much to one of your newer readers.

2. Anecdotal Topics, Drawing from Personal Experience

Similarly to the previous entry, this one relies on the social capital that people associate with your brand name. They'll want to know what you've been doing with your life and the things that have helped shape you into who you are now. Writing about anecdotes from your life allows you to turn journal entries into blog posts. You don't have to read anything, you don't have to premeditate too much either. You just think of an event and let the words go flow. As with life advice, posts like these allow you to develop your writing style, adding and subtracting traits that will eventually help your readers truly identify with that style and brand voice. Since you're also talking about your own experiences here, you're also getting the chance to strike a chord with your audience in a way that few other things can. Giving people a window into yourself helps them connect to your writing, perhaps even relate to it, which is a great way to ensure that they keep coming back to your site for more. Again, because this event is specific to you, the written content will be too, and you don't have to worry about putting your own spin on things or trying to distinguish yourself from everyone else out there. It just comes with the territory by default. Your content writing efforts won't ever get dated because it's an event from your life, and your take on it. As long as you're smart about how you leverage your opinion for your specific audience, people will always be able to find worth in the post, even if the event itself becomes obscure overtime. If you've got the perfect anecdote, but you just can't find the right words to do justice to it, consider tagging us in. Our blog writers have helped many prominent bloggers structure their content to deliver the best possible experience to their readers while also staying true to the essence of the event

3. Focus on Local Events and Attractions

writing about local events If your business has a local element to it, whereby you’re providing services within a geographical area, covering local events or places is a great way to engage potential customers. Every big city's got its own highlights, and you can take a visit to any easily identifiable hotspot and write about it to let your audience know what it's like and what you thought of it. Bonus points if the attraction you're discussing is unique to your locality. If you don't live in a big city and there's not much going on around your town, you can instead foucs on an event and subsequently pivot to a conversation about what’s happening where you are. If you're an avid traveler, blogging about the destinations, your visit, and the attractions within those destinations can be a great source of fresh content - especially if you can adequately capture the essence of that experience and explain it through your words. People are all about secondhand experiences – some might say a desire to live vicariously through others is what got blogging to really take off in the first place.

4. Write About Prevailing Social Issues

This is another type of opinion piece, but it deserves its own entry because it doesn't fall into any other categories. You can write about what you consider an "issue of our time", like climate change, problems relating to modernization and modernized societies, income and gender disparity, and many others. You can pick up any one of these issues and try to paint a clearer picture of them for your audience while also giving your own opinion as well. Tread the line carefully, though. Some topics can carry social importance, so adopting too radical a view may alienate some members of your audience. There's one of two ways to tackle such cases. Its best to adopt a more neutral standpoint that outlines mainstream arguments on either side, but you can also adopt a more candid approach. At the end of the day, it's all about the kind of persona you've built through your blog and how you wish to express yourself. Hot topics do draw big crowds, and your content writing will do well to tap into this.

5. Discuss the Journey of Learning a Particular Skill

blog writing about learning craftsmanship Some businesses, particularly those that have to do with craftsmanship, can use their blog posts to discuss the journey one of their talented professionals took in the pursuit of their craft. If you're a digital agency, you could have a piece written about one of your most senior graphic designers. If you're an independent blogger, you could write about a skill you'd learnt personally. Talk about what motivated you to start, how you developed that interest, and how much you've learnt up till now. Insightful, informative topics covered in a manner that serves to educate your audience are the perfect way for a blog to put out content that helps enrich an audience member's life. That's attention captured, and a reader who'll be returning to your blog to check up on updates in the future. Granted, the journey of learning the skill, or the expertise that goes into providing a particular skill, may become outdated overtime. If it does, you can discussthe evolution of your own craft and the differences between then and now.

6. Write a Fictional Anecdote

Generally, a blog is not fictitious. If anything, a blog is as far removed from fiction as it could be, since blogs deal with aspects of day-to-day life, experience-based accounts from real people. However, a great way to illustrate some abstract point, or demonstrate perspective, is to use a fictional event as the vehicle for it. A narrative is a great way to get readers hooked, and a fictional one is all the better. Rather than typing out your views, why not spin a story between two invented characters that sheds light on the merits of those views. This type of piece might suit some blogs better than others. Depending on how much you enjoy fiction, you could even make a fictional anecdote a regular part of your weekly or monthly offering. Even commercial websites could have a weekly section where the company mascot discusses the latest additions to their product catalogue.

7. Revisit Past Posts That Were Popular

Value added content When you've constantly been churning out content, you've likely revisited the same subject multiple times. Even if yours is a general-purpose blog that, for example, regularly comes up with lists of popular products in different eCommerce marketplaces. Any blog will have callbacks to content that was published earlier. By discussing pieces that received a lot of attention when they were first published, you let newer members of your audience know what they had to offer. In doing so, you're also allowing yourself to hook them with any one of your most popular titles. This strategy lets you capitalize on things that have already worked for you, is what we're saying. But it's about more than just that. If you're talking about technical content, a review of a past article could very well span an article in itself. You could discuss developments since the previous piece was written and address the technical shortcomings of the previous content. In doing so, you show your audience just how dedicated you are to your particular domain and also the depth of your knowledge within that domain. Based on our years of experience writing listicles for various blogs in various domains, we can tell you that a list of the best articles from the past year can be a great way to wrap up a year of great content, and it might just end up being your most popular piece to start off the next. If you'd like, we could even write it for you.

8. Share Your Opinion On Another Person's Opinion (or a Fresh Development).

Pieces like these are great for both establishing the personality of your brand as well as capitalizing on what's already been put out there. Don't forget to take advantage of what we call the trickle-down effect of popular content. If any popular content creator, policymaker, or celebrity comes out with an opinion that gets people talking, you can discuss those opinions for some pretty relevant press. Speaking of relevance, it plays a key role in driving the popularity of such a post. You've got to have a finger on the pulseof current affairs to benefit from pieces like these the most since they tend to have a very short period between having nothing out there regarding the event and being completely saturated with very similar content. For someone running a blog on politics, this can mean competing with other prominent politics and news blogs to be the first on the scene. If you feel up to it, you can even use articles like these to respond to the opinions discussed in the media you're covering. You let your audience know your take on a particular topic, ensuring that everything you're releasing yourself is wholly original. The best part is that in today's day and age, there's a lot of newsworthy developments constantly occurring, so you're not strapped for source material in the slightest. Of course, when you're covering something that's very recent, you can't really predict how much public interest a story will attract. Try to look for big names or popular people. If you're writing a finance blog,you can definitely do a piece on Apple CEO Tim Cook's new salary package and discuss developments in the company (and improvements in profit) since he took the helm.

To Conclude

That was our list of 8 timeless content writing topics. If you'd like to know more about value-added content, find out here. If you'd like to know more about our services and how we can help you revamp your content portfolio, click here to send in an inquiry.

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[post_title] => 8 Timeless Content Writing Topics for Your Blog [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-timeless-content-writing-topics-for-your-blog [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 11:06:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 15:06:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2656 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2646 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-25 09:41:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-25 13:41:52 [post_content] => Rules for writing great articles Writing great articles is not a skill you can learn overnight. It may not be something you are born with, but it is definitely something you can master by putting in the hard work. It takes writers years to hone their craft, and even then, they cannot achieve perfection. In fact, it won't be wrong to say there is no such thing as perfect writing. Everyone has a unique way of expressing their thoughts and beliefs. What matters is how their words resonate with others. A good article can educate people about a new idea, whereas a great article can change minds and encourage people to take action. Whether it is something as simple as clicking on a link and making a purchase or something as complex as adopting a new lifestyle, powerful writing carries a lot of weight and is worthy of respect. If you are looking to improve your article writing skills, learning these rules can be a valuable addition to your arsenal.

Rule 1: Know Your Target Audience

Before you put pen to paper – figuratively, of course – you should ask yourself who you're writing for. Now, most people will say they write for themselves. This is often the correct answer because we're our own biggest critics. Nevertheless, whether you are writing an article for affiliate marketing or working on a magazine article, the first thing you need to do is determine your audience. If you write for a pharmaceutical company or a law firm, you must already have a clear idea of who will be reading your copy. However, if you are an employee at a content marketing firm or work as a freelancer, you may have to do a little research to create a reader profile. It will help you understand their interests and motivation to click on your post. You can start by asking yourself the following questions:
  • Who will read this article?
  • Why would they read this article?
  • What will this article do for them?
Once you have found the answer to these queries, you can get a step closer to writing great articles. Try and learn about the factors that may excite your readers and the things that may not sit well with them. Doing so will help you figure out how you can get your audience to see your point of view or buy what you're selling. However, if you want to grow as a writer, don't limit yourself to an ideal audience. Think about other people who may find your article exciting or may connect with it on an emotional level.

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Rule 2: Research, Research, Research

It is always a good idea to write on topics you are passionate about. Be it your love for abstract art or your interest in marine biology, try writing about things that bring you joy. Alternatively, if you have a strong but unfavorable opinion about something, your personal feelings will undoubtedly add some substance to your writing – as long as you don't make your post sound too biased. However, no matter how much you know about a particular idea, make sure to conduct in-depth research before creating an outline for your piece. Read as much as you can. Learn about the history and background of the topic and how others around the world may have perceived it. Many writers allot a specific time frame for their research. In theory, it may work. But depending on what you're writing and who you're writing for, it may not be a good idea to limit your research process to a few minutes. In addition, don't cut any corners. Poor research is among the leading reasons most articles fall flat. On the other hand, good research helps us build our knowledge and facilitates learning. It also makes us more confident in our writing while nourishing our minds. Your research can make or break the article. If you want your words to make an impact, back up your arguments with facts and figures.

Rule 3: Grab the Reader's Interest

Once a person clicks on your article, you merely have seconds to make an impression. Since your title is the first thing a reader sees after opening your post, you must take extra care to make it compelling and interesting. Ideally, your main heading should convey what your article is about without divulging too much. Sound confusing? Well, your title should be an accurate representation of what the reader will find in the content body. However, it should also create an aura of mystique without being misleading. The next thing you should write a short and concise introductory paragraph to draw in your readers. A large chunk of text right at the beginning of an article may distract the reader. Worst case scenario, it may even stop them from reading any further. Therefore, it is pertinent to keep your opening short and attention-grabbing. It doesn't have to be something extraordinary. But it should at least capture the interest of your audience and encourage them to read what you have to say. Consider keeping your intro limited to two or three short sentences. It can even be a one-liner, depending on how well you can craft it. If your words are easy to scan and provide value, there is a good chance your reader will also make an effort to explore the article. Tips for writing articles

Rule 4: Make Your Article Visually Appealing

One of the most significant rules of writing great articles is making them visually appealing. You can create an element of interest by adding stunning photos and informative videos to your content. Moreover, try to incorporate well-explained charts and intriguing infographics wherever you can in your post. Also, if you come across a graphic that is relevant to your article but seems complex, consider taking some time to explain it to your audience patiently. You can also create customized images to make your piece look more professional. It will also help break up the bulky wall of text. Most brands invest extensively to procure graphic designers to develop valuable marketing content. Another way to make your article more attractive is by writing shorter paragraphs. Negative space in between the short paragraphs can help break the visual clutter. It allows your audience to read and digest each point before moving on to the next one. Here are some more ways you can make your pieces more reader-friendly.
  • Cascading subheadings
  • Bold and italicized words
  • Hyperlinks
  • Bullet points
  • Embeds
These factors will breathe a new life into your articles and motivate your readers to spend more time on them. Also, once you are done with writing articles, don't forget to edit and proofread them. Our years of experience in this field have made us pros at writing content for your site. For more information, please feel free to give us a call.

Rule 5: Add Substance to Your Articles

How many times have you found an article on your newsfeed that had a fantastic title but didn't have any substance? Unfortunately, it happens a lot. These click-bait articles are usually packaged as something worthwhile. However, they rarely tell you anything new or valuable. Although these posts manage to fulfil their target by getting more clicks, they leave the readers frustrated and unsatisfied – which is the exact opposite of what you should aim for. After all, one of the most important rulesforwriting great articles is never to leave the reader dissatisfied or craving more. If you want to improve your article writing skills, aim to add value to your words. It should provide new information or a fresh perspective by viewing the topic from a unique angle. Instead of barely scratching the surface, take a deep dive into the subject and look for ideas that require a detailed and nuanced discussion. Your content should solve problems and present solutions. It should connect with people on a deeper level and stimulate their imagination. Creating value-added content will encourage your readers to visit your piece over and over again. Meanwhile, a shallow article may stop them from ever making that effort again. Moreover, if you have a strong opinion, don't be afraid to share it with the world. However, please keep yourself open to criticism and be gracious with the feedback you receive. After all, your readers have a right to agree or disagree with your words.

Rule 6: Don't Water Down Your Words

Want to write with conviction? Don't let your fears hold you back. More often than not, the fear of judgment and criticism refrain writers from reaching their full potential. It is easy to develop a mindset where you don't want to displease your editor or write something that your audience may not fully agree with. As a result, you start using soft language and adopt a pacifying tone. In some instances, it might work in your favor. However, in most cases, it makes your writing look watered down and ineffective. Your message may even get lost in translation if you spend too much energy on creating a perfect post that keeps everyone happy. Therefore, the next time you write an article and have the nagging fear of "what if they don't like it," please immediately push aside those negative thoughts. While it is essential to make sure your words don't spread misinformation, you must not let the fear of disagreement hold you captive. If you believe in a specific cause or an idea, write about it without entertaining any second thoughts. You can't please everyone. It would help if you accepted that there would be times when your message will not resonate with the readers, and that's completely fine. Receiving a negative comment or a harsh criticism may put you in a bad mood for a few hours. But don't let it stop you from writing articles that can add value.

Summing Up the Rules for Writing Great Articles

Writers never stop learning and growing. Hence there is no set formula that will enable you to produce brilliant content. Nevertheless, a few important rules of writing articles can set you on a path to success and help you create content that will stand the test of time. The rules include learning about your target audience, conducting in-depth research, and reeling in the reader with your compelling headline. Moreover, your article must have bullet points, images, graphics, and other visual elements to increase reader engagement. You can also add substance to your articles by asking the right questions and providing the readers with the correct answers. In addition, make sure you write with conviction and never water down your words due to fear of criticism. If you are interested in our article writing service, please drop us an email today. Our talented writers are experienced in all niches and can help you grow your business and reach a larger market segment. [post_title] => 6 Rules for Writing Great Articles [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 6-rules-for-writing-great-articles [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 10:16:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 14:16:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2646 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2643 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-19 08:57:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-19 12:57:30 [post_content] => White Paper writing What is a white paper, and why has this inbound marketing channel become such a key part of online marketing strategies for businesses. Well for one, it is a deep-dive form of content that makes use of reliable resources and case studies with the purpose to educate readers regarding a particular topic. Such content pieces are great for businesses to present themselves as leading experts in their fields and attract other experts and customers to their products or services. Writing and formatting a white paper is in many ways similar to writing an eBook, with the only difference being that whitepaper writing requires a lot more research and knowledge on the given subject. Whitepaper writing requires dedication and a commitment to producing content that is unparalleled. Doing this in one day is a Herculean task best left to experts. This is where our white paper writing service comes in. With a team of expert white paper writers with diverse expertise, you can rest assured; we’ll deliver well above expectations.

Writing a White Paper Quickly

White paper writing 2 The initial part is the hardest mainly because of a load of information at your disposal. Getting lost in this information is highly likely and presenting findings and data without following a narrative is even more so. Luckily, with our tips and tricks, you’ll find the going easier.

1. Topic Selection

When it comes to topic selection, writing on any industry-relevant subject is not a good idea. You need to understand what your audience will connect with the most and how your qualifications come into play. Additionally, it would also help if you chose a topic that was only briefly covered by others. You can also network with experts within your organization or use other crowdsourcing techniques to have a better command of the subject. If you want your paper to get featured on other websites or SERPs, you should focus on creating a unique paper and filling a gap within the content already available. One great way to select a topic is by starting an online poll. Polls will help you get an idea of what your readers are interested in while also getting them excited for an upcoming paper.

2. Target Audience

Your target audience will determine the kind of tone, voice, and research that will be required for the paper. For example, if the purpose of your paper is to attract B2B customers, then perhaps adding technical jargon will not be a problem. However, if your target audience is not well-versed in the subject, you may need to take a different approach. Additionally, you should also focus on relevant keywords and the platforms where the audience will read your content. Choosing specific platforms will also help later on when you’re outlining and formatting the paper.

3. Intro and Conclusion

Why should your readers get excited about reading the paper? The introduction should include a brief description of what the paper includes and why readers will benefit from it. Most readers decide whether they’ll read an entire paper after reading the introduction. So, make sure to grab their attention and tell them why they should continue reading. Address the value of information and the benefits of your paper early on. The conclusion will help readers make a final decision about the entire paper. This section is where you can market the company’s products or services and persuade the audience to take a specific action. Adding business details and a CTA is best left for the outro of the paper.

4. Useful Information

You might see a paper as a perfect opportunity to promote your business and its products or services. However, it'll be best not to forget that the whitepaper's main purpose is to provide useful information and increase your readers’ knowledge. Additionally, this is also your chance to present yourself as a trustworthy industry leader, and a salesy paper will not be sufficient to do that. Use reliable sources, data, and stats and provide expert opinions on them instead of mere advertisements.

5. Keep Building on First Draft

You should draft several copies of the paper down the line to ensure no useful information was left out. You can keep updating the white paper and improving on it even after the first draft is out. One great way to do this is to write several copies and take a fresh outlook each time. You can also have other experts or professionals within the organization give it a read to spot any errors in the document.

6. Grabbing the Readers’ Attention

The technicalities and formalities included in writing a paper can make the tone of it extremely dull. However, instead of focusing on numbers and statistics, you should try adding more value with a perfectly flowing conversation. Keeping your readers’ attention from beginning till the end in a detailed and thorough paper might be difficult. However, as long as you follow the above-mentioned tips, you’ll be able to write a compelling copy.

Formatting a Whitepaper

Formatting a whitepaper When you’re formatting a whitepaper, you should remember to include an easy-to-read and clear title page. The title page will include the subject of the paper, names of experts who have helped create the document, publication date, and author name[s]. You should also divide your paper into headings, subheadings, and sections. This will help you keep your paper organized and provide a better reading experience. Typically, H1 and H2 headings are used in a paper for headings and subheadings, respectively. It’s also pertinent to note that not all pages of your paper need to be text-heavy. You can present highlights, critical details, and takeaways in a separate section of the document. Using colours will also help readers to find important chunks of information. However, remember not to use red, as red is mostly associated with edits in a file. Easy one-pages can also be used for a summary of the text-heavy sections of your paper. Finally, you should also ensure that your paper feels and looks consistent throughout. Typography, colours, and visuals will play an important role in shaping the readers' experience, so it’s also important to give special attention to such elements. The following are some important sections of a typical white paper:
  • Title
  • Abstract
  • Problem statement
  • Background
  • Solution
  • Conclusion
  • References

White Paper Mistakes to Avoid

Whitepaper mistakes to avoid Since white paper includes a lot of research and analysis, it’s always important to keep in mind the mistakes you’re likely to make and should avoid. Keeping this list in front of you will help you focus on the proper direction for the paper while avoiding mistakes that can lead to a poor reading experience for your audience. Let’s take a look at some common paper writing mistakes you should avoid at all costs:
  • Not conducting adequate research.
  • Making it sound like a sales pitch.
  • Not following a narrative or a story.
  • Creating a bad design for the paper.
  • Not providing relevant examples or supporting your arguments.
  • Making last-minute changes.

Types of Whitepapers for Businesses

Contrary to popular belief, this type of content writing is not new. The term was first used in 1922, when the British Government published the Churchill White Paper of 1922. A white paper, if well-written- will give your company a competitive edge and present you with an opportunity to influence readers to pick a particular solution for an existing problem in your industry. White papers are a great way to steer the decision-making process of your current or potential customers in a way that’s beneficial to the business. There are several types of white papers companies can use. Let's take a look at the six most popular styles:

1. Educational

As the name suggests, this white paper is used to inform and educate readers regarding a specific topic in a particular industry. The core function of this content is to provide valuable information and answers to the questions that a company’s customers and prospective customers might have. The focus of this is to teach customers what they don’t already know and present a guide. You can use inbound marketing tactics and write how-to’s or give an in-depth analysis of a new industry or technology when writing an educational white paper.

2. Problem Solving

A problem-solving white paper requires persuasive writing techniques, credible sources, and a mature tone. You should think outside the box to present solutions to a problem your customers might have. Of course, the purpose of this type of white paper is to push out your products and services in a subtle manner. However, in doing that, you should focus on presenting unique ideas and steps to solve a particular problem. Think of the solutions that already exist and how you can cater to the same problems with a different approach. Problem-solving whitepapers are also great for sharing company values and beliefs.

3. Technical

A technical white paper provides technical details about an industry, products, services, or technology. You can offer details of your particular products and how to use them in this document. To strengthen the credibility of your technical white paper, you can also present some visuals and case studies. Typically, the purpose of this document is to attract technical buyers to your particular product or service. Your focus should be on your audience and making the copy error-free, concise, and easy to comprehend.

4. Market Research

A whitepaper based on market research includes an executive summary that highlights important data and provides a professional analysis of it. This document typically includes a lot of graphs and interesting analyses or arguments. Such white papers are excellent for PR, and they can either present trends, highlights, and findings or an argument based on the data presented. You can evaluate recent updates on a particular topic in your industry and present interpretations or predictions based on them.

5. Visionary

Typically used by technology-based companies, this type of white paper shows a reader why a particular business is trustworthy and best for long-term partnerships. This document gives innovative insights and provides arguments for why some products or services will never become outdated. You can also use this copy to showcase the visionary experts who work at your organization.

6. Knowledge Papers

Used for both ATL and BTL campaigns, these papers include a debate-style writing technique that puts you in a credible, authoritative, and visionary position. You can choose to address an existing industry debate or create a new one. However, the focus of this paper will be to make your readers listen, thus making persuasion a critical part of it.

Do You Need Help Creating a Whitepaper for Your Business?

We have several years of experience and a proven track record of customer satisfaction when it comes to creating compelling whitepaper copies for businesses. We provide 100% original content, accommodation for urgent requests, proofreading and editing services, unlimited revisions, 24-hour customer support, and ghost-written copies for all our clients. So, if you’re on the lookout for experts in business, technology, hybrid, or product comparison-related white paper writing services, contact us now by calling (877) 897-1725. [post_title] => Writing and Formatting a White Paper Fast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-and-formatting-a-white-paper-fast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 09:03:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 13:03:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2643 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2636 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-14 08:50:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-14 12:50:30 [post_content] => Title capitalization There are varying and often confusing rules to the use of the English language and none so much as title capitalization. With a language that's so pervasive and commonly used, you're bound to find different schools of thought that define the rules in their own way. When it comes to print media and even forms of online written content, the rules can get even more difficult to ascertain. Specifically, when you talk about writing an article, book or even a social media post – thes rules can get very detailed and all the more elusive. There is an abundance of different style guides out there, and even veteran writers can find themselves making mistakes every now and again. If you've found yourself stumped on your journey towards creating exceptional online content, this guide is for you.

Simple Rules for Title Capitalization

Before we can get into the exact nuances that matter with each style, let's look at the things that most styles have in common. To start off…

Always Capitalize the First and Last Words

Let's start with a fairly straightforward rule. Always capitalize the first and last word of your title, regardless of what those words are. For example: Incorrect: "tips to capitalizing titles" Correct: "Tips to Capitalizing Titles"

Always Capitalize oYur Nouns

While the jury might be out on other parts of speech, all of your mainstream style guides agree that nouns are of great importance in a title. A noun is defined as a word that identifies a class of objectsor a specific instance of that class, where the object in question can be any place, animal, or thing (real or abstract). Common nouns deal with class identifiers, while proper nouns deal with instances. Consider the following sentence: "Hello, my name is Jim." Now it's easy to tell that the word "Jim" carries importance here since it contributes heavily to the sentences communicated. So is the word "name", since it determines what the word "Jim" defines. In this case, "Jim" is an example of a proper noun, while "name" is a common noun, and when you're writing in prose or paragraphs, the rules state that you're only supposed to capitalize proper nouns, while common nouns are left in lower case unless they're starting off a sentence. Titles, however, are different. If there was a title in our sentence, the word "name" would also be capitalized, regardless of whichever style you're using. Pronouns are the same; you shouldn't write words like "I", "You", "We", or "Us" without capitalizing them. Common and proper nouns are both categories of principle words, as are pronouns, so you shouldn't usually leave them in the lowercase. So, in this case, our final statement becomes: "Hello, my Name is Jim" We're gradually getting closer to a statement that would function perfectly as a title, but we're not yet there. Next up…

Always Capitalize Your Verbs, Adverbs, and Adjectives

Words like "my" and "your" can be confusing since they function as different types of speech depending on how they're used. Technically speaking, they're attributive adjectives or adverbs denoting possession. This means that they commute the ownership attributed through a pronoun to a common noun or verb. If "I have a car", then that car, by definition, is "my car". The English language doesn't require you to capitalize your possession bearing adjectives and adverbs while writing sentences, but titles are different once again. All styles, including the APA (American Psychological Association), MLA (Modern Language Association), CMOS (Chicago Manual Of Style, at times, shortened to CMS), and AP (Associated Press) styles require you to capitalize all of your adverbs and adjectives, regardless of their position in a title. So going back to our initial statement, we had: "Hello, my Name is Jim" This now becomes: "Hello, My Name is Jim" Which is our finalized version of the title.

Always Leave Your Articles in Lower Case

Articles are words such as the, a, and an, which tell you whether you're referring to a general or specific object (i.e.the calculator refers to a specific calculator vs. a calculator, which is used to make general statements about calculators). As a rule of thumb, it's good to keep in mind that all articles are left in lower case unless they start or end your title.

The Tricky Part of Capitalizing Your title

Now that we've covered the broad strokes version of what to capitalize and what to leave in lower case let's look at parts of speech that have more intricacies involved.

Prepositions

The first area of contention, which most people tend to have trouble with, is prepositions. Prepositions are words that are usually used before pronouns and other nouns to define relations between objects. So when you say someone "arrived after dinner", or that "they were resting inside the room", the words after and inside are actually examples of prepositions. Other examples of prepositions include in, with, within, without, besides, among, around, above, below, across, against, and many more. Different schools of thought have differing opinions regarding what to capitalize and what to leave in regular case in a title when it comes to prepositions.

APA Citation

Regarding the APA citation style, you're only supposed to capitalize your longer prepositions (four letters or more) while leaving shorter ones in lower case. So when you're dealing with examples such as "A Walk Through the Meadow" you have to capitalize the word "Through", even though it's a preposition and it isn't situated at the beginning or end of your title. However, if you're using a shorter preposition, such as in the case of "A Walk in the Park", the preposition is written in lower case.

AP Stylebook

The Associated Press Stylebook is similar in that you only capitalize longer prepositions.

Chicago Manual of Style

The Chicago Manual of Style is slightly more difficult to deal with regarding what you should and shouldn't capitalize. The general rule is that you should never capitalize any prepositions or conjunctions unless:
  • They're used adverbially or adjectivally
  • They're used as conjunctions
  • They call for emphasis or are stressed upon
The first two rules are fairly direct and leave little room for the imagination. If you're saying"My Clothes are Soaked Through" or "Think It Through", you're using the word ‘through’ as an adverb, and it needs to be left capitalized. Similar is the case above when we talk about "A Walk Through the Meadow". The word through is being used as an adjective in this example, so it'll be capitalized once again. The third rule is a little more ambivalent, so you've got room to be creative in the third scenario. After all, what you choose to emphasize or draw the reader's attention to is entirely up to you as the writer, so you can justify capitalizing prepositions in some cases where they play a critical role in defining the meaning of your title.

MLA Style

The last major style we've got to look at is the Modern Language Association style, most commonly used in liberal arts or humanities texts. MLA advises you to leave all your prepositions in lower case, except when they're being used as subordinating conjunctions. We'll cover the specifics of these in the next section. For now, it's best to just keep in mind that MLA doesn't have a word length requirement when it comes to capitalizing prepositions within your title; if you're dealing with a preposition, leave it in lower case.

Conjunctions

There are two kinds of conjunctions in the English Language: subordinating conjunctions and coordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions are words that join two individual statements of equal relevance and importance. Think of words like "and" and "or"; when you say you'll "have either breakfast or lunch", or when you say that you "intend to visit the barbershop and the tailor", the order in which you use the noun terms is usually unimportant. This is because coordinating conjunctions join together two statements of the same grammatical relevance. One statement isn't a precursor or a prerequisite to the other. Subordinating conjunctions like "before", "after", and "until" are different. If you say"I ate before dusk", it's not the same thing as saying "It was dusk before I ate". In fact, both statements have mutually exclusive meanings. One says that you ate your meal before a certain time, while the other says that a certain amount of time had passed before you got to eat. Both cannot be true together. This is the key difference between subordinating and coordinating conjunctions. Subordinating conjunctions combine two statements where one statement is somehow dependent upon the other, either to show one as a necessary consequence of the other or the exact opposite. There's a lot of overlap between prepositions and subordinating conjunctions, and there're plenty of words (like all three of our examples up there) that function as both conjunctions and prepositions. When it comes to the Associated Press Stylebook or the APA Style guide, you're supposed to never capitalize your conjunctions, regardless of the type, unless they're more than four letters long. When it comes to CMOS and MLA, you can only capitalize subordinating conjunctions but never coordinating conjunctions.

Compound Words

Compound or hyphenated words require some handling if you insert them into your titles, but they're just a few rules you need to be aware of. They're the same for the Chicago, APA, and MLA style guides, so you don't have to worry about remembering different rules for each. To start off, if the compound word consists of two separate individual words that carry meaning, you'll capitalize both. An example of this is "self-report", which would be written as "Self-Report" if part of a title. Secondly, if you're dealing with a hyphenated word that consists of a prefix and another word, you'll capitalize just the prefix and leave the actual word in lower case. So the word "anti-inflammatory" would be written as "Anti-inflammatory". The same also applies to words with a single letter attached as a prefix (such as t-shirt, which would be written as T-shirt). Finally, if you're dealing with a compound word that contains prepositions, articles, or coordinating conjunctions, you'll leave the preposition, article, or coordinating conjunction in lower case while capitalizing the rest of the word as outlined above. So a word such as "holier-than-thou" would be written as "Holier-than-Thou" within a title.

The Final Word

Those are all the rules you need to know when deciding what should and shouldn't be capitalized in your title. Be sure to be mindful that the rules for sentence cases tend to be very different from title cases, and you'll be on your way to producing quality content. Of course, there's more to creating quality content, whether it be an article, book, or blog post, our team of content writers can help. [post_title] => Capitalizing Your Title: The Dos, Don'ts and Details [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => capitalizing-your-title-the-dos-donts-and-details [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 08:52:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 12:52:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2636 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2632 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content] => Tips for magazine article writing Do you wish to see your byline adorning the pages of your favorite publication? Do you want to build a reader base that awaits your next article with bated breath? Well, with a little bit of work, you can take your magazine article writing skills to the next level. The key to writing great magazine articles is to create content that engages from start to finish, and provides value to the reader. Regardless of which magazine you are aiming for, a few tips can help you master your craft and produce articles that any publication in the world would be proud to put out for you. However, before we delve into our tips on writing magazine articles, let's take a moment to understand how this particular form of writing differs from other online content writing.

Magazine Article Writing Vs. Other Forms of Writing

Writing an article for a magazine is not the same as writing one for a newspaper or an online directory. Moreover, the pieces you may see in a magazine are inherently different from the content you may find in journals and books as well. The tone and style of these articles vary with each publication, genre, and topic. However, two things set these pieces apart from other forms of writing – they allow more room for creativity and tend to be more visually appealing. While article writing and book writing also require creative input and critical thinking, drafting magazine articles allows you to play with different visual aspects. The use of colorful graphics and photographs to capture attention becomes a must. Furthermore, the length of magazine articles depends on the publication you’re writing for, what you're writing and who you're writing for. In most cases, writing content for the internet does not come with word count limitations. And insofar as books are concerned, you’re usually your own boss. But to give you an idea, an average magazine article can be anywhere between half a page to a dozen pages. Nonetheless, the word count for 12-page pieces is usually not as high as you'd think since they are interspersed with pictures and advertisements.

Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Connect

article writing Here are some tips on how to create magazine articles that will grab your readers' attention.

1. Write About Things You Are Interested In

You are more likely to create engaging content if you write about something you find intriguing or exciting. Your passion for a specific cause or topic will not only show in your work, but it will improve the quality of the output automatically. Articles written with passion are more likely to connect as they give readers a peek into your heart and soul. If you let your words reflect your love and devotion to the subject of your article, it will convince your readers to trust your judgment and authority. Magazine articles are an excellent medium for talented writers to showcase their skills while playing to their strengths. Moreover, publishers always prefer pieces that have an element of individuality. So, if you are particularly fond of something – be it music, traveling, cooking, or martial arts – make sure to use it as your calling card. However, just because you think you know a topic inside out doesn't mean you should cut corners while conducting research. It is essential to scour the internet and see what others are saying. Also, look for the latest stats and back up your claims with valuable insight.

2. Use Compelling Headings and Sub-Headings

Although this tip is not unique to magazine article writing, it requires a special mention. Your headline is the first thing a reader would see while browsing through the index of their favorite magazine or on the front page of their search engine. It is the focal point of your article, as it draws your readers' attention and encourages them to click on it. Many experts compare a well-crafted headline to a beautiful wrapping paper. However, in reality, it is a gift itself. An excellent headline, paired with equally compelling subheadings, will build the interest of your readers. Therefore, you should put in extra effort to create headlines that perfectly capture the essence of your article without giving everything away. Just make sure they are not misleading. It is also a good practice to include your main keyword in the main heading to make your post easy to discover. We'll discuss more on this later.

3. Reel In the Audience with a Unique Angle

One of the best ways to make your magazine article appealing is by ensuring it has a unique perspective. Start by creating a profile for your target audience and figure out where their interests lie. You can also look at the articles published by your competitors and industry giants. Doing so will help you determine which angles have been discussed before and which require more exploration. Instead of just scratching the surface, dig a little deeper and discover fresh viewpoints that establish you as an expert in the field. Even if you are writing on a mainstream topic, such as a new superhero movie that has recently hit the theatres, focus on the aspects that others have not bothered to explore. Remember, creating value-added content will keep your readers engaged and the publisher happy.

4. Keep It Short, Sweet, and To the Point

Brevity is the soul of any well-written content. If you want your magazine article to remain engaging from the first sentence to the last, you must make it easy to read and understand. It is generally good to use short and simple sentences. You should break your information into small chunks without leaving any room for ambiguity. Of course, depending on the nature of your article, you may have to use a few complex sentences. However, using too many complicated terms and long sentences can distract the readers. Moreover, make sure your readers can follow your train of thought without making much effort. Set the pace to match the article's tone, and don't let your message get lost between long sentences. If your audience finds your magazine article writing skills tedious or frustrating, there is a good chance they won't come back for more. Apart from using short and concise sentences, ensure your paragraphs don't exceed six lines. Adding bulleted lists to your content can also make it easy to skim and comprehend, attracting the readers.

5. Include Visual Elements

Break up huge chunks of text with striking pictures, powerful graphics, and well-explained charts. Including valuable visual elements in your magazine article is a foolproof way to increase audience engagement. They will give your audience a chance to rest their eyes without taking their attention away from the piece. With the right images, you can explain your idea or perspective without saying a lot. Additionally, photos and videos can make your content more memorable. They can help your readers interact with the piece, which may also increase their willingness to return to it. These are among the leading reasons why most publishers and brand owners invest extensively on graphic work to support their written content. How to write articles for magazines

6. Get Your Audience Involved and Invested

Starting your magazine article with a thought-provoking question or a shocking fact can help you grab the interest of your audience from the get-go. If your question is something that your readers can relate to personally, it will undoubtedly compel them to read further. However, to draw the attention of your readers, you must understand their desires and pain points. You should also know about your audience's gender, age, and location to choose your article's right style and tone. After all, the ideas that may intrigue women aged 30 to 45 are not likely to resonate with men aged 50 to 65. Furthermore, always address your readers directly. Writing in the second person will allow you to use words such as "you,” "your," and "yours." Your readers should feel as if you have written the article just for them. Once they build that connection, they'll stay hooked until the very last page. Also, make your piece sound like a discussion one would have with their friend. It shouldn't come across as a lesson or an essay. This magazine article writing tip will surely help your audience feel like a part of the narrative.

7. Don't State Facts, Tell a Story

Storytelling is an art. While anyone can share factual information, it takes expertise and a unique thought process to tell a story. As a writer, your biggest priority should be keeping your readers on their toes as they take in your words and build a world of their own. Whether you are writing about politics or deep-sea diving, your anecdotes and experiences can set your article apart from the rest. Sharing small stories also allows your audience to connect with you on an emotional level. It makes you and your words more relatable. People may not remember the statistics you've shared in your article. But they are most likely to remember the tidbits from your personal life that made their way onto the page. To create compelling content, take inspiration from your past experiences or create fictitious scenarios to leave your audience spellbound. You can also use analogies, quotes, and pop culture references to breathe a new life into your content.

8. Choose Your Keywords Wisely

Magazines are no longer limited to the print medium. You can now access almost every magazine online, with some charging a small subscription fee and others allowing you to read their content for free. Now, you may have heard that we should write for people and not the search engines. Our question is, why not write for both? Creating compelling and engaging content is just not enough. You also need to make your articles discoverable. Search engine optimization or SEO is the most effective way to make sure your audience finds your posts. You need tofind out what people are looking for and incorporate those keywords into your article. According to the SEO best practices, your main keyword should appear at the article's beginning, middle, and end. You can also include two to three additional keywords throughout the content. It will increase the chances of your article ranking higher on Google.

9. Wrap It Up Nicely

Don't let your closing statement go to waste. As you wrap up your article, utilize the last few lines to include a CTA call to action. It is essentially a way for you to tell your readers what to do next. Whether you are looking for feedback or want your audience to check out your latest video series, make sure to include a relevant link that directs them to your preferred webpage or service. The next step is to edit your content. You can use services such as Grammarly or Copyscape to ensure your article is free of mistakes and plagiarism. This is also your last opportunity to format the piece and ensure no negative spaces or weird indentations. Moreover, please use different font sizes for headings, subheadings, and body to increase readability and engagement. You can also use bold words and italicized sentences to make your critical ideas more prominent.

Magazine Article Writing Made Easy

To conclude, there are no set rules to writing a compelling magazine article. However, the tips mentioned above will enable you to break the mold by producing great content. A wisely chosen topic with a unique perspective and great headline can do wonders for your career. Similarly, short and clear sentences sprinkled with personal anecdotes can make your article more fun to read. If you feel a little lost in how to do go it alone, our article writing service could be the order of the day. Our team of experienced article writers ably supported by our team of expert designers can help you create magazine articles that hit the right note every time. [post_title] => 9 Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Hook Readers from Start to Finish [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 9-tips-for-writing-magazine-articles-that-hook-readers-from-start-to-finish [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2632 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2622 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-29 06:30:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-29 10:30:30 [post_content] => how to write product descriptions A compelling product description is crucial to the success of your eCommerce business. For those of you that don’t know, these are essential pieces of marketing copy that describes your product’s features and benefits to potential customers, persuading them to buy. Excellent product descriptions accurately capture the essence of a product to influence purchase decisions. In other words, they can well be the back bone of your online business’s success. Most entrepreneurs and marketers struggle with writing powerful product descriptions that can convert casual bowsers into life-long customers. They craft their copies around factual information and don't focus on the fact that they are selling an actual product to a real person. As a result, most product descriptions look like a block of information you are likely to find at the back of a product label. Below, we have put together some tried-and-tested tips on how to write a product description that converts.

1. Define Your Target Audience

Before you start writing a product description, you must understand the persona of your potential buyer. Defining your target audience can help you address them directly and engage them in a conversation. You can only create an impactful copy if you know who you're writing for and what would compel the reader to buy your product. It is also important to remember that the features that may entice one demographic might not be valuable to the other. Moreover, knowing your audiencecan help you select the right words and answer the right questions. It also enables you to find the perfect tone for the product.For example, you may want to inject humor into a product description for Christmas sweaters, but you can't use the same writing style to sell medical equipment or something more serious, such as coffins. Narrowing down the consumer characteristics can help you draft a copy that is equal parts informative and persuasive. If your product description addresses the pain points, values, interests, and frustrations of your buyers, there is a good chance they'd be willing to spend their hard-earned money on it.

2. Focus on Benefits over Features

Agreat product description must include all the information a buyer may need to make a purchase. It should tell the customer about the unique specifications of your product that set it apart from the rest and share any technical facts that may influence their decision. However, you must also understand that the features you are excited to write about might not necessarily interest your target audience. Some of them may even find it boring. The best way to retain customer attention and capture their interest is by explaining how the product will benefit them. Your copy should describe the advantages of a product and tell the buyer how it will reduce their pain points or enhance their quality of life. Before you start writing a product description, list down the top features of the item you are selling and then translate them into substantial benefits. Moreover, to prevent your copy from looking like an advertisement, refrain from using superfluous words. It would be best if you also avoided using superlatives that you can't justify. Following this tip will help you how to write a description that converts into a sale.

3. Elicit Emotions through Storytelling

A strong product description provides the buyers with all the relevant details and impacts them emotionally. According to a 2009 research study,holding a product in hand increases a person's desire to buy or own it. However, since they can't physically touch your product through their screens, your job is to paint a vivid picture that also packs an emotional punch. If you want your product descriptions to convert, make sure your content tells a story that your potential buyers can connect with. You can set the scene by telling them who created the product and what inspired them to do so. Taking the buyers on the journey of developing the product will allow them to relate to it. Depending on what you're selling, a personal anecdote or an entertaining fact about the product may also increase the buyer's interest. Nonetheless, you must make sure your words don't come across as dishonest or insincere. On the contrary, your story should enable customers to envision the product and how it would add value to their life.

4. Make It Sound like a Real Conversation

conversational product descriptions It may be tempting to sprinkle your product description with fancy words and literary references, but doing so can potentially turn away your customers. So, if you want the buyers to connect with your product emotionally and ultimately buy it, consider adopting a natural tone and using simple words. Ideally, a product description should sound like a conversation between friends. It should flow smoothly and have a life of its own. Instead of making sweeping statements, you should inform your buyers about the features and benefits just like you would share with a friend or a loved one. The customer should feel like you have their best interest at heart and that your words are not merely transactional. Product descriptions that use natural language and a friendly tone can help your eCommerce business  build a loyal customer base. Potential buyers are more likely to purchase if they find your copy to be honest and genuine. It would also help you stand out from the competition and make your products more memorable. If you need help writing product descriptions that sell, please feel free to give us a call.

5. Be Mindful of Power Words

Did you know there are certain words you can include in your product description to elicit a response from your target audience? More often than not, business owners and marketers end up using words such as "revolutionary" or "innovative"to describe a product when it is anything but that. Instead, sprinkle your copy with descriptive words and adjectives that may excite or intrigueyour prospective buyers. For example, if you are writing a product description for a dress, you can replace the terms "pretty" and "high-quality" with "sensational"and"luxurious." According to David Ogilvy, here are some of the most influential words that can turn a casual reader into a buyer.
  • Suddenly
  • Now
  • Announcing
  • Introducing
  • Amazing
  • Sensational
  • Revolutionary
  • Miracle
  • Magic
  • Quick
  • Hurry
Using these power words can take your product description to the next level.

6. Make Your Copy Easy to Scan

A great product description is easy to read and understand. Instead of explaining your product in lengthy and complex paragraphs, consider using simple sentences that get the message across. Customers have a notoriously short attention span when it comes to making online purchases. So, the best thing you can do to keep them interested in your product is to present them with a description that they can scan. For example, you can break down product specifications into bullet points to make them more reader-friendly. Moreover, different font sizes and lots of white space can help break the visual clutter. Your buyer shouldn't have to sift through long pieces of writing to find valuable information. Instead, you should present it to them on a figurative silver platter. Incorporating the product's name into the heading and using highlighted words can also impact the reader's attention span. If you’re struggling to create quality product descriptions at scale, our product description writing service might be what you need.

7. Optimize for Search Engines

Optimize your product descriptions for Google Search Including specific keywords in your product descriptions can help improve your search engine optimization (SEO). This will ultimately increase your chances of ranking high on the search results page. If you want to draft a conversion-oriented copy, make sure to do a little bit of keyword research to find out what the customers are searching for. Once you have found suitable keywords, integrate them and their variations into your content. The SEO best practices suggest placing keywords in the page titles, Meta descriptions, and image tags.  For good measure, include the main keyword at the top and bottom of your page to ensure your customers can easily find your product. It is also worth mentioning that your content should not be stuffed with keywords, as it may make your product description look unauthentic. The goal of optimizing your product description is to help gain new customers. Adding relevant keywords will allow prospective buyers to discover your brand and learn about its values with a few simple clicks on their device. Furthermore, adding relevant tags to product images also carries a lot of weight with search engines, which takes us to our next tip on how to write a product description that compels customers.

8. Always Use Quality Images

As the wise adage goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. If you want to master the art of writing excellent product descriptions, you cannot compromise on the quality of images. As mentioned above, customers cannot physically see or touch your product. While your words can help them envision how the product may look or feel, adding a good image along with your text can actually encourage them to buy it. It is one of the essential parts of a powerful product description. Most high-end brands hire professionals to create stunning photos and videos that capture all the best features of their products. However, spending precious resources on such services may not be feasible for new startups and small businesses. Instead of focusing too much on what your competitors are doing, divert your energy to take a few quality photos that enhance your product and effectively display its unique specifications. As long as your image is large, clear, and in line with the overall theme of your brand, there is a good chance that it will manage to convert readers into buyers. The accompanying copy should also create imagery that entices the customer into imagining what it would be like to hold or use the product.

What a short video regarding product description importance

Our Final Thoughts

Those were our best tips on how to write a product description that compels potential customers to make a purchase. If you are an entrepreneur or a small business owner looking to create brand awareness and improve your conversion rate, our team of content writers is ever-ready to help. To find out more about our services, contact us today. [post_title] => How to Write Compelling Product Descriptions that Convert [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-compelling-product-descriptions-that-convert [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:37:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:37:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2622 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2616 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content] => Bio Writing We’ve all had to be introspective at some point, especially when you’re looking to put yourself out there through a professional bio. You’ve likely thought about who you are or what qualities you embody. You’ve thought about your achievements.  Thinking to yourself is one thing, though, and writing it down for an external audience is entirely another. On the surface, it should be fairly simple. It’s a short paragraph or two describing your professional journey so far and where you intend to take it. But then why do so many people struggle to write a bio that adequately captures who they are? We’ve put together a checklist of the things that combine to make a great bio. To start off:

Start Strong

In many ways, the most important part of your blog is the opening section. A strong introduction not only reels your readers in, it can also serve to highlight the strongest aspects of your repertoire. Those first few lines need to be absolutely spot on to prompt the person reading to continue, so don’t skimp on your trial and error. Try out as many opening lines as you can think of if you feel like your current iteration could be better. Be confident, be honest, and don’t hesitate to strut your stuff. The opening lines are all about making an impact, and there’s a variety of ways to do this. You can open with humour, you can open with an achievement that speaks for itself, or you can open with a reference. There’s room to experiment, so there’s no excuse for trying as hard as you can to think of what fits your bio best.

Be Partial Towards Recent Developments, but Don’t Hesitate to Discuss How Got You Here

Like a resume, the more current your bio is, the better. Make sure you include a sentence or two that tells people, at least vaguely, about where you are now and what you’re doing. It lets prospective interests know what you’re doing these days and whether your skillset is relevant to them. While you might be tempted to list events in order of recency, don’t do that. Not every post is important, and not every move significant. Instead, if there’s a turning point in your professional development, such as a time when you switched fields three years ago, you’re better off addressing that. It’s not as if you’ve got room to be long-winded, but you should still discuss what prompted the switch, so long as you were positively motivated. You can sneak in a line or two about how your prior experience empowers you in your current line of work as well.

Decide on a Tone and Keep It Consistent

A bio is a concise description and one that sees many iterations as your career evolves and your professional development progresses. If you’re used to cutting out and adding in individual lines (and even if you’re not), it’s good to give the whole thing a read over to see if you’re consistent. While the right tone for you will depend entirely on what career you’re in and how you’re most comfortable expressing yourself, there are certain pointers. You shouldn’t be arrogant or overly informal; it’s much better to phrase your brags as subtly as possible and maintain a polite disposition. Achievements are more effective when mildly understated than they are when blown out of proportion, so make sure you maintain a humble tone. Humor isn’t necessarily off the cards, but you have to balance it out with serious statements. Also, your best bet is tongue-in-cheek humor rather than something that might risk offending someone; remember, this is a professional piece. Consistency also extends to whether or not you’re writing in first-person. Don’t go from I to they (first to third-person), or skip the pronoun altogether (implied the first person). This of course is easier said than done, and if it’s not for you – there is no shame in hiring professional bio writers instead.

Don’t Forget to Inject some Personality into Your Writing

personality in your bio One of the most typical mistakes when writing a bio is being too formulaic in your approach. You find something that really works, so you copy the same structure or type out the entire thing in as neutral a tone as possible. Nothing which worked for someone else needs to work just as well for you. Your Bio should be like your fingerprint, abstractly similar but entirely unique in itself. You have an entire lifetime of experiences at your disposal, so be sure to showcase as much of them as you can, as positively as you can. Your writing conveys not only your experiences but also aspects of your outlook and who you are. You shouldn’t shy away from including stuff about your innermost goals and motivations to the extent that you’re comfortable. While you shouldn’t be too flowery in your use of language, don’t be afraid to use more complicated terms where there is merit to them.

Always Double Check Guidelines

The platform or portal you’re submitting your bio to might have specific guidelines for what’s considered a valid submission. Always make sure that you check all the boxes and that you haven’t included anything that they’ve disallowed. This also means that you won’t be able to submit the same exact bio to every single prospect, but that should be standard practice as it is. Make sure you tailor your bio to the sort of opportunity you’re on the hunt for to give yourself the best possible chances.

Be Concise

Top the point writing We’ve already discussed how you shouldn’t pad your bio, but there’s more to a good bio than just keeping things simple. Your bio is meant to be a rich summary of your recent professional experiences, but you don’t need to mention every single thing you’ve already mentioned with your resume. This brings us to another point: you should try to keep repetition between your bio and your resume to a minimum. That’s not to say there should be no overlap at all, but rather, that your bio should only further explore the most important parts of your resume, the parts you want a potential employer to focus on. By emphasizing those tenures, you can draw attention to aspects of your development that may not have been adequately represented as just another bullet point in your CV or LinkedIn profile.

Don’t List Your Achievements

Recall what we said about trying to keep yourself sounding as down to earth as possible. If your bio reads like a list of things you’ve accomplished, you’re not doing it right. Instead of leading every statement with what you are or what you’ve achieved, try to pivot to what you have to offer someone you’d want to establish a professional relationship with. Instead of talking about your skills and how you’ve acquired them, talk about what those skills can accomplish for someone working with you. People want to see what value you bring to the table, so making your bio about what you have to give, rather than just what you have, is a great strategy to employ.

Add a Personal Touch

We’ve already discussed the importance of abandoning the formulaic approach, but a great bio goes further than that. A bio should demonstrate more than just professional experience; it’s a representation of who you are. As such, you can’t expect to paint a clear picture of yourself by talking about your career alone; you can and should include references to personal triumphs and milestones. We’re obviously not talking about detailed narrations (you don’t have the words to spare, nor that much creative license), but you can definitely include distilled versions of them. Simply mentioning that you’re an aquaphobe learning how to swim, for example, can tell your employer plenty about the fact that you take adversity on the chin and that you have a mind to surmount obstacles. Personal touches like these help highlight crucial aspects of your personality that might help distinguish you from other applicants, so it’s a good idea to include something about your life. Another way you could benefit from a personal addition is to use it to demonstrate your more personable traits. This could be through humor, or a line or two about your charitable pursuits, or just what you enjoy doing in your free time. Either way, it helps paint you as more than just a robot with work experience, so be sure to make the most of it.

Maintain a Balance

So you’ve got to include aspects of your personality, personal pursuits, career progression, and current state of employment. While adequately covering all of those focus areas, you also have to flow so that your bio doesn’t read like a series of disconnected statements. And you have to keep to a very strict word count while doing all of the above. This can prove daunting, even for the best of us, and that’s why bio writing is more art than science. It’s also why revising your bio is a very tedious process that can involve hours of brainstorming with very little to show for it.

Watch a short video to learn more about What is a Biography

Bio Writers to Make Your Look Like a Million Bucks

If you’ve been having trouble with figuring out just the right words to put in your bio, or you’re second-guessing what your bio should look like – our team of Professional Bio Writers can help. From techies to published authors, finance execs to teachers – our versatile team of bio writers understands what every bio needs and delivers. [post_title] => How to Write the Perfect Professional Bio [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-the-perfect-professional-bio [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2616 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2608 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-15 06:51:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:51:31 [post_content] => writing SEO friendly content Search engine optimization, or SEO, as it may be known to most of you, is a rapidly evolving discipline that has been on the rise ever since Google took the world of search engines by storm. Accoridngly, learning how to write SEO-firendly articles is number one on the checklist of content producers that want to ace SERPs.

Keep Up-to-date with Google

Last year, Google announced the addition of core web vitals and page experience signals as ranking factors in search results. We won't get into too much detail about what these are specifically just yet, but you should know that your core web vitals tell Google how quickly and smoothly a page loads in front of a user. The other page experience signals are, more or less, boxes you need to check regarding the security of your connection with your users, and that they're being delivered a quality experience that isn't overly annoying or outdated. All we mean to do with the above is highlight that the field of search engine optimization is constantly evolving. With Google needing to constantly roll out updates to combat people finding shortcuts to ranking better (such as black hat backlinking practices) or breaking ranking factors altogether and using them for gaming the system (such as keyword cramming). While Google does come out with its SEO guidelines to help people understand how they can improve their website and put out content in a way that helps them rank better, what Google does not do is tell you exactly how searches are ranked and how much each individual metric contributes to your overall ranking. For all of these reasons and others, keeping up with all of the advancements taking place within the field of SEO can be a difficult task, even for those of us that call SEO their bread and butter.

Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content

If you've tried learning how to do your own SEO before, and you found the process to be too tedious or difficult, then this article is for you. Not only will we go over exactly how you can go about making your content SEO friendly, we'll also let you know key tips and tools you can use to help you with the process.

Tip 1: Select the right topics to write about

A great way to make a splash on those Search Engine Ranking Pages (SERPs) is to select topics that are currently garnering interest amongst the public. Even if your website or business's actual domain area isn't the most popular, get creative and find ways to link it to those popular topics. Remember, even the best-written content won't garner views if you're writing about something that no one wants to read about. This is where learning how to use Google Trends for SEO could be beneficial. Content marketing strategies are great and all, but you'd have to be a magician to get people to read an article they have no interest in. If you're worried that focusing on topics of interest will have you competing with industry giants for rankings, don't be. Remember, recency is also a factor in search results ranking, so simply the fact that you're posting your stuff today is going to get you at least some preferential treatment. And if your stuff is original and out of the box, providing a fresh perspective or some expertise that can't be found elsewhere, that's going to push you up even further. Besides, you shouldn't be worried about the competition anyways; SERPs are full of examples of Davids who counter Industry Goliaths, and the next one might just be you. As long as you can focus on providing quality experience to your users (and do so consistently), it'll always shine through sooner or later. Of course, this is where our article writing service can give you the leg up.

Tip 2: Keyword research is still paramount (and probably will continue to be for at least a while)

SEO-friendly content needs strong keyword research There's one aspect of SEO that hasn't changed much over the years: Using high-interest keywords still helps you rise to the top of rank results. You should make it a routine practice to check out keyword rankings relating to your topic area, once before you've written your piece and once after it's done, right before you publish. Why before you publish? To make sure you haven't overused your keyword or used too many keywords in your text. A piece that's 500 words long shouldn't try to target ten different keywords, and it shouldn't contain fifteen instances of your primary keyword. Black hat hacks like these were popular during the early years of SEO, but Google's done plenty to prevent them from being viable today. Don't fall victim to your own bad practices. For a standard guideline regarding how many instances of a particular keyword should be in an article:
  • Keep yourself to two to three instances at most for a 500-word article
  • Add one for each additional 500 words when it comes to longer articles.
According to this directive, a 2000 word piece should contain six instances of a particular keyword. Naturally, if your keyword is a generic term, you might find yourself using it a bit more, and that's okay, but try to avoid being too repetitive with it. Try for synonyms or abbreviations, anything you can do to avoid making it seem like you've crammed; if you can tell, chances are Google can too. Aside from this, try to be as strategic as you can with your keyword use. Don't rush to put out a piece relating to each popular search term you can find that's relevant to your business. There's such a thing as Keyword Cannibalization; it's where your own articles are competing with one another for the same keyword and actually taking traffic away from one another. We're sure we don't need to spell it out for you, but this isn't a good thing. When it comes to terms that are highly relevant to your website, try to put out long-form content that covers as many aspects of the term as you can, rather than rushing to release content relating to every term people could possibly search for. Be strategic with your content; it will pay dividends in the long run. Oh, and speaking of being strategic…

Tip 3: Plan out an approach to content that lets you make the most of different types of articles

Google and other search engines tend to love websites that are regularly updated. This means releasing daily content for many website owners, even if that content is just a rehashed version of an article they'd put out the previous week. This might work for some people, but it certainly isn't a surefire way to succeed with your content. If you're going to have to repeat yourself eventually, and you know it, you should plan out your topics so that you maximize the amount of time there is between two similar articles. You can use the time in between to figure out how you can cover the same topic or domain area from a different perspective.

Struggling for Ideas? Well, that’s what professionals are for. Our diverse team of content writers are not only well-versed with creating compelling and unique content – but at scale.

Another way to keep things fresh is to cover topical, time-sensitive developments within your focus area. For example, you can write a long-form cornerstone article on content writing best practices, and that article can remain the same for a long while. Instead of writing about that topic again, you can later release content about how opinion pieces are the way to go in 2021 and fill that article with reasons for why perspective based content is especially relevant after we've all experienced a lockdown that cut us off from being exposed to other opinions. While opinion pieces don't inspire the sort of trust that a faultless factual piece might, they're excellent for increasing engagement and getting people talking in your comments section. There's no real substitute for user engagement and no second-guessing the fact that search engines are partial towards content that engages readers, so why not experiment a bit and get creative. And creativity doesn't just have to do with how and what you write about.

Tip 4: Use every channel (and platform) at your disposal to make people aware of the content you're publishing

social media like facebook is key for SEO content Social Media is a great way to get more eyes on your content. If an article on your site isn't getting the traction you'd want it to, posting a link to the article on your business's Facebook page along with a captivating tagline or quote from the article might be just the thing to get those numbers up to desirable levels. More clicks mean more views, and more views mean preferential treatment within search results, so don't be shy about plugging your content wherever you can. There was a time when businesses just needed to have a listing in the Yellow Pages, but that time has long since passed. Now businesses are everywhere, from Facebook and Instagram to Twitter and LinkedIn. There's no reason your business shouldn't have a face on each and every one of these platforms. If you pay enough attention to what works on each of them, you might just find that one, in particular, is extremely conducive to the type of content you're putting out and gets you more traffic than the rest of them. Once you know this, you can start focusing more on generating more content for that platform and using that content to generate more traffic for your e-commerce website or storefront. A content writing service can be your saving grace here. Getting people to your content isn't everything though, you've also got to think about where people are going from your articles…

Tip 5: Make sure you put the right links in your content (and the right type of links as well)

Everyone knows not to link to their competitors. But if you've been in the content game as long as we have, you might also know that you can't just back up your own content with any material you can find that supports your claims. There's a LOT of repetition on the Internet. You can Google any topic and find twenty different articles all saying the same thing using slightly different words. You might think that linking to any one of them serves the purposes you need for your articles, but that just isn't true. So what then, do you link to the best written of those articles? Not always. Informational content, such as the stuff you'd find on a .edu or .gov site. .Org sites are good, too, as long as the article you're linking to isn't trying to sell something itself. SEO-friendly content is written with the intent to inform and it always tends to rank better and contribute more to the credibility of what you're saying than content that has an ulterior motive. Keep that in mind while you're selecting which articles to link to. Credible links get your website more "Authority". Authority is a holistic metric that determines how much clout you have within your domain or focus area. Quality internal links also help you gain authority since users can jump from article to article within your site without finding redundant or otherwise fruitless content. But if you're too liberal with your external links (i.e. links that lead out of your site) you can end up losing authority to the pages you link to. This isn't always a bad thing, but you should try to use "no follow" links for at least some of your outbound links for this reason. No-follow links prevent crawlers from passing authority along from your site to the site you're linking to.

SEO-Friendly Content by Experts

If you've enjoyed this list of SEO-friendly practices to help your website take off, consider reaching out to us to find out more about what we can do to help revamp your content portfolio. We've got years of experience in the industry and a long list of satisfied clientele to back us up, so why not give us a call. [post_title] => Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content to Gain Visibility on Search Engines [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => tips-for-writing-seo-friendly-content [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-15 06:53:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:53:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2608 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2598 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-08 08:17:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-08 12:17:26 [post_content] => Hire professional transcribers Speech recognition has come a long way and has been one of the leading developments in reach towards the Internet of Things. Now, with Google Home and Amazon’s Alexa, we can control just about any aspect of room ambience without moving an inch. While services like these might lead you to believe that speech recognition has evolved to the point where human transcription just doesn’t make sense anymore, we’re still far from being there yet. We’re not saying that speech recognition hasn’t grown by leaps and bounds in the past decade or so, far from it, in fact, it’s just that it’s not quite gotten to the point where it can be considered as reliable as the human mind. In other words, if you want accurate transcriptions where context, punctuation and accents are accounted for, going for a transcription writing service is your best bet. Before we can explore a comparison between these two methods, let us take a look at what both are:

Hiring Professional Transcribers Over Speech Recognition

Manual transcription is fairly straightforward. A person listens to an audio recording and jots down the contents; there isn’t much to explain there. To understand why human beings are better at this task, we must first understand how we interpret language. The human mind is a multi-track processor. This means that it can selectively and intuitively utilize multiple processes towards the same end, switching freely between those processes as the need arises. The most powerful tool we have at our disposal when it comes to understanding speech is the flexible use of context. We can glean details about the subject conversation like several speakers, roles in the conversation, subject matter, and key points, just from listening to the conversation for a small amount of time. Even if there are noisier sections, we can pause, rewind, and play again until we arrive at a reasonable guess for what is being said. If that doesn’t work, we can continue further along in the conversation and figure out what might have gone in a particular section through later references.

How Accurate is Speech Recognition

ASR, or Automated Speech Recognition, is the domain of computer science and technological research that deals with getting computers to understand the spoken word. In an ideal scenario, where you’re dealing with clean (noiseless), high fidelity audio, a computer can indeed measure up to human standards and even compete with top-notch transcribers. Just so you can compare, the human error rate during audio transcription is about four percent, while these artificial intelligence-based technologies usually hover around the five percent mark. That means that they’re almost as good if only slightly worse, than humans at transcribing audio. The ball game shifts a bit when we talk about LVCSR (Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition). These applications are categorized by an extremely large vocabulary of words and fluid conversation between multiple speakers. When it comes to these scenarios, the error rate for humans is still at roughly four to five percent, while their technological counterpart measures in at roughly 8 – 10 percent. An accuracy rate of 10 percent means an error every 10 words, which is far beyond the acceptable amount. But real-world applications are much, much worse. Say you have a phone call or a voice note you’d like transcribed. The background noise can make certain words hard for the speech recognition software to detect, but that’s to be expected. In computer science terms, when you use the word “noise” you’re actually describing different elements that obscure the quality of a particular frame (in the case of audio and video). Noise can come from various sources and increases as you increase volume and distance from the audio capture device. But noise isn’t just an environmental factor, at least not in traditional terms. You see, when we communicate over telephone lines, the audio signal generated by our voices is actually converted to an electrical signal, which travels across large distances and is then converted back into audio for us to hear. These conversions minimize line loss and maximize distance, allowing us to make phone calls across the world. However, “minimize” is a relative term here; while we can hear and understand a person speaking on a phone call, a computer might not be able to do the same. There are certain aspects of speech recognition that computers truly excel at. They’re many magnitudes of times faster, and as such, some programs can sift through hundreds of hours of audio in the time, it would take a human being to complete working on a one-hour transcription. However, to mimic a process as complex as understanding human speech, a computer must break it down into individual tasks. Preprocessing, feature extraction, acoustic modelling, language modelling, and decoding are all individual steps in a process designed to achieve the same results as human listening, but that doesn’t mean that both work in the same way.

Why Hiring a Transcription Service is the Better Option

This fluid use of context and a wider understanding of the way objects are related in the world gives human transcribers an edge over conventional computer-based means. Again, even the most advanced neural networks only attempt to mimic our faculty of working with context, and this mimicry is subject to our own understanding of how our mind works, which is admittedly limited. Systems designed by us to do something our minds do, when we ourselves only have a rudimentary understanding of the internal workings of the human mind, cannot reach the level of accuracy that a professional who has listened to thousands of hours of audio can offer us. Meanwhile, a computer application will break the process down into multiple simple steps, and by the end of all these processes, arrive at a transcription. While we did mention each of the steps that a hypothetical speech recognition tool could take to recognize patterns in speech, knowing what each of these means isn’t necessary for the purposes of this article. You need to know that certain aspects of spoken language don’t necessarily translate very well to the machine equivalent of the listening process. The main issues are as follows:

Punctuation

It can be difficult to determine how to punctuate a sentence heard over the phone or out of context, even for human transcriptionists. However, because we have a wider understanding of linguistic rules to work with, we can easily make educated guesses about where to put commas, periods, and semicolons and where to swap out a period for an exclamation mark, for example. A computer, meanwhile, can only attempt a verbatim transcription, which completely ignores punctuation within a sentence most of the time. What you’re left with is a mess of words separated by no more than a few sparse periods.

Filler Words and Offhand Sounds

These areother aspects of transcription that software fails to reliably account for. Filler words are commonly used unintentionally during the fluid speech, with the most easily explainable reason for their presence being a person struggling to reach for their next word. A program will not be able to distinguish that a person saying “what’s the word?” is actually trying to recall a word they can’t remember and will instead transcribe that phrase along with what was said previously. It sounds like “oh”s and “ah”s are just as difficult for computers to ignore, and they can make many initial drafts seem like gibberish to the intelligent reader. Characteristics of speech like a lisp or a stutter are no different from filler words and sounds. In fact, if anything, these are much worse, as they can affect even words the software would normally detect. Tweaking the software to work with these difficulties is often a very complicated process if it’s possible at all, and it might render the software incapable of recognizing normal speech.

Dialect, accents, and other intangible aspects of speech

While it may not have as much bearing on how a particular language is expressed in writing, locality does greatly affect the way we speak any given language. Differences in pronunciation and enunciation between two people within the same locality are often difficult, if not impossible, to account for, so a person speaking in a different dialect may as well be speaking a different language altogether. Creating software or training an AI agent to understand multiple dialects of the same language is harder than you might think. On some level, the software must determine which particular dialect is being spoken during the feature extraction process. The difficulty of this task is compounded when you have multiple speakers, especially speakers from diverse cultural backgrounds.

The need for edited transcriptions

Edited transcriptions are one possible solution to some of the problems relating to each of the previous aspects of translation. Instead of the verbatim transcription that software generates being the final product, a service provider will often offer some “post-processing” work, in the form of a human being going over the verbatim transcript and fixing minor errors, removing redundancies and filler, and generally improving its readability (by replacing incorrect homophones, for example). Since this involves essentially hiring a person to proofread a computer-generated translation, it eliminates the “automated” aspect of the process. Instead of using human effort to counter the weaknesses of a computer system (and still arrive at a final product that doesn’t meet the same standards as a professional transcription), why not replace the software application with human effort entirely? This is not to say that software-generated recordings don’t have their own audience. For some purposes, such as voicemail recordings and general surveillance, automated speech recognition makes perfect sense. In these cases, minor transcription errors can be overlooked in light of the cost-saving that ASR offers. This is also ASR’s greatest saving grace for applications where the volume of incoming data is far too high for a human transcription to be viable. In cases where high volumes and time-sensitivity factors are considered, edited documents offer the greatest compromise between ASR (which wouldn’t be accurate enough on its own) and professional transcription (which wouldn’t be as cost-effective. For more sensitive applications, especially those in which the contents of a recording are of critical value or where the quality of recordings is inconsistent or cannot be guaranteed, a professionally transcribed document always manages to edge out a computer-generated one.

Hiring Professional Transcribers Vs. Speech Software

As research into natural language processing and speech recognition applications begin to bear greater fruit, we may eventually arrive at a focal point where computer-generated transcriptions are virtually indistinguishable from professionally transcribed ones. We’re definitely not there yet, though, and given the breadth of problems that computer scientists must tackle to achieve this, it’s safe to say we won’t be there any time soon. While software may achieve great results for extremely specialized applications, a general-use speech recognition software that can reliably get the job done, regardless of the scope of the task, simply doesn’t exist right now. That’s why we’d suggest that you always opt for professional transcription service over an automatically generated one, especially if you’re invested in maintaining the quality of your final product. Get in touch and let’s get your transcription project off the blocks right away. [post_title] => Why Hire Professional Transcribers Instead of Using Transcription Software [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => why-hire-professional-transcribers-instead-of-using-transcription-software [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-02 08:20:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-02 12:20:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2598 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2593 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-03 08:12:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-03 12:12:29 [post_content] => Eulogy speech writing Bereavement can be one of the most difficult aspects of life to cope with. Loved ones inevitably pass on, but writing a eulogy speech that does justice to the loss you feel is one of the hardest things you’ll ever have to do. If you (or someone you know) have lost someone recently, then you’ll know the feeling of disbelief that comes with such an event. That, and the whirlwind of emotions that goes along with it, is enough to deal with on its own. Yet with every passing, those left behind are entrusted with one fundamental task by the recently deceased: to live on. The first step towards a continued life is to put those who are gone to rest.

Eulogy Speeches – Reminding Ourselves that We Grieve Together

For the sake of formality, let us start by taking a look at the definition of a eulogy. A eulogy is a speech given during a funeral as a tribute to the recently deceased – one that recounts moments shared with them, as well as bits and pieces of what you’ll remember them most fondly for. It’s considered an honor to be asked to give a eulogy for someone you knew, as it tends to show just how great a part you played in their lives, and how great a part they played in yours. A eulogy can present itself as a very tricky task, especially given the breadth of what it aims to achieve, as well as the gravity of the situation. You’re not just saying good bye to someone who was a close companion in one way or another, you’re also addressing a gathering of people who are similarly bereaved and grieving with you. When you speak, you are speaking as the singular voice that ushers that lost loved one to the great beyond – your words forming the ending note in the final chapter of their lives. You speak on the behalf of everyone who grieves with you, and sometimes on the behalf of the deceased themselves. The aim is to say good bye in a way that respects the time you spent together, and steels everyone in preparation for times to come. Naturally, this is quite the responsibility, and most of the time, the person taking it on is one of the people who are most affected by the loss. Most people will not give many eulogies over the course of their lives, which means advice (at least advice that is based on experience) will be hard to come by, and undoubtedly very difficult to ask for. Moreover, every person is different, meaning every eulogy is different, and different people will approach the task in very unique ways. There are some key considerations, however, that remain common throughout parting addresses, and knowing these can help you figure out how you want to word and deliver your own piece. To start off…

Tips for Writing a Touching Eulogy Speech

We mentioned this in passing earlier, but it deserves an explicit mention: There’s no such thing as a clinical approach to eulogy writing. You can seek inspiration wherever you might find it, but always remember that the person you’re writing about, and the assembly you’re speaking to, are both entirely unique to your situation. As such, adopting a formulaic approach to speech writing can take away from the essence of what a eulogy aims to achieve. You want your eulogy to be guided by a respect for your feelings, and the feelings of the people you’re addressing; and not by a desire to check the boxes for what makes a complete speech.

1.    Remember to Talk to Other People Who Were Close to the Deceased

This is also critical, and applies even more so when you’ve been asked to deliver the eulogy by someone who, in your mind, was closer to the deceased than even you. You should make sure that your address is not focused exclusively on moments you shared with the dearly departed, without giving room for other people in the assembly to connect to it. Remember, the purpose of a eulogy is twofold – you’re honoring a lost loved one and acknowledging their loss, while also attempting to make the process of bearing that loss easier on those around you. Make sure your own stories are interspersed with mentions of other people who are present, if not their stories as well. Being included in the process of informing your eulogy helps people feel less isolated in their grief, which in turn makes grieving a less difficult ordeal. Also, while you had your own unique connection to the deceased, so did many of those around you at the time you’re delivering your address; it’s important that you acknowledge those connections when you’re speaking to everyone.

2.    Decide on a Structure for Your Funeral Speech

There’re two basic approaches to how you can structure a eulogy, you can either follow a chronology, or a mood board.

Chronology-based eulogy

It will focus on outlining a timeline of events in the deceased’s life, from when and where they were born to the circumstances of their eventual passing. A life is a very long ordeal to sum up in just a few minutes though, so write down significant events you want to mention before you actually write your piece so that you don’t forget to mention something that shouldn’t have been omitted. Significant events can be anything including a marriage or a fateful encounter with a significant other, the birth of a child, service in the military, etc. Once you’ve written your speech around these events, you can include a brief paragraph that summarizes the different ways in which the deceased managed to enrich the lives of those around them.

Mood boards

These are slightly different. Instead of focusing on a series of events in chronological order, you group anecdotes or significant encounters into different segments depending on how they’d make the audience feel. The passing of a loved one is a decidedly somber and sorrowful occasion, but that doesn’t mean the tone of your eulogy has to be exclusively depressing throughout. For example, you could start with a note about the many hardships the person in question faced throughout their lives (sorrowful), and transition to how they managed to surmount all of those hardships (uplifting), and end on a comment about how the departed taught us to strive to achieve great things even in the face of overwhelming opposition (hopeful). If a particular negative section goes on a little too long, you could include a light-hearted anecdote or comment, especially if it is one that’s easy to associate with the memory of the deceased. Structuring your eulogy this way helps you find ways to incorporate elements of relief (such as humor) while still keeping the overall tone respectful, though it does require you to leverage your writing and speaking skills a bit more than a chronology. Speaking of which…

What Do You Say in a Eulogy - Pick Your Words Carefully

Keep in mind that the speech you’re writing is meant to be delivered at a funeral. Most of the time, that means no overly verbose phrases or flowery language, but you’ll know your own situation best. Keeping things as simple and colloquial as possible is usually a good thing; you want to think of the eulogy as a sort of monologue in a conversation between you and the assembly. However, it’s important to avoid getting too casual with your speech as well, at the risk of sounding crass or inconsiderate. Remember that there are others in the audience who’re facing this with you, and don’t say anything that might potentially offend someone’s sensibilities or cause them pain. This applies especially to the inclusion of humorous anecdotes; while these can provide some much-needed levity, they’re also just as likely to rub people the wrong way when executed poorly or inappropriately. Another aspect to “picking your words” is including bits and pieces of common and repeated phrases that people might’ve heard from the deceased. These can help lend emotional gravity to your writing, and make it easier for the assembly to connect to what you’re saying.

Make Sure Your Address Is Appropriate for your Station

A husband or wife delivering a eulogy in honor of their partner, or a child mourning a parent, can speak about just about any subject matter so long as they phrase it appropriately. However, these people may not always feel up to the task of delivering a speech, and may ask someone to step in for them. In cases like these, it is important to respect the difference in standing between the person delivering the speech and the person who asked them to deliver it. The same way, if you’ve been tasked with delivering a eulogy for a friend while their family are in attendance, it’s important that you don’t overstep and say things that upset the family.

Maintain a Positive Disposition (or as much of one as you can)

Once again, the passing of a loved one is a decidedly undesirable event. There’s no two ways to put it, and no way to spin it into a silver lining, that’s just how grief works. Always keep in mind that your eulogy’s main purpose is to help soothe the pain that the most important members of the assembly are feeling. This is why you should be extra mindful of these people and what they need to hear from you, both when you’re writing the eulogy and delivering it. With speech writing, it’s a matter of picking the exact right words and putting them in exactly the right place, while when speaking, it’s a matter of how you deliver those words. Especially when you’re covering subject matter that’s on the heavier side of things, you should be aware of the people around you and how your words are making them feel. Taking a moment to pause to collect yourself, or to give someone a kind look and a nod of reassurance, can go a long way towards helping them remain strong. Beyond this, it’s important to balance out the heavier, longer parts of your speech by having briefer, lighter anecdotes in between them. This helps make the speech less emotionally draining as a whole, both for you as a speaker, and everyone present in the assembly.

Don’t Feel Pressured

This applies especially to people who aren’t used to giving addresses, especially during difficult times. You might find yourself getting crushed under the weight of the immense responsibility that’s been placed on you. Nobody’s a “pro” at delivering eulogies, and even if experience were abundant (which it isn’t), no amount of practice can help prepare a person for events when they lose someone important to them.So if you find yourself getting emotional while writing your speech, or you feel like you can’t do justice to the task, be sure to remind yourself that you’re grieving too, and that nothing takes precedent over that. Focus on your emotions regarding the deceased, and try to use those emotions as the basis for your speech rather than adherence to a guide. Don’t try to seek out the perfect words, that’s not what a eulogy is for, and it could take you more time to find these words than you have on hand.

Eulogy Speech Writing Services Can Help Put Your Emotions into Words

We understand that grief is a slow, arduous process, and one that can’t be rushed. If you’re having a rough go at things in the wake of someone’s passing, we can help you find the right words, or at least a worthwhile substitute.

If you’d like to know more about our speech writing services, please give us a call at 1-877-897-1725 or start chatting with our representative today.

[post_title] => Writing a Touching Eulogy Speech for the Perfect Good Bye [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-a-touching-eulogy-speech-for-the-perfect-good-bye [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-08 07:07:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-08 11:07:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2593 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 10 [current_post] => 2 [in_the_loop] => 1 [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2643 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-19 08:57:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-19 12:57:30 [post_content] => White Paper writing What is a white paper, and why has this inbound marketing channel become such a key part of online marketing strategies for businesses. Well for one, it is a deep-dive form of content that makes use of reliable resources and case studies with the purpose to educate readers regarding a particular topic. Such content pieces are great for businesses to present themselves as leading experts in their fields and attract other experts and customers to their products or services. Writing and formatting a white paper is in many ways similar to writing an eBook, with the only difference being that whitepaper writing requires a lot more research and knowledge on the given subject. Whitepaper writing requires dedication and a commitment to producing content that is unparalleled. Doing this in one day is a Herculean task best left to experts. This is where our white paper writing service comes in. With a team of expert white paper writers with diverse expertise, you can rest assured; we’ll deliver well above expectations.

Writing a White Paper Quickly

White paper writing 2 The initial part is the hardest mainly because of a load of information at your disposal. Getting lost in this information is highly likely and presenting findings and data without following a narrative is even more so. Luckily, with our tips and tricks, you’ll find the going easier.

1. Topic Selection

When it comes to topic selection, writing on any industry-relevant subject is not a good idea. You need to understand what your audience will connect with the most and how your qualifications come into play. Additionally, it would also help if you chose a topic that was only briefly covered by others. You can also network with experts within your organization or use other crowdsourcing techniques to have a better command of the subject. If you want your paper to get featured on other websites or SERPs, you should focus on creating a unique paper and filling a gap within the content already available. One great way to select a topic is by starting an online poll. Polls will help you get an idea of what your readers are interested in while also getting them excited for an upcoming paper.

2. Target Audience

Your target audience will determine the kind of tone, voice, and research that will be required for the paper. For example, if the purpose of your paper is to attract B2B customers, then perhaps adding technical jargon will not be a problem. However, if your target audience is not well-versed in the subject, you may need to take a different approach. Additionally, you should also focus on relevant keywords and the platforms where the audience will read your content. Choosing specific platforms will also help later on when you’re outlining and formatting the paper.

3. Intro and Conclusion

Why should your readers get excited about reading the paper? The introduction should include a brief description of what the paper includes and why readers will benefit from it. Most readers decide whether they’ll read an entire paper after reading the introduction. So, make sure to grab their attention and tell them why they should continue reading. Address the value of information and the benefits of your paper early on. The conclusion will help readers make a final decision about the entire paper. This section is where you can market the company’s products or services and persuade the audience to take a specific action. Adding business details and a CTA is best left for the outro of the paper.

4. Useful Information

You might see a paper as a perfect opportunity to promote your business and its products or services. However, it'll be best not to forget that the whitepaper's main purpose is to provide useful information and increase your readers’ knowledge. Additionally, this is also your chance to present yourself as a trustworthy industry leader, and a salesy paper will not be sufficient to do that. Use reliable sources, data, and stats and provide expert opinions on them instead of mere advertisements.

5. Keep Building on First Draft

You should draft several copies of the paper down the line to ensure no useful information was left out. You can keep updating the white paper and improving on it even after the first draft is out. One great way to do this is to write several copies and take a fresh outlook each time. You can also have other experts or professionals within the organization give it a read to spot any errors in the document.

6. Grabbing the Readers’ Attention

The technicalities and formalities included in writing a paper can make the tone of it extremely dull. However, instead of focusing on numbers and statistics, you should try adding more value with a perfectly flowing conversation. Keeping your readers’ attention from beginning till the end in a detailed and thorough paper might be difficult. However, as long as you follow the above-mentioned tips, you’ll be able to write a compelling copy.

Formatting a Whitepaper

Formatting a whitepaper When you’re formatting a whitepaper, you should remember to include an easy-to-read and clear title page. The title page will include the subject of the paper, names of experts who have helped create the document, publication date, and author name[s]. You should also divide your paper into headings, subheadings, and sections. This will help you keep your paper organized and provide a better reading experience. Typically, H1 and H2 headings are used in a paper for headings and subheadings, respectively. It’s also pertinent to note that not all pages of your paper need to be text-heavy. You can present highlights, critical details, and takeaways in a separate section of the document. Using colours will also help readers to find important chunks of information. However, remember not to use red, as red is mostly associated with edits in a file. Easy one-pages can also be used for a summary of the text-heavy sections of your paper. Finally, you should also ensure that your paper feels and looks consistent throughout. Typography, colours, and visuals will play an important role in shaping the readers' experience, so it’s also important to give special attention to such elements. The following are some important sections of a typical white paper:
  • Title
  • Abstract
  • Problem statement
  • Background
  • Solution
  • Conclusion
  • References

White Paper Mistakes to Avoid

Whitepaper mistakes to avoid Since white paper includes a lot of research and analysis, it’s always important to keep in mind the mistakes you’re likely to make and should avoid. Keeping this list in front of you will help you focus on the proper direction for the paper while avoiding mistakes that can lead to a poor reading experience for your audience. Let’s take a look at some common paper writing mistakes you should avoid at all costs:
  • Not conducting adequate research.
  • Making it sound like a sales pitch.
  • Not following a narrative or a story.
  • Creating a bad design for the paper.
  • Not providing relevant examples or supporting your arguments.
  • Making last-minute changes.

Types of Whitepapers for Businesses

Contrary to popular belief, this type of content writing is not new. The term was first used in 1922, when the British Government published the Churchill White Paper of 1922. A white paper, if well-written- will give your company a competitive edge and present you with an opportunity to influence readers to pick a particular solution for an existing problem in your industry. White papers are a great way to steer the decision-making process of your current or potential customers in a way that’s beneficial to the business. There are several types of white papers companies can use. Let's take a look at the six most popular styles:

1. Educational

As the name suggests, this white paper is used to inform and educate readers regarding a specific topic in a particular industry. The core function of this content is to provide valuable information and answers to the questions that a company’s customers and prospective customers might have. The focus of this is to teach customers what they don’t already know and present a guide. You can use inbound marketing tactics and write how-to’s or give an in-depth analysis of a new industry or technology when writing an educational white paper.

2. Problem Solving

A problem-solving white paper requires persuasive writing techniques, credible sources, and a mature tone. You should think outside the box to present solutions to a problem your customers might have. Of course, the purpose of this type of white paper is to push out your products and services in a subtle manner. However, in doing that, you should focus on presenting unique ideas and steps to solve a particular problem. Think of the solutions that already exist and how you can cater to the same problems with a different approach. Problem-solving whitepapers are also great for sharing company values and beliefs.

3. Technical

A technical white paper provides technical details about an industry, products, services, or technology. You can offer details of your particular products and how to use them in this document. To strengthen the credibility of your technical white paper, you can also present some visuals and case studies. Typically, the purpose of this document is to attract technical buyers to your particular product or service. Your focus should be on your audience and making the copy error-free, concise, and easy to comprehend.

4. Market Research

A whitepaper based on market research includes an executive summary that highlights important data and provides a professional analysis of it. This document typically includes a lot of graphs and interesting analyses or arguments. Such white papers are excellent for PR, and they can either present trends, highlights, and findings or an argument based on the data presented. You can evaluate recent updates on a particular topic in your industry and present interpretations or predictions based on them.

5. Visionary

Typically used by technology-based companies, this type of white paper shows a reader why a particular business is trustworthy and best for long-term partnerships. This document gives innovative insights and provides arguments for why some products or services will never become outdated. You can also use this copy to showcase the visionary experts who work at your organization.

6. Knowledge Papers

Used for both ATL and BTL campaigns, these papers include a debate-style writing technique that puts you in a credible, authoritative, and visionary position. You can choose to address an existing industry debate or create a new one. However, the focus of this paper will be to make your readers listen, thus making persuasion a critical part of it.

Do You Need Help Creating a Whitepaper for Your Business?

We have several years of experience and a proven track record of customer satisfaction when it comes to creating compelling whitepaper copies for businesses. We provide 100% original content, accommodation for urgent requests, proofreading and editing services, unlimited revisions, 24-hour customer support, and ghost-written copies for all our clients. So, if you’re on the lookout for experts in business, technology, hybrid, or product comparison-related white paper writing services, contact us now by calling (877) 897-1725. [post_title] => Writing and Formatting a White Paper Fast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-and-formatting-a-white-paper-fast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 09:03:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 13:03:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2643 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 135 [max_num_pages] => 14 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => 1 [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => 1 [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => afb69197a93a4f2cdd3e4767a2345262 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
Writing and Formatting a Whitepaper in One Day feature

Writing and Formatting a White Paper Fast

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                    [post_content] => Content writing topics

Are you at a loss for content writing topics for your blog? There are plenty of evergreen topics that suit just about any blog. Read on to find out.

1. Advice and Opinion Pieces

Life advice can be a great way to drive readership up, especially if you've cultivated a following based on opinion pieces. Posts like these give you a chance to form an intimate connection with your readers by providing solutions to their problems. You could talk about anything that relates to your niche. The best thing about advice is that it doesn't require much substantiation, so instead of backing everything up with data, you just have to sit down and think with an open mind. The second best thing, meanwhile, is that advice like this doesn't get old, especially if you’re coming from a place of authority. While things of a time-sensitive nature, such as tech reviews and current events, get dated quickly, the way life works changes very slowly in comparison. So while a two-year-old review of a phone won't be relevant at all anymore, life advice from six years ago will be worth just as much to one of your newer readers.

2. Anecdotal Topics, Drawing from Personal Experience

Similarly to the previous entry, this one relies on the social capital that people associate with your brand name. They'll want to know what you've been doing with your life and the things that have helped shape you into who you are now. Writing about anecdotes from your life allows you to turn journal entries into blog posts. You don't have to read anything, you don't have to premeditate too much either. You just think of an event and let the words go flow. As with life advice, posts like these allow you to develop your writing style, adding and subtracting traits that will eventually help your readers truly identify with that style and brand voice. Since you're also talking about your own experiences here, you're also getting the chance to strike a chord with your audience in a way that few other things can. Giving people a window into yourself helps them connect to your writing, perhaps even relate to it, which is a great way to ensure that they keep coming back to your site for more. Again, because this event is specific to you, the written content will be too, and you don't have to worry about putting your own spin on things or trying to distinguish yourself from everyone else out there. It just comes with the territory by default. Your content writing efforts won't ever get dated because it's an event from your life, and your take on it. As long as you're smart about how you leverage your opinion for your specific audience, people will always be able to find worth in the post, even if the event itself becomes obscure overtime. If you've got the perfect anecdote, but you just can't find the right words to do justice to it, consider tagging us in. Our blog writers have helped many prominent bloggers structure their content to deliver the best possible experience to their readers while also staying true to the essence of the event

3. Focus on Local Events and Attractions

writing about local events If your business has a local element to it, whereby you’re providing services within a geographical area, covering local events or places is a great way to engage potential customers. Every big city's got its own highlights, and you can take a visit to any easily identifiable hotspot and write about it to let your audience know what it's like and what you thought of it. Bonus points if the attraction you're discussing is unique to your locality. If you don't live in a big city and there's not much going on around your town, you can instead foucs on an event and subsequently pivot to a conversation about what’s happening where you are. If you're an avid traveler, blogging about the destinations, your visit, and the attractions within those destinations can be a great source of fresh content - especially if you can adequately capture the essence of that experience and explain it through your words. People are all about secondhand experiences – some might say a desire to live vicariously through others is what got blogging to really take off in the first place.

4. Write About Prevailing Social Issues

This is another type of opinion piece, but it deserves its own entry because it doesn't fall into any other categories. You can write about what you consider an "issue of our time", like climate change, problems relating to modernization and modernized societies, income and gender disparity, and many others. You can pick up any one of these issues and try to paint a clearer picture of them for your audience while also giving your own opinion as well. Tread the line carefully, though. Some topics can carry social importance, so adopting too radical a view may alienate some members of your audience. There's one of two ways to tackle such cases. Its best to adopt a more neutral standpoint that outlines mainstream arguments on either side, but you can also adopt a more candid approach. At the end of the day, it's all about the kind of persona you've built through your blog and how you wish to express yourself. Hot topics do draw big crowds, and your content writing will do well to tap into this.

5. Discuss the Journey of Learning a Particular Skill

blog writing about learning craftsmanship Some businesses, particularly those that have to do with craftsmanship, can use their blog posts to discuss the journey one of their talented professionals took in the pursuit of their craft. If you're a digital agency, you could have a piece written about one of your most senior graphic designers. If you're an independent blogger, you could write about a skill you'd learnt personally. Talk about what motivated you to start, how you developed that interest, and how much you've learnt up till now. Insightful, informative topics covered in a manner that serves to educate your audience are the perfect way for a blog to put out content that helps enrich an audience member's life. That's attention captured, and a reader who'll be returning to your blog to check up on updates in the future. Granted, the journey of learning the skill, or the expertise that goes into providing a particular skill, may become outdated overtime. If it does, you can discussthe evolution of your own craft and the differences between then and now.

6. Write a Fictional Anecdote

Generally, a blog is not fictitious. If anything, a blog is as far removed from fiction as it could be, since blogs deal with aspects of day-to-day life, experience-based accounts from real people. However, a great way to illustrate some abstract point, or demonstrate perspective, is to use a fictional event as the vehicle for it. A narrative is a great way to get readers hooked, and a fictional one is all the better. Rather than typing out your views, why not spin a story between two invented characters that sheds light on the merits of those views. This type of piece might suit some blogs better than others. Depending on how much you enjoy fiction, you could even make a fictional anecdote a regular part of your weekly or monthly offering. Even commercial websites could have a weekly section where the company mascot discusses the latest additions to their product catalogue.

7. Revisit Past Posts That Were Popular

Value added content When you've constantly been churning out content, you've likely revisited the same subject multiple times. Even if yours is a general-purpose blog that, for example, regularly comes up with lists of popular products in different eCommerce marketplaces. Any blog will have callbacks to content that was published earlier. By discussing pieces that received a lot of attention when they were first published, you let newer members of your audience know what they had to offer. In doing so, you're also allowing yourself to hook them with any one of your most popular titles. This strategy lets you capitalize on things that have already worked for you, is what we're saying. But it's about more than just that. If you're talking about technical content, a review of a past article could very well span an article in itself. You could discuss developments since the previous piece was written and address the technical shortcomings of the previous content. In doing so, you show your audience just how dedicated you are to your particular domain and also the depth of your knowledge within that domain. Based on our years of experience writing listicles for various blogs in various domains, we can tell you that a list of the best articles from the past year can be a great way to wrap up a year of great content, and it might just end up being your most popular piece to start off the next. If you'd like, we could even write it for you.

8. Share Your Opinion On Another Person's Opinion (or a Fresh Development).

Pieces like these are great for both establishing the personality of your brand as well as capitalizing on what's already been put out there. Don't forget to take advantage of what we call the trickle-down effect of popular content. If any popular content creator, policymaker, or celebrity comes out with an opinion that gets people talking, you can discuss those opinions for some pretty relevant press. Speaking of relevance, it plays a key role in driving the popularity of such a post. You've got to have a finger on the pulseof current affairs to benefit from pieces like these the most since they tend to have a very short period between having nothing out there regarding the event and being completely saturated with very similar content. For someone running a blog on politics, this can mean competing with other prominent politics and news blogs to be the first on the scene. If you feel up to it, you can even use articles like these to respond to the opinions discussed in the media you're covering. You let your audience know your take on a particular topic, ensuring that everything you're releasing yourself is wholly original. The best part is that in today's day and age, there's a lot of newsworthy developments constantly occurring, so you're not strapped for source material in the slightest. Of course, when you're covering something that's very recent, you can't really predict how much public interest a story will attract. Try to look for big names or popular people. If you're writing a finance blog,you can definitely do a piece on Apple CEO Tim Cook's new salary package and discuss developments in the company (and improvements in profit) since he took the helm.

To Conclude

That was our list of 8 timeless content writing topics. If you'd like to know more about value-added content, find out here. If you'd like to know more about our services and how we can help you revamp your content portfolio, click here to send in an inquiry.

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Let our team of article writers create content that gets your results. [rfp_banner_form formnum="1"]
[post_title] => 8 Timeless Content Writing Topics for Your Blog [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-timeless-content-writing-topics-for-your-blog [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 11:06:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 15:06:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2656 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2646 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-25 09:41:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-25 13:41:52 [post_content] => Rules for writing great articles Writing great articles is not a skill you can learn overnight. It may not be something you are born with, but it is definitely something you can master by putting in the hard work. It takes writers years to hone their craft, and even then, they cannot achieve perfection. In fact, it won't be wrong to say there is no such thing as perfect writing. Everyone has a unique way of expressing their thoughts and beliefs. What matters is how their words resonate with others. A good article can educate people about a new idea, whereas a great article can change minds and encourage people to take action. Whether it is something as simple as clicking on a link and making a purchase or something as complex as adopting a new lifestyle, powerful writing carries a lot of weight and is worthy of respect. If you are looking to improve your article writing skills, learning these rules can be a valuable addition to your arsenal.

Rule 1: Know Your Target Audience

Before you put pen to paper – figuratively, of course – you should ask yourself who you're writing for. Now, most people will say they write for themselves. This is often the correct answer because we're our own biggest critics. Nevertheless, whether you are writing an article for affiliate marketing or working on a magazine article, the first thing you need to do is determine your audience. If you write for a pharmaceutical company or a law firm, you must already have a clear idea of who will be reading your copy. However, if you are an employee at a content marketing firm or work as a freelancer, you may have to do a little research to create a reader profile. It will help you understand their interests and motivation to click on your post. You can start by asking yourself the following questions:
  • Who will read this article?
  • Why would they read this article?
  • What will this article do for them?
Once you have found the answer to these queries, you can get a step closer to writing great articles. Try and learn about the factors that may excite your readers and the things that may not sit well with them. Doing so will help you figure out how you can get your audience to see your point of view or buy what you're selling. However, if you want to grow as a writer, don't limit yourself to an ideal audience. Think about other people who may find your article exciting or may connect with it on an emotional level.

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Rule 2: Research, Research, Research

It is always a good idea to write on topics you are passionate about. Be it your love for abstract art or your interest in marine biology, try writing about things that bring you joy. Alternatively, if you have a strong but unfavorable opinion about something, your personal feelings will undoubtedly add some substance to your writing – as long as you don't make your post sound too biased. However, no matter how much you know about a particular idea, make sure to conduct in-depth research before creating an outline for your piece. Read as much as you can. Learn about the history and background of the topic and how others around the world may have perceived it. Many writers allot a specific time frame for their research. In theory, it may work. But depending on what you're writing and who you're writing for, it may not be a good idea to limit your research process to a few minutes. In addition, don't cut any corners. Poor research is among the leading reasons most articles fall flat. On the other hand, good research helps us build our knowledge and facilitates learning. It also makes us more confident in our writing while nourishing our minds. Your research can make or break the article. If you want your words to make an impact, back up your arguments with facts and figures.

Rule 3: Grab the Reader's Interest

Once a person clicks on your article, you merely have seconds to make an impression. Since your title is the first thing a reader sees after opening your post, you must take extra care to make it compelling and interesting. Ideally, your main heading should convey what your article is about without divulging too much. Sound confusing? Well, your title should be an accurate representation of what the reader will find in the content body. However, it should also create an aura of mystique without being misleading. The next thing you should write a short and concise introductory paragraph to draw in your readers. A large chunk of text right at the beginning of an article may distract the reader. Worst case scenario, it may even stop them from reading any further. Therefore, it is pertinent to keep your opening short and attention-grabbing. It doesn't have to be something extraordinary. But it should at least capture the interest of your audience and encourage them to read what you have to say. Consider keeping your intro limited to two or three short sentences. It can even be a one-liner, depending on how well you can craft it. If your words are easy to scan and provide value, there is a good chance your reader will also make an effort to explore the article. Tips for writing articles

Rule 4: Make Your Article Visually Appealing

One of the most significant rules of writing great articles is making them visually appealing. You can create an element of interest by adding stunning photos and informative videos to your content. Moreover, try to incorporate well-explained charts and intriguing infographics wherever you can in your post. Also, if you come across a graphic that is relevant to your article but seems complex, consider taking some time to explain it to your audience patiently. You can also create customized images to make your piece look more professional. It will also help break up the bulky wall of text. Most brands invest extensively to procure graphic designers to develop valuable marketing content. Another way to make your article more attractive is by writing shorter paragraphs. Negative space in between the short paragraphs can help break the visual clutter. It allows your audience to read and digest each point before moving on to the next one. Here are some more ways you can make your pieces more reader-friendly.
  • Cascading subheadings
  • Bold and italicized words
  • Hyperlinks
  • Bullet points
  • Embeds
These factors will breathe a new life into your articles and motivate your readers to spend more time on them. Also, once you are done with writing articles, don't forget to edit and proofread them. Our years of experience in this field have made us pros at writing content for your site. For more information, please feel free to give us a call.

Rule 5: Add Substance to Your Articles

How many times have you found an article on your newsfeed that had a fantastic title but didn't have any substance? Unfortunately, it happens a lot. These click-bait articles are usually packaged as something worthwhile. However, they rarely tell you anything new or valuable. Although these posts manage to fulfil their target by getting more clicks, they leave the readers frustrated and unsatisfied – which is the exact opposite of what you should aim for. After all, one of the most important rulesforwriting great articles is never to leave the reader dissatisfied or craving more. If you want to improve your article writing skills, aim to add value to your words. It should provide new information or a fresh perspective by viewing the topic from a unique angle. Instead of barely scratching the surface, take a deep dive into the subject and look for ideas that require a detailed and nuanced discussion. Your content should solve problems and present solutions. It should connect with people on a deeper level and stimulate their imagination. Creating value-added content will encourage your readers to visit your piece over and over again. Meanwhile, a shallow article may stop them from ever making that effort again. Moreover, if you have a strong opinion, don't be afraid to share it with the world. However, please keep yourself open to criticism and be gracious with the feedback you receive. After all, your readers have a right to agree or disagree with your words.

Rule 6: Don't Water Down Your Words

Want to write with conviction? Don't let your fears hold you back. More often than not, the fear of judgment and criticism refrain writers from reaching their full potential. It is easy to develop a mindset where you don't want to displease your editor or write something that your audience may not fully agree with. As a result, you start using soft language and adopt a pacifying tone. In some instances, it might work in your favor. However, in most cases, it makes your writing look watered down and ineffective. Your message may even get lost in translation if you spend too much energy on creating a perfect post that keeps everyone happy. Therefore, the next time you write an article and have the nagging fear of "what if they don't like it," please immediately push aside those negative thoughts. While it is essential to make sure your words don't spread misinformation, you must not let the fear of disagreement hold you captive. If you believe in a specific cause or an idea, write about it without entertaining any second thoughts. You can't please everyone. It would help if you accepted that there would be times when your message will not resonate with the readers, and that's completely fine. Receiving a negative comment or a harsh criticism may put you in a bad mood for a few hours. But don't let it stop you from writing articles that can add value.

Summing Up the Rules for Writing Great Articles

Writers never stop learning and growing. Hence there is no set formula that will enable you to produce brilliant content. Nevertheless, a few important rules of writing articles can set you on a path to success and help you create content that will stand the test of time. The rules include learning about your target audience, conducting in-depth research, and reeling in the reader with your compelling headline. Moreover, your article must have bullet points, images, graphics, and other visual elements to increase reader engagement. You can also add substance to your articles by asking the right questions and providing the readers with the correct answers. In addition, make sure you write with conviction and never water down your words due to fear of criticism. If you are interested in our article writing service, please drop us an email today. Our talented writers are experienced in all niches and can help you grow your business and reach a larger market segment. [post_title] => 6 Rules for Writing Great Articles [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 6-rules-for-writing-great-articles [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 10:16:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 14:16:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2646 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2643 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-19 08:57:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-19 12:57:30 [post_content] => White Paper writing What is a white paper, and why has this inbound marketing channel become such a key part of online marketing strategies for businesses. Well for one, it is a deep-dive form of content that makes use of reliable resources and case studies with the purpose to educate readers regarding a particular topic. Such content pieces are great for businesses to present themselves as leading experts in their fields and attract other experts and customers to their products or services. Writing and formatting a white paper is in many ways similar to writing an eBook, with the only difference being that whitepaper writing requires a lot more research and knowledge on the given subject. Whitepaper writing requires dedication and a commitment to producing content that is unparalleled. Doing this in one day is a Herculean task best left to experts. This is where our white paper writing service comes in. With a team of expert white paper writers with diverse expertise, you can rest assured; we’ll deliver well above expectations.

Writing a White Paper Quickly

White paper writing 2 The initial part is the hardest mainly because of a load of information at your disposal. Getting lost in this information is highly likely and presenting findings and data without following a narrative is even more so. Luckily, with our tips and tricks, you’ll find the going easier.

1. Topic Selection

When it comes to topic selection, writing on any industry-relevant subject is not a good idea. You need to understand what your audience will connect with the most and how your qualifications come into play. Additionally, it would also help if you chose a topic that was only briefly covered by others. You can also network with experts within your organization or use other crowdsourcing techniques to have a better command of the subject. If you want your paper to get featured on other websites or SERPs, you should focus on creating a unique paper and filling a gap within the content already available. One great way to select a topic is by starting an online poll. Polls will help you get an idea of what your readers are interested in while also getting them excited for an upcoming paper.

2. Target Audience

Your target audience will determine the kind of tone, voice, and research that will be required for the paper. For example, if the purpose of your paper is to attract B2B customers, then perhaps adding technical jargon will not be a problem. However, if your target audience is not well-versed in the subject, you may need to take a different approach. Additionally, you should also focus on relevant keywords and the platforms where the audience will read your content. Choosing specific platforms will also help later on when you’re outlining and formatting the paper.

3. Intro and Conclusion

Why should your readers get excited about reading the paper? The introduction should include a brief description of what the paper includes and why readers will benefit from it. Most readers decide whether they’ll read an entire paper after reading the introduction. So, make sure to grab their attention and tell them why they should continue reading. Address the value of information and the benefits of your paper early on. The conclusion will help readers make a final decision about the entire paper. This section is where you can market the company’s products or services and persuade the audience to take a specific action. Adding business details and a CTA is best left for the outro of the paper.

4. Useful Information

You might see a paper as a perfect opportunity to promote your business and its products or services. However, it'll be best not to forget that the whitepaper's main purpose is to provide useful information and increase your readers’ knowledge. Additionally, this is also your chance to present yourself as a trustworthy industry leader, and a salesy paper will not be sufficient to do that. Use reliable sources, data, and stats and provide expert opinions on them instead of mere advertisements.

5. Keep Building on First Draft

You should draft several copies of the paper down the line to ensure no useful information was left out. You can keep updating the white paper and improving on it even after the first draft is out. One great way to do this is to write several copies and take a fresh outlook each time. You can also have other experts or professionals within the organization give it a read to spot any errors in the document.

6. Grabbing the Readers’ Attention

The technicalities and formalities included in writing a paper can make the tone of it extremely dull. However, instead of focusing on numbers and statistics, you should try adding more value with a perfectly flowing conversation. Keeping your readers’ attention from beginning till the end in a detailed and thorough paper might be difficult. However, as long as you follow the above-mentioned tips, you’ll be able to write a compelling copy.

Formatting a Whitepaper

Formatting a whitepaper When you’re formatting a whitepaper, you should remember to include an easy-to-read and clear title page. The title page will include the subject of the paper, names of experts who have helped create the document, publication date, and author name[s]. You should also divide your paper into headings, subheadings, and sections. This will help you keep your paper organized and provide a better reading experience. Typically, H1 and H2 headings are used in a paper for headings and subheadings, respectively. It’s also pertinent to note that not all pages of your paper need to be text-heavy. You can present highlights, critical details, and takeaways in a separate section of the document. Using colours will also help readers to find important chunks of information. However, remember not to use red, as red is mostly associated with edits in a file. Easy one-pages can also be used for a summary of the text-heavy sections of your paper. Finally, you should also ensure that your paper feels and looks consistent throughout. Typography, colours, and visuals will play an important role in shaping the readers' experience, so it’s also important to give special attention to such elements. The following are some important sections of a typical white paper:
  • Title
  • Abstract
  • Problem statement
  • Background
  • Solution
  • Conclusion
  • References

White Paper Mistakes to Avoid

Whitepaper mistakes to avoid Since white paper includes a lot of research and analysis, it’s always important to keep in mind the mistakes you’re likely to make and should avoid. Keeping this list in front of you will help you focus on the proper direction for the paper while avoiding mistakes that can lead to a poor reading experience for your audience. Let’s take a look at some common paper writing mistakes you should avoid at all costs:
  • Not conducting adequate research.
  • Making it sound like a sales pitch.
  • Not following a narrative or a story.
  • Creating a bad design for the paper.
  • Not providing relevant examples or supporting your arguments.
  • Making last-minute changes.

Types of Whitepapers for Businesses

Contrary to popular belief, this type of content writing is not new. The term was first used in 1922, when the British Government published the Churchill White Paper of 1922. A white paper, if well-written- will give your company a competitive edge and present you with an opportunity to influence readers to pick a particular solution for an existing problem in your industry. White papers are a great way to steer the decision-making process of your current or potential customers in a way that’s beneficial to the business. There are several types of white papers companies can use. Let's take a look at the six most popular styles:

1. Educational

As the name suggests, this white paper is used to inform and educate readers regarding a specific topic in a particular industry. The core function of this content is to provide valuable information and answers to the questions that a company’s customers and prospective customers might have. The focus of this is to teach customers what they don’t already know and present a guide. You can use inbound marketing tactics and write how-to’s or give an in-depth analysis of a new industry or technology when writing an educational white paper.

2. Problem Solving

A problem-solving white paper requires persuasive writing techniques, credible sources, and a mature tone. You should think outside the box to present solutions to a problem your customers might have. Of course, the purpose of this type of white paper is to push out your products and services in a subtle manner. However, in doing that, you should focus on presenting unique ideas and steps to solve a particular problem. Think of the solutions that already exist and how you can cater to the same problems with a different approach. Problem-solving whitepapers are also great for sharing company values and beliefs.

3. Technical

A technical white paper provides technical details about an industry, products, services, or technology. You can offer details of your particular products and how to use them in this document. To strengthen the credibility of your technical white paper, you can also present some visuals and case studies. Typically, the purpose of this document is to attract technical buyers to your particular product or service. Your focus should be on your audience and making the copy error-free, concise, and easy to comprehend.

4. Market Research

A whitepaper based on market research includes an executive summary that highlights important data and provides a professional analysis of it. This document typically includes a lot of graphs and interesting analyses or arguments. Such white papers are excellent for PR, and they can either present trends, highlights, and findings or an argument based on the data presented. You can evaluate recent updates on a particular topic in your industry and present interpretations or predictions based on them.

5. Visionary

Typically used by technology-based companies, this type of white paper shows a reader why a particular business is trustworthy and best for long-term partnerships. This document gives innovative insights and provides arguments for why some products or services will never become outdated. You can also use this copy to showcase the visionary experts who work at your organization.

6. Knowledge Papers

Used for both ATL and BTL campaigns, these papers include a debate-style writing technique that puts you in a credible, authoritative, and visionary position. You can choose to address an existing industry debate or create a new one. However, the focus of this paper will be to make your readers listen, thus making persuasion a critical part of it.

Do You Need Help Creating a Whitepaper for Your Business?

We have several years of experience and a proven track record of customer satisfaction when it comes to creating compelling whitepaper copies for businesses. We provide 100% original content, accommodation for urgent requests, proofreading and editing services, unlimited revisions, 24-hour customer support, and ghost-written copies for all our clients. So, if you’re on the lookout for experts in business, technology, hybrid, or product comparison-related white paper writing services, contact us now by calling (877) 897-1725. [post_title] => Writing and Formatting a White Paper Fast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-and-formatting-a-white-paper-fast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 09:03:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 13:03:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2643 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2636 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-14 08:50:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-14 12:50:30 [post_content] => Title capitalization There are varying and often confusing rules to the use of the English language and none so much as title capitalization. With a language that's so pervasive and commonly used, you're bound to find different schools of thought that define the rules in their own way. When it comes to print media and even forms of online written content, the rules can get even more difficult to ascertain. Specifically, when you talk about writing an article, book or even a social media post – thes rules can get very detailed and all the more elusive. There is an abundance of different style guides out there, and even veteran writers can find themselves making mistakes every now and again. If you've found yourself stumped on your journey towards creating exceptional online content, this guide is for you.

Simple Rules for Title Capitalization

Before we can get into the exact nuances that matter with each style, let's look at the things that most styles have in common. To start off…

Always Capitalize the First and Last Words

Let's start with a fairly straightforward rule. Always capitalize the first and last word of your title, regardless of what those words are. For example: Incorrect: "tips to capitalizing titles" Correct: "Tips to Capitalizing Titles"

Always Capitalize oYur Nouns

While the jury might be out on other parts of speech, all of your mainstream style guides agree that nouns are of great importance in a title. A noun is defined as a word that identifies a class of objectsor a specific instance of that class, where the object in question can be any place, animal, or thing (real or abstract). Common nouns deal with class identifiers, while proper nouns deal with instances. Consider the following sentence: "Hello, my name is Jim." Now it's easy to tell that the word "Jim" carries importance here since it contributes heavily to the sentences communicated. So is the word "name", since it determines what the word "Jim" defines. In this case, "Jim" is an example of a proper noun, while "name" is a common noun, and when you're writing in prose or paragraphs, the rules state that you're only supposed to capitalize proper nouns, while common nouns are left in lower case unless they're starting off a sentence. Titles, however, are different. If there was a title in our sentence, the word "name" would also be capitalized, regardless of whichever style you're using. Pronouns are the same; you shouldn't write words like "I", "You", "We", or "Us" without capitalizing them. Common and proper nouns are both categories of principle words, as are pronouns, so you shouldn't usually leave them in the lowercase. So, in this case, our final statement becomes: "Hello, my Name is Jim" We're gradually getting closer to a statement that would function perfectly as a title, but we're not yet there. Next up…

Always Capitalize Your Verbs, Adverbs, and Adjectives

Words like "my" and "your" can be confusing since they function as different types of speech depending on how they're used. Technically speaking, they're attributive adjectives or adverbs denoting possession. This means that they commute the ownership attributed through a pronoun to a common noun or verb. If "I have a car", then that car, by definition, is "my car". The English language doesn't require you to capitalize your possession bearing adjectives and adverbs while writing sentences, but titles are different once again. All styles, including the APA (American Psychological Association), MLA (Modern Language Association), CMOS (Chicago Manual Of Style, at times, shortened to CMS), and AP (Associated Press) styles require you to capitalize all of your adverbs and adjectives, regardless of their position in a title. So going back to our initial statement, we had: "Hello, my Name is Jim" This now becomes: "Hello, My Name is Jim" Which is our finalized version of the title.

Always Leave Your Articles in Lower Case

Articles are words such as the, a, and an, which tell you whether you're referring to a general or specific object (i.e.the calculator refers to a specific calculator vs. a calculator, which is used to make general statements about calculators). As a rule of thumb, it's good to keep in mind that all articles are left in lower case unless they start or end your title.

The Tricky Part of Capitalizing Your title

Now that we've covered the broad strokes version of what to capitalize and what to leave in lower case let's look at parts of speech that have more intricacies involved.

Prepositions

The first area of contention, which most people tend to have trouble with, is prepositions. Prepositions are words that are usually used before pronouns and other nouns to define relations between objects. So when you say someone "arrived after dinner", or that "they were resting inside the room", the words after and inside are actually examples of prepositions. Other examples of prepositions include in, with, within, without, besides, among, around, above, below, across, against, and many more. Different schools of thought have differing opinions regarding what to capitalize and what to leave in regular case in a title when it comes to prepositions.

APA Citation

Regarding the APA citation style, you're only supposed to capitalize your longer prepositions (four letters or more) while leaving shorter ones in lower case. So when you're dealing with examples such as "A Walk Through the Meadow" you have to capitalize the word "Through", even though it's a preposition and it isn't situated at the beginning or end of your title. However, if you're using a shorter preposition, such as in the case of "A Walk in the Park", the preposition is written in lower case.

AP Stylebook

The Associated Press Stylebook is similar in that you only capitalize longer prepositions.

Chicago Manual of Style

The Chicago Manual of Style is slightly more difficult to deal with regarding what you should and shouldn't capitalize. The general rule is that you should never capitalize any prepositions or conjunctions unless:
  • They're used adverbially or adjectivally
  • They're used as conjunctions
  • They call for emphasis or are stressed upon
The first two rules are fairly direct and leave little room for the imagination. If you're saying"My Clothes are Soaked Through" or "Think It Through", you're using the word ‘through’ as an adverb, and it needs to be left capitalized. Similar is the case above when we talk about "A Walk Through the Meadow". The word through is being used as an adjective in this example, so it'll be capitalized once again. The third rule is a little more ambivalent, so you've got room to be creative in the third scenario. After all, what you choose to emphasize or draw the reader's attention to is entirely up to you as the writer, so you can justify capitalizing prepositions in some cases where they play a critical role in defining the meaning of your title.

MLA Style

The last major style we've got to look at is the Modern Language Association style, most commonly used in liberal arts or humanities texts. MLA advises you to leave all your prepositions in lower case, except when they're being used as subordinating conjunctions. We'll cover the specifics of these in the next section. For now, it's best to just keep in mind that MLA doesn't have a word length requirement when it comes to capitalizing prepositions within your title; if you're dealing with a preposition, leave it in lower case.

Conjunctions

There are two kinds of conjunctions in the English Language: subordinating conjunctions and coordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions are words that join two individual statements of equal relevance and importance. Think of words like "and" and "or"; when you say you'll "have either breakfast or lunch", or when you say that you "intend to visit the barbershop and the tailor", the order in which you use the noun terms is usually unimportant. This is because coordinating conjunctions join together two statements of the same grammatical relevance. One statement isn't a precursor or a prerequisite to the other. Subordinating conjunctions like "before", "after", and "until" are different. If you say"I ate before dusk", it's not the same thing as saying "It was dusk before I ate". In fact, both statements have mutually exclusive meanings. One says that you ate your meal before a certain time, while the other says that a certain amount of time had passed before you got to eat. Both cannot be true together. This is the key difference between subordinating and coordinating conjunctions. Subordinating conjunctions combine two statements where one statement is somehow dependent upon the other, either to show one as a necessary consequence of the other or the exact opposite. There's a lot of overlap between prepositions and subordinating conjunctions, and there're plenty of words (like all three of our examples up there) that function as both conjunctions and prepositions. When it comes to the Associated Press Stylebook or the APA Style guide, you're supposed to never capitalize your conjunctions, regardless of the type, unless they're more than four letters long. When it comes to CMOS and MLA, you can only capitalize subordinating conjunctions but never coordinating conjunctions.

Compound Words

Compound or hyphenated words require some handling if you insert them into your titles, but they're just a few rules you need to be aware of. They're the same for the Chicago, APA, and MLA style guides, so you don't have to worry about remembering different rules for each. To start off, if the compound word consists of two separate individual words that carry meaning, you'll capitalize both. An example of this is "self-report", which would be written as "Self-Report" if part of a title. Secondly, if you're dealing with a hyphenated word that consists of a prefix and another word, you'll capitalize just the prefix and leave the actual word in lower case. So the word "anti-inflammatory" would be written as "Anti-inflammatory". The same also applies to words with a single letter attached as a prefix (such as t-shirt, which would be written as T-shirt). Finally, if you're dealing with a compound word that contains prepositions, articles, or coordinating conjunctions, you'll leave the preposition, article, or coordinating conjunction in lower case while capitalizing the rest of the word as outlined above. So a word such as "holier-than-thou" would be written as "Holier-than-Thou" within a title.

The Final Word

Those are all the rules you need to know when deciding what should and shouldn't be capitalized in your title. Be sure to be mindful that the rules for sentence cases tend to be very different from title cases, and you'll be on your way to producing quality content. Of course, there's more to creating quality content, whether it be an article, book, or blog post, our team of content writers can help. [post_title] => Capitalizing Your Title: The Dos, Don'ts and Details [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => capitalizing-your-title-the-dos-donts-and-details [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 08:52:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 12:52:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2636 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2632 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content] => Tips for magazine article writing Do you wish to see your byline adorning the pages of your favorite publication? Do you want to build a reader base that awaits your next article with bated breath? Well, with a little bit of work, you can take your magazine article writing skills to the next level. The key to writing great magazine articles is to create content that engages from start to finish, and provides value to the reader. Regardless of which magazine you are aiming for, a few tips can help you master your craft and produce articles that any publication in the world would be proud to put out for you. However, before we delve into our tips on writing magazine articles, let's take a moment to understand how this particular form of writing differs from other online content writing.

Magazine Article Writing Vs. Other Forms of Writing

Writing an article for a magazine is not the same as writing one for a newspaper or an online directory. Moreover, the pieces you may see in a magazine are inherently different from the content you may find in journals and books as well. The tone and style of these articles vary with each publication, genre, and topic. However, two things set these pieces apart from other forms of writing – they allow more room for creativity and tend to be more visually appealing. While article writing and book writing also require creative input and critical thinking, drafting magazine articles allows you to play with different visual aspects. The use of colorful graphics and photographs to capture attention becomes a must. Furthermore, the length of magazine articles depends on the publication you’re writing for, what you're writing and who you're writing for. In most cases, writing content for the internet does not come with word count limitations. And insofar as books are concerned, you’re usually your own boss. But to give you an idea, an average magazine article can be anywhere between half a page to a dozen pages. Nonetheless, the word count for 12-page pieces is usually not as high as you'd think since they are interspersed with pictures and advertisements.

Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Connect

article writing Here are some tips on how to create magazine articles that will grab your readers' attention.

1. Write About Things You Are Interested In

You are more likely to create engaging content if you write about something you find intriguing or exciting. Your passion for a specific cause or topic will not only show in your work, but it will improve the quality of the output automatically. Articles written with passion are more likely to connect as they give readers a peek into your heart and soul. If you let your words reflect your love and devotion to the subject of your article, it will convince your readers to trust your judgment and authority. Magazine articles are an excellent medium for talented writers to showcase their skills while playing to their strengths. Moreover, publishers always prefer pieces that have an element of individuality. So, if you are particularly fond of something – be it music, traveling, cooking, or martial arts – make sure to use it as your calling card. However, just because you think you know a topic inside out doesn't mean you should cut corners while conducting research. It is essential to scour the internet and see what others are saying. Also, look for the latest stats and back up your claims with valuable insight.

2. Use Compelling Headings and Sub-Headings

Although this tip is not unique to magazine article writing, it requires a special mention. Your headline is the first thing a reader would see while browsing through the index of their favorite magazine or on the front page of their search engine. It is the focal point of your article, as it draws your readers' attention and encourages them to click on it. Many experts compare a well-crafted headline to a beautiful wrapping paper. However, in reality, it is a gift itself. An excellent headline, paired with equally compelling subheadings, will build the interest of your readers. Therefore, you should put in extra effort to create headlines that perfectly capture the essence of your article without giving everything away. Just make sure they are not misleading. It is also a good practice to include your main keyword in the main heading to make your post easy to discover. We'll discuss more on this later.

3. Reel In the Audience with a Unique Angle

One of the best ways to make your magazine article appealing is by ensuring it has a unique perspective. Start by creating a profile for your target audience and figure out where their interests lie. You can also look at the articles published by your competitors and industry giants. Doing so will help you determine which angles have been discussed before and which require more exploration. Instead of just scratching the surface, dig a little deeper and discover fresh viewpoints that establish you as an expert in the field. Even if you are writing on a mainstream topic, such as a new superhero movie that has recently hit the theatres, focus on the aspects that others have not bothered to explore. Remember, creating value-added content will keep your readers engaged and the publisher happy.

4. Keep It Short, Sweet, and To the Point

Brevity is the soul of any well-written content. If you want your magazine article to remain engaging from the first sentence to the last, you must make it easy to read and understand. It is generally good to use short and simple sentences. You should break your information into small chunks without leaving any room for ambiguity. Of course, depending on the nature of your article, you may have to use a few complex sentences. However, using too many complicated terms and long sentences can distract the readers. Moreover, make sure your readers can follow your train of thought without making much effort. Set the pace to match the article's tone, and don't let your message get lost between long sentences. If your audience finds your magazine article writing skills tedious or frustrating, there is a good chance they won't come back for more. Apart from using short and concise sentences, ensure your paragraphs don't exceed six lines. Adding bulleted lists to your content can also make it easy to skim and comprehend, attracting the readers.

5. Include Visual Elements

Break up huge chunks of text with striking pictures, powerful graphics, and well-explained charts. Including valuable visual elements in your magazine article is a foolproof way to increase audience engagement. They will give your audience a chance to rest their eyes without taking their attention away from the piece. With the right images, you can explain your idea or perspective without saying a lot. Additionally, photos and videos can make your content more memorable. They can help your readers interact with the piece, which may also increase their willingness to return to it. These are among the leading reasons why most publishers and brand owners invest extensively on graphic work to support their written content. How to write articles for magazines

6. Get Your Audience Involved and Invested

Starting your magazine article with a thought-provoking question or a shocking fact can help you grab the interest of your audience from the get-go. If your question is something that your readers can relate to personally, it will undoubtedly compel them to read further. However, to draw the attention of your readers, you must understand their desires and pain points. You should also know about your audience's gender, age, and location to choose your article's right style and tone. After all, the ideas that may intrigue women aged 30 to 45 are not likely to resonate with men aged 50 to 65. Furthermore, always address your readers directly. Writing in the second person will allow you to use words such as "you,” "your," and "yours." Your readers should feel as if you have written the article just for them. Once they build that connection, they'll stay hooked until the very last page. Also, make your piece sound like a discussion one would have with their friend. It shouldn't come across as a lesson or an essay. This magazine article writing tip will surely help your audience feel like a part of the narrative.

7. Don't State Facts, Tell a Story

Storytelling is an art. While anyone can share factual information, it takes expertise and a unique thought process to tell a story. As a writer, your biggest priority should be keeping your readers on their toes as they take in your words and build a world of their own. Whether you are writing about politics or deep-sea diving, your anecdotes and experiences can set your article apart from the rest. Sharing small stories also allows your audience to connect with you on an emotional level. It makes you and your words more relatable. People may not remember the statistics you've shared in your article. But they are most likely to remember the tidbits from your personal life that made their way onto the page. To create compelling content, take inspiration from your past experiences or create fictitious scenarios to leave your audience spellbound. You can also use analogies, quotes, and pop culture references to breathe a new life into your content.

8. Choose Your Keywords Wisely

Magazines are no longer limited to the print medium. You can now access almost every magazine online, with some charging a small subscription fee and others allowing you to read their content for free. Now, you may have heard that we should write for people and not the search engines. Our question is, why not write for both? Creating compelling and engaging content is just not enough. You also need to make your articles discoverable. Search engine optimization or SEO is the most effective way to make sure your audience finds your posts. You need tofind out what people are looking for and incorporate those keywords into your article. According to the SEO best practices, your main keyword should appear at the article's beginning, middle, and end. You can also include two to three additional keywords throughout the content. It will increase the chances of your article ranking higher on Google.

9. Wrap It Up Nicely

Don't let your closing statement go to waste. As you wrap up your article, utilize the last few lines to include a CTA call to action. It is essentially a way for you to tell your readers what to do next. Whether you are looking for feedback or want your audience to check out your latest video series, make sure to include a relevant link that directs them to your preferred webpage or service. The next step is to edit your content. You can use services such as Grammarly or Copyscape to ensure your article is free of mistakes and plagiarism. This is also your last opportunity to format the piece and ensure no negative spaces or weird indentations. Moreover, please use different font sizes for headings, subheadings, and body to increase readability and engagement. You can also use bold words and italicized sentences to make your critical ideas more prominent.

Magazine Article Writing Made Easy

To conclude, there are no set rules to writing a compelling magazine article. However, the tips mentioned above will enable you to break the mold by producing great content. A wisely chosen topic with a unique perspective and great headline can do wonders for your career. Similarly, short and clear sentences sprinkled with personal anecdotes can make your article more fun to read. If you feel a little lost in how to do go it alone, our article writing service could be the order of the day. Our team of experienced article writers ably supported by our team of expert designers can help you create magazine articles that hit the right note every time. [post_title] => 9 Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Hook Readers from Start to Finish [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 9-tips-for-writing-magazine-articles-that-hook-readers-from-start-to-finish [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2632 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2622 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-29 06:30:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-29 10:30:30 [post_content] => how to write product descriptions A compelling product description is crucial to the success of your eCommerce business. For those of you that don’t know, these are essential pieces of marketing copy that describes your product’s features and benefits to potential customers, persuading them to buy. Excellent product descriptions accurately capture the essence of a product to influence purchase decisions. In other words, they can well be the back bone of your online business’s success. Most entrepreneurs and marketers struggle with writing powerful product descriptions that can convert casual bowsers into life-long customers. They craft their copies around factual information and don't focus on the fact that they are selling an actual product to a real person. As a result, most product descriptions look like a block of information you are likely to find at the back of a product label. Below, we have put together some tried-and-tested tips on how to write a product description that converts.

1. Define Your Target Audience

Before you start writing a product description, you must understand the persona of your potential buyer. Defining your target audience can help you address them directly and engage them in a conversation. You can only create an impactful copy if you know who you're writing for and what would compel the reader to buy your product. It is also important to remember that the features that may entice one demographic might not be valuable to the other. Moreover, knowing your audiencecan help you select the right words and answer the right questions. It also enables you to find the perfect tone for the product.For example, you may want to inject humor into a product description for Christmas sweaters, but you can't use the same writing style to sell medical equipment or something more serious, such as coffins. Narrowing down the consumer characteristics can help you draft a copy that is equal parts informative and persuasive. If your product description addresses the pain points, values, interests, and frustrations of your buyers, there is a good chance they'd be willing to spend their hard-earned money on it.

2. Focus on Benefits over Features

Agreat product description must include all the information a buyer may need to make a purchase. It should tell the customer about the unique specifications of your product that set it apart from the rest and share any technical facts that may influence their decision. However, you must also understand that the features you are excited to write about might not necessarily interest your target audience. Some of them may even find it boring. The best way to retain customer attention and capture their interest is by explaining how the product will benefit them. Your copy should describe the advantages of a product and tell the buyer how it will reduce their pain points or enhance their quality of life. Before you start writing a product description, list down the top features of the item you are selling and then translate them into substantial benefits. Moreover, to prevent your copy from looking like an advertisement, refrain from using superfluous words. It would be best if you also avoided using superlatives that you can't justify. Following this tip will help you how to write a description that converts into a sale.

3. Elicit Emotions through Storytelling

A strong product description provides the buyers with all the relevant details and impacts them emotionally. According to a 2009 research study,holding a product in hand increases a person's desire to buy or own it. However, since they can't physically touch your product through their screens, your job is to paint a vivid picture that also packs an emotional punch. If you want your product descriptions to convert, make sure your content tells a story that your potential buyers can connect with. You can set the scene by telling them who created the product and what inspired them to do so. Taking the buyers on the journey of developing the product will allow them to relate to it. Depending on what you're selling, a personal anecdote or an entertaining fact about the product may also increase the buyer's interest. Nonetheless, you must make sure your words don't come across as dishonest or insincere. On the contrary, your story should enable customers to envision the product and how it would add value to their life.

4. Make It Sound like a Real Conversation

conversational product descriptions It may be tempting to sprinkle your product description with fancy words and literary references, but doing so can potentially turn away your customers. So, if you want the buyers to connect with your product emotionally and ultimately buy it, consider adopting a natural tone and using simple words. Ideally, a product description should sound like a conversation between friends. It should flow smoothly and have a life of its own. Instead of making sweeping statements, you should inform your buyers about the features and benefits just like you would share with a friend or a loved one. The customer should feel like you have their best interest at heart and that your words are not merely transactional. Product descriptions that use natural language and a friendly tone can help your eCommerce business  build a loyal customer base. Potential buyers are more likely to purchase if they find your copy to be honest and genuine. It would also help you stand out from the competition and make your products more memorable. If you need help writing product descriptions that sell, please feel free to give us a call.

5. Be Mindful of Power Words

Did you know there are certain words you can include in your product description to elicit a response from your target audience? More often than not, business owners and marketers end up using words such as "revolutionary" or "innovative"to describe a product when it is anything but that. Instead, sprinkle your copy with descriptive words and adjectives that may excite or intrigueyour prospective buyers. For example, if you are writing a product description for a dress, you can replace the terms "pretty" and "high-quality" with "sensational"and"luxurious." According to David Ogilvy, here are some of the most influential words that can turn a casual reader into a buyer.
  • Suddenly
  • Now
  • Announcing
  • Introducing
  • Amazing
  • Sensational
  • Revolutionary
  • Miracle
  • Magic
  • Quick
  • Hurry
Using these power words can take your product description to the next level.

6. Make Your Copy Easy to Scan

A great product description is easy to read and understand. Instead of explaining your product in lengthy and complex paragraphs, consider using simple sentences that get the message across. Customers have a notoriously short attention span when it comes to making online purchases. So, the best thing you can do to keep them interested in your product is to present them with a description that they can scan. For example, you can break down product specifications into bullet points to make them more reader-friendly. Moreover, different font sizes and lots of white space can help break the visual clutter. Your buyer shouldn't have to sift through long pieces of writing to find valuable information. Instead, you should present it to them on a figurative silver platter. Incorporating the product's name into the heading and using highlighted words can also impact the reader's attention span. If you’re struggling to create quality product descriptions at scale, our product description writing service might be what you need.

7. Optimize for Search Engines

Optimize your product descriptions for Google Search Including specific keywords in your product descriptions can help improve your search engine optimization (SEO). This will ultimately increase your chances of ranking high on the search results page. If you want to draft a conversion-oriented copy, make sure to do a little bit of keyword research to find out what the customers are searching for. Once you have found suitable keywords, integrate them and their variations into your content. The SEO best practices suggest placing keywords in the page titles, Meta descriptions, and image tags.  For good measure, include the main keyword at the top and bottom of your page to ensure your customers can easily find your product. It is also worth mentioning that your content should not be stuffed with keywords, as it may make your product description look unauthentic. The goal of optimizing your product description is to help gain new customers. Adding relevant keywords will allow prospective buyers to discover your brand and learn about its values with a few simple clicks on their device. Furthermore, adding relevant tags to product images also carries a lot of weight with search engines, which takes us to our next tip on how to write a product description that compels customers.

8. Always Use Quality Images

As the wise adage goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. If you want to master the art of writing excellent product descriptions, you cannot compromise on the quality of images. As mentioned above, customers cannot physically see or touch your product. While your words can help them envision how the product may look or feel, adding a good image along with your text can actually encourage them to buy it. It is one of the essential parts of a powerful product description. Most high-end brands hire professionals to create stunning photos and videos that capture all the best features of their products. However, spending precious resources on such services may not be feasible for new startups and small businesses. Instead of focusing too much on what your competitors are doing, divert your energy to take a few quality photos that enhance your product and effectively display its unique specifications. As long as your image is large, clear, and in line with the overall theme of your brand, there is a good chance that it will manage to convert readers into buyers. The accompanying copy should also create imagery that entices the customer into imagining what it would be like to hold or use the product.

What a short video regarding product description importance

Our Final Thoughts

Those were our best tips on how to write a product description that compels potential customers to make a purchase. If you are an entrepreneur or a small business owner looking to create brand awareness and improve your conversion rate, our team of content writers is ever-ready to help. To find out more about our services, contact us today. [post_title] => How to Write Compelling Product Descriptions that Convert [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-compelling-product-descriptions-that-convert [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:37:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:37:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2622 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2616 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content] => Bio Writing We’ve all had to be introspective at some point, especially when you’re looking to put yourself out there through a professional bio. You’ve likely thought about who you are or what qualities you embody. You’ve thought about your achievements.  Thinking to yourself is one thing, though, and writing it down for an external audience is entirely another. On the surface, it should be fairly simple. It’s a short paragraph or two describing your professional journey so far and where you intend to take it. But then why do so many people struggle to write a bio that adequately captures who they are? We’ve put together a checklist of the things that combine to make a great bio. To start off:

Start Strong

In many ways, the most important part of your blog is the opening section. A strong introduction not only reels your readers in, it can also serve to highlight the strongest aspects of your repertoire. Those first few lines need to be absolutely spot on to prompt the person reading to continue, so don’t skimp on your trial and error. Try out as many opening lines as you can think of if you feel like your current iteration could be better. Be confident, be honest, and don’t hesitate to strut your stuff. The opening lines are all about making an impact, and there’s a variety of ways to do this. You can open with humour, you can open with an achievement that speaks for itself, or you can open with a reference. There’s room to experiment, so there’s no excuse for trying as hard as you can to think of what fits your bio best.

Be Partial Towards Recent Developments, but Don’t Hesitate to Discuss How Got You Here

Like a resume, the more current your bio is, the better. Make sure you include a sentence or two that tells people, at least vaguely, about where you are now and what you’re doing. It lets prospective interests know what you’re doing these days and whether your skillset is relevant to them. While you might be tempted to list events in order of recency, don’t do that. Not every post is important, and not every move significant. Instead, if there’s a turning point in your professional development, such as a time when you switched fields three years ago, you’re better off addressing that. It’s not as if you’ve got room to be long-winded, but you should still discuss what prompted the switch, so long as you were positively motivated. You can sneak in a line or two about how your prior experience empowers you in your current line of work as well.

Decide on a Tone and Keep It Consistent

A bio is a concise description and one that sees many iterations as your career evolves and your professional development progresses. If you’re used to cutting out and adding in individual lines (and even if you’re not), it’s good to give the whole thing a read over to see if you’re consistent. While the right tone for you will depend entirely on what career you’re in and how you’re most comfortable expressing yourself, there are certain pointers. You shouldn’t be arrogant or overly informal; it’s much better to phrase your brags as subtly as possible and maintain a polite disposition. Achievements are more effective when mildly understated than they are when blown out of proportion, so make sure you maintain a humble tone. Humor isn’t necessarily off the cards, but you have to balance it out with serious statements. Also, your best bet is tongue-in-cheek humor rather than something that might risk offending someone; remember, this is a professional piece. Consistency also extends to whether or not you’re writing in first-person. Don’t go from I to they (first to third-person), or skip the pronoun altogether (implied the first person). This of course is easier said than done, and if it’s not for you – there is no shame in hiring professional bio writers instead.

Don’t Forget to Inject some Personality into Your Writing

personality in your bio One of the most typical mistakes when writing a bio is being too formulaic in your approach. You find something that really works, so you copy the same structure or type out the entire thing in as neutral a tone as possible. Nothing which worked for someone else needs to work just as well for you. Your Bio should be like your fingerprint, abstractly similar but entirely unique in itself. You have an entire lifetime of experiences at your disposal, so be sure to showcase as much of them as you can, as positively as you can. Your writing conveys not only your experiences but also aspects of your outlook and who you are. You shouldn’t shy away from including stuff about your innermost goals and motivations to the extent that you’re comfortable. While you shouldn’t be too flowery in your use of language, don’t be afraid to use more complicated terms where there is merit to them.

Always Double Check Guidelines

The platform or portal you’re submitting your bio to might have specific guidelines for what’s considered a valid submission. Always make sure that you check all the boxes and that you haven’t included anything that they’ve disallowed. This also means that you won’t be able to submit the same exact bio to every single prospect, but that should be standard practice as it is. Make sure you tailor your bio to the sort of opportunity you’re on the hunt for to give yourself the best possible chances.

Be Concise

Top the point writing We’ve already discussed how you shouldn’t pad your bio, but there’s more to a good bio than just keeping things simple. Your bio is meant to be a rich summary of your recent professional experiences, but you don’t need to mention every single thing you’ve already mentioned with your resume. This brings us to another point: you should try to keep repetition between your bio and your resume to a minimum. That’s not to say there should be no overlap at all, but rather, that your bio should only further explore the most important parts of your resume, the parts you want a potential employer to focus on. By emphasizing those tenures, you can draw attention to aspects of your development that may not have been adequately represented as just another bullet point in your CV or LinkedIn profile.

Don’t List Your Achievements

Recall what we said about trying to keep yourself sounding as down to earth as possible. If your bio reads like a list of things you’ve accomplished, you’re not doing it right. Instead of leading every statement with what you are or what you’ve achieved, try to pivot to what you have to offer someone you’d want to establish a professional relationship with. Instead of talking about your skills and how you’ve acquired them, talk about what those skills can accomplish for someone working with you. People want to see what value you bring to the table, so making your bio about what you have to give, rather than just what you have, is a great strategy to employ.

Add a Personal Touch

We’ve already discussed the importance of abandoning the formulaic approach, but a great bio goes further than that. A bio should demonstrate more than just professional experience; it’s a representation of who you are. As such, you can’t expect to paint a clear picture of yourself by talking about your career alone; you can and should include references to personal triumphs and milestones. We’re obviously not talking about detailed narrations (you don’t have the words to spare, nor that much creative license), but you can definitely include distilled versions of them. Simply mentioning that you’re an aquaphobe learning how to swim, for example, can tell your employer plenty about the fact that you take adversity on the chin and that you have a mind to surmount obstacles. Personal touches like these help highlight crucial aspects of your personality that might help distinguish you from other applicants, so it’s a good idea to include something about your life. Another way you could benefit from a personal addition is to use it to demonstrate your more personable traits. This could be through humor, or a line or two about your charitable pursuits, or just what you enjoy doing in your free time. Either way, it helps paint you as more than just a robot with work experience, so be sure to make the most of it.

Maintain a Balance

So you’ve got to include aspects of your personality, personal pursuits, career progression, and current state of employment. While adequately covering all of those focus areas, you also have to flow so that your bio doesn’t read like a series of disconnected statements. And you have to keep to a very strict word count while doing all of the above. This can prove daunting, even for the best of us, and that’s why bio writing is more art than science. It’s also why revising your bio is a very tedious process that can involve hours of brainstorming with very little to show for it.

Watch a short video to learn more about What is a Biography

Bio Writers to Make Your Look Like a Million Bucks

If you’ve been having trouble with figuring out just the right words to put in your bio, or you’re second-guessing what your bio should look like – our team of Professional Bio Writers can help. From techies to published authors, finance execs to teachers – our versatile team of bio writers understands what every bio needs and delivers. [post_title] => How to Write the Perfect Professional Bio [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-the-perfect-professional-bio [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2616 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2608 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-15 06:51:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:51:31 [post_content] => writing SEO friendly content Search engine optimization, or SEO, as it may be known to most of you, is a rapidly evolving discipline that has been on the rise ever since Google took the world of search engines by storm. Accoridngly, learning how to write SEO-firendly articles is number one on the checklist of content producers that want to ace SERPs.

Keep Up-to-date with Google

Last year, Google announced the addition of core web vitals and page experience signals as ranking factors in search results. We won't get into too much detail about what these are specifically just yet, but you should know that your core web vitals tell Google how quickly and smoothly a page loads in front of a user. The other page experience signals are, more or less, boxes you need to check regarding the security of your connection with your users, and that they're being delivered a quality experience that isn't overly annoying or outdated. All we mean to do with the above is highlight that the field of search engine optimization is constantly evolving. With Google needing to constantly roll out updates to combat people finding shortcuts to ranking better (such as black hat backlinking practices) or breaking ranking factors altogether and using them for gaming the system (such as keyword cramming). While Google does come out with its SEO guidelines to help people understand how they can improve their website and put out content in a way that helps them rank better, what Google does not do is tell you exactly how searches are ranked and how much each individual metric contributes to your overall ranking. For all of these reasons and others, keeping up with all of the advancements taking place within the field of SEO can be a difficult task, even for those of us that call SEO their bread and butter.

Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content

If you've tried learning how to do your own SEO before, and you found the process to be too tedious or difficult, then this article is for you. Not only will we go over exactly how you can go about making your content SEO friendly, we'll also let you know key tips and tools you can use to help you with the process.

Tip 1: Select the right topics to write about

A great way to make a splash on those Search Engine Ranking Pages (SERPs) is to select topics that are currently garnering interest amongst the public. Even if your website or business's actual domain area isn't the most popular, get creative and find ways to link it to those popular topics. Remember, even the best-written content won't garner views if you're writing about something that no one wants to read about. This is where learning how to use Google Trends for SEO could be beneficial. Content marketing strategies are great and all, but you'd have to be a magician to get people to read an article they have no interest in. If you're worried that focusing on topics of interest will have you competing with industry giants for rankings, don't be. Remember, recency is also a factor in search results ranking, so simply the fact that you're posting your stuff today is going to get you at least some preferential treatment. And if your stuff is original and out of the box, providing a fresh perspective or some expertise that can't be found elsewhere, that's going to push you up even further. Besides, you shouldn't be worried about the competition anyways; SERPs are full of examples of Davids who counter Industry Goliaths, and the next one might just be you. As long as you can focus on providing quality experience to your users (and do so consistently), it'll always shine through sooner or later. Of course, this is where our article writing service can give you the leg up.

Tip 2: Keyword research is still paramount (and probably will continue to be for at least a while)

SEO-friendly content needs strong keyword research There's one aspect of SEO that hasn't changed much over the years: Using high-interest keywords still helps you rise to the top of rank results. You should make it a routine practice to check out keyword rankings relating to your topic area, once before you've written your piece and once after it's done, right before you publish. Why before you publish? To make sure you haven't overused your keyword or used too many keywords in your text. A piece that's 500 words long shouldn't try to target ten different keywords, and it shouldn't contain fifteen instances of your primary keyword. Black hat hacks like these were popular during the early years of SEO, but Google's done plenty to prevent them from being viable today. Don't fall victim to your own bad practices. For a standard guideline regarding how many instances of a particular keyword should be in an article:
  • Keep yourself to two to three instances at most for a 500-word article
  • Add one for each additional 500 words when it comes to longer articles.
According to this directive, a 2000 word piece should contain six instances of a particular keyword. Naturally, if your keyword is a generic term, you might find yourself using it a bit more, and that's okay, but try to avoid being too repetitive with it. Try for synonyms or abbreviations, anything you can do to avoid making it seem like you've crammed; if you can tell, chances are Google can too. Aside from this, try to be as strategic as you can with your keyword use. Don't rush to put out a piece relating to each popular search term you can find that's relevant to your business. There's such a thing as Keyword Cannibalization; it's where your own articles are competing with one another for the same keyword and actually taking traffic away from one another. We're sure we don't need to spell it out for you, but this isn't a good thing. When it comes to terms that are highly relevant to your website, try to put out long-form content that covers as many aspects of the term as you can, rather than rushing to release content relating to every term people could possibly search for. Be strategic with your content; it will pay dividends in the long run. Oh, and speaking of being strategic…

Tip 3: Plan out an approach to content that lets you make the most of different types of articles

Google and other search engines tend to love websites that are regularly updated. This means releasing daily content for many website owners, even if that content is just a rehashed version of an article they'd put out the previous week. This might work for some people, but it certainly isn't a surefire way to succeed with your content. If you're going to have to repeat yourself eventually, and you know it, you should plan out your topics so that you maximize the amount of time there is between two similar articles. You can use the time in between to figure out how you can cover the same topic or domain area from a different perspective.

Struggling for Ideas? Well, that’s what professionals are for. Our diverse team of content writers are not only well-versed with creating compelling and unique content – but at scale.

Another way to keep things fresh is to cover topical, time-sensitive developments within your focus area. For example, you can write a long-form cornerstone article on content writing best practices, and that article can remain the same for a long while. Instead of writing about that topic again, you can later release content about how opinion pieces are the way to go in 2021 and fill that article with reasons for why perspective based content is especially relevant after we've all experienced a lockdown that cut us off from being exposed to other opinions. While opinion pieces don't inspire the sort of trust that a faultless factual piece might, they're excellent for increasing engagement and getting people talking in your comments section. There's no real substitute for user engagement and no second-guessing the fact that search engines are partial towards content that engages readers, so why not experiment a bit and get creative. And creativity doesn't just have to do with how and what you write about.

Tip 4: Use every channel (and platform) at your disposal to make people aware of the content you're publishing

social media like facebook is key for SEO content Social Media is a great way to get more eyes on your content. If an article on your site isn't getting the traction you'd want it to, posting a link to the article on your business's Facebook page along with a captivating tagline or quote from the article might be just the thing to get those numbers up to desirable levels. More clicks mean more views, and more views mean preferential treatment within search results, so don't be shy about plugging your content wherever you can. There was a time when businesses just needed to have a listing in the Yellow Pages, but that time has long since passed. Now businesses are everywhere, from Facebook and Instagram to Twitter and LinkedIn. There's no reason your business shouldn't have a face on each and every one of these platforms. If you pay enough attention to what works on each of them, you might just find that one, in particular, is extremely conducive to the type of content you're putting out and gets you more traffic than the rest of them. Once you know this, you can start focusing more on generating more content for that platform and using that content to generate more traffic for your e-commerce website or storefront. A content writing service can be your saving grace here. Getting people to your content isn't everything though, you've also got to think about where people are going from your articles…

Tip 5: Make sure you put the right links in your content (and the right type of links as well)

Everyone knows not to link to their competitors. But if you've been in the content game as long as we have, you might also know that you can't just back up your own content with any material you can find that supports your claims. There's a LOT of repetition on the Internet. You can Google any topic and find twenty different articles all saying the same thing using slightly different words. You might think that linking to any one of them serves the purposes you need for your articles, but that just isn't true. So what then, do you link to the best written of those articles? Not always. Informational content, such as the stuff you'd find on a .edu or .gov site. .Org sites are good, too, as long as the article you're linking to isn't trying to sell something itself. SEO-friendly content is written with the intent to inform and it always tends to rank better and contribute more to the credibility of what you're saying than content that has an ulterior motive. Keep that in mind while you're selecting which articles to link to. Credible links get your website more "Authority". Authority is a holistic metric that determines how much clout you have within your domain or focus area. Quality internal links also help you gain authority since users can jump from article to article within your site without finding redundant or otherwise fruitless content. But if you're too liberal with your external links (i.e. links that lead out of your site) you can end up losing authority to the pages you link to. This isn't always a bad thing, but you should try to use "no follow" links for at least some of your outbound links for this reason. No-follow links prevent crawlers from passing authority along from your site to the site you're linking to.

SEO-Friendly Content by Experts

If you've enjoyed this list of SEO-friendly practices to help your website take off, consider reaching out to us to find out more about what we can do to help revamp your content portfolio. We've got years of experience in the industry and a long list of satisfied clientele to back us up, so why not give us a call. [post_title] => Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content to Gain Visibility on Search Engines [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => tips-for-writing-seo-friendly-content [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-15 06:53:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:53:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2608 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2598 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-08 08:17:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-08 12:17:26 [post_content] => Hire professional transcribers Speech recognition has come a long way and has been one of the leading developments in reach towards the Internet of Things. Now, with Google Home and Amazon’s Alexa, we can control just about any aspect of room ambience without moving an inch. While services like these might lead you to believe that speech recognition has evolved to the point where human transcription just doesn’t make sense anymore, we’re still far from being there yet. We’re not saying that speech recognition hasn’t grown by leaps and bounds in the past decade or so, far from it, in fact, it’s just that it’s not quite gotten to the point where it can be considered as reliable as the human mind. In other words, if you want accurate transcriptions where context, punctuation and accents are accounted for, going for a transcription writing service is your best bet. Before we can explore a comparison between these two methods, let us take a look at what both are:

Hiring Professional Transcribers Over Speech Recognition

Manual transcription is fairly straightforward. A person listens to an audio recording and jots down the contents; there isn’t much to explain there. To understand why human beings are better at this task, we must first understand how we interpret language. The human mind is a multi-track processor. This means that it can selectively and intuitively utilize multiple processes towards the same end, switching freely between those processes as the need arises. The most powerful tool we have at our disposal when it comes to understanding speech is the flexible use of context. We can glean details about the subject conversation like several speakers, roles in the conversation, subject matter, and key points, just from listening to the conversation for a small amount of time. Even if there are noisier sections, we can pause, rewind, and play again until we arrive at a reasonable guess for what is being said. If that doesn’t work, we can continue further along in the conversation and figure out what might have gone in a particular section through later references.

How Accurate is Speech Recognition

ASR, or Automated Speech Recognition, is the domain of computer science and technological research that deals with getting computers to understand the spoken word. In an ideal scenario, where you’re dealing with clean (noiseless), high fidelity audio, a computer can indeed measure up to human standards and even compete with top-notch transcribers. Just so you can compare, the human error rate during audio transcription is about four percent, while these artificial intelligence-based technologies usually hover around the five percent mark. That means that they’re almost as good if only slightly worse, than humans at transcribing audio. The ball game shifts a bit when we talk about LVCSR (Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition). These applications are categorized by an extremely large vocabulary of words and fluid conversation between multiple speakers. When it comes to these scenarios, the error rate for humans is still at roughly four to five percent, while their technological counterpart measures in at roughly 8 – 10 percent. An accuracy rate of 10 percent means an error every 10 words, which is far beyond the acceptable amount. But real-world applications are much, much worse. Say you have a phone call or a voice note you’d like transcribed. The background noise can make certain words hard for the speech recognition software to detect, but that’s to be expected. In computer science terms, when you use the word “noise” you’re actually describing different elements that obscure the quality of a particular frame (in the case of audio and video). Noise can come from various sources and increases as you increase volume and distance from the audio capture device. But noise isn’t just an environmental factor, at least not in traditional terms. You see, when we communicate over telephone lines, the audio signal generated by our voices is actually converted to an electrical signal, which travels across large distances and is then converted back into audio for us to hear. These conversions minimize line loss and maximize distance, allowing us to make phone calls across the world. However, “minimize” is a relative term here; while we can hear and understand a person speaking on a phone call, a computer might not be able to do the same. There are certain aspects of speech recognition that computers truly excel at. They’re many magnitudes of times faster, and as such, some programs can sift through hundreds of hours of audio in the time, it would take a human being to complete working on a one-hour transcription. However, to mimic a process as complex as understanding human speech, a computer must break it down into individual tasks. Preprocessing, feature extraction, acoustic modelling, language modelling, and decoding are all individual steps in a process designed to achieve the same results as human listening, but that doesn’t mean that both work in the same way.

Why Hiring a Transcription Service is the Better Option

This fluid use of context and a wider understanding of the way objects are related in the world gives human transcribers an edge over conventional computer-based means. Again, even the most advanced neural networks only attempt to mimic our faculty of working with context, and this mimicry is subject to our own understanding of how our mind works, which is admittedly limited. Systems designed by us to do something our minds do, when we ourselves only have a rudimentary understanding of the internal workings of the human mind, cannot reach the level of accuracy that a professional who has listened to thousands of hours of audio can offer us. Meanwhile, a computer application will break the process down into multiple simple steps, and by the end of all these processes, arrive at a transcription. While we did mention each of the steps that a hypothetical speech recognition tool could take to recognize patterns in speech, knowing what each of these means isn’t necessary for the purposes of this article. You need to know that certain aspects of spoken language don’t necessarily translate very well to the machine equivalent of the listening process. The main issues are as follows:

Punctuation

It can be difficult to determine how to punctuate a sentence heard over the phone or out of context, even for human transcriptionists. However, because we have a wider understanding of linguistic rules to work with, we can easily make educated guesses about where to put commas, periods, and semicolons and where to swap out a period for an exclamation mark, for example. A computer, meanwhile, can only attempt a verbatim transcription, which completely ignores punctuation within a sentence most of the time. What you’re left with is a mess of words separated by no more than a few sparse periods.

Filler Words and Offhand Sounds

These areother aspects of transcription that software fails to reliably account for. Filler words are commonly used unintentionally during the fluid speech, with the most easily explainable reason for their presence being a person struggling to reach for their next word. A program will not be able to distinguish that a person saying “what’s the word?” is actually trying to recall a word they can’t remember and will instead transcribe that phrase along with what was said previously. It sounds like “oh”s and “ah”s are just as difficult for computers to ignore, and they can make many initial drafts seem like gibberish to the intelligent reader. Characteristics of speech like a lisp or a stutter are no different from filler words and sounds. In fact, if anything, these are much worse, as they can affect even words the software would normally detect. Tweaking the software to work with these difficulties is often a very complicated process if it’s possible at all, and it might render the software incapable of recognizing normal speech.

Dialect, accents, and other intangible aspects of speech

While it may not have as much bearing on how a particular language is expressed in writing, locality does greatly affect the way we speak any given language. Differences in pronunciation and enunciation between two people within the same locality are often difficult, if not impossible, to account for, so a person speaking in a different dialect may as well be speaking a different language altogether. Creating software or training an AI agent to understand multiple dialects of the same language is harder than you might think. On some level, the software must determine which particular dialect is being spoken during the feature extraction process. The difficulty of this task is compounded when you have multiple speakers, especially speakers from diverse cultural backgrounds.

The need for edited transcriptions

Edited transcriptions are one possible solution to some of the problems relating to each of the previous aspects of translation. Instead of the verbatim transcription that software generates being the final product, a service provider will often offer some “post-processing” work, in the form of a human being going over the verbatim transcript and fixing minor errors, removing redundancies and filler, and generally improving its readability (by replacing incorrect homophones, for example). Since this involves essentially hiring a person to proofread a computer-generated translation, it eliminates the “automated” aspect of the process. Instead of using human effort to counter the weaknesses of a computer system (and still arrive at a final product that doesn’t meet the same standards as a professional transcription), why not replace the software application with human effort entirely? This is not to say that software-generated recordings don’t have their own audience. For some purposes, such as voicemail recordings and general surveillance, automated speech recognition makes perfect sense. In these cases, minor transcription errors can be overlooked in light of the cost-saving that ASR offers. This is also ASR’s greatest saving grace for applications where the volume of incoming data is far too high for a human transcription to be viable. In cases where high volumes and time-sensitivity factors are considered, edited documents offer the greatest compromise between ASR (which wouldn’t be accurate enough on its own) and professional transcription (which wouldn’t be as cost-effective. For more sensitive applications, especially those in which the contents of a recording are of critical value or where the quality of recordings is inconsistent or cannot be guaranteed, a professionally transcribed document always manages to edge out a computer-generated one.

Hiring Professional Transcribers Vs. Speech Software

As research into natural language processing and speech recognition applications begin to bear greater fruit, we may eventually arrive at a focal point where computer-generated transcriptions are virtually indistinguishable from professionally transcribed ones. We’re definitely not there yet, though, and given the breadth of problems that computer scientists must tackle to achieve this, it’s safe to say we won’t be there any time soon. While software may achieve great results for extremely specialized applications, a general-use speech recognition software that can reliably get the job done, regardless of the scope of the task, simply doesn’t exist right now. That’s why we’d suggest that you always opt for professional transcription service over an automatically generated one, especially if you’re invested in maintaining the quality of your final product. Get in touch and let’s get your transcription project off the blocks right away. [post_title] => Why Hire Professional Transcribers Instead of Using Transcription Software [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => why-hire-professional-transcribers-instead-of-using-transcription-software [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-02 08:20:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-02 12:20:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2598 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2593 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-03 08:12:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-03 12:12:29 [post_content] => Eulogy speech writing Bereavement can be one of the most difficult aspects of life to cope with. Loved ones inevitably pass on, but writing a eulogy speech that does justice to the loss you feel is one of the hardest things you’ll ever have to do. If you (or someone you know) have lost someone recently, then you’ll know the feeling of disbelief that comes with such an event. That, and the whirlwind of emotions that goes along with it, is enough to deal with on its own. Yet with every passing, those left behind are entrusted with one fundamental task by the recently deceased: to live on. The first step towards a continued life is to put those who are gone to rest.

Eulogy Speeches – Reminding Ourselves that We Grieve Together

For the sake of formality, let us start by taking a look at the definition of a eulogy. A eulogy is a speech given during a funeral as a tribute to the recently deceased – one that recounts moments shared with them, as well as bits and pieces of what you’ll remember them most fondly for. It’s considered an honor to be asked to give a eulogy for someone you knew, as it tends to show just how great a part you played in their lives, and how great a part they played in yours. A eulogy can present itself as a very tricky task, especially given the breadth of what it aims to achieve, as well as the gravity of the situation. You’re not just saying good bye to someone who was a close companion in one way or another, you’re also addressing a gathering of people who are similarly bereaved and grieving with you. When you speak, you are speaking as the singular voice that ushers that lost loved one to the great beyond – your words forming the ending note in the final chapter of their lives. You speak on the behalf of everyone who grieves with you, and sometimes on the behalf of the deceased themselves. The aim is to say good bye in a way that respects the time you spent together, and steels everyone in preparation for times to come. Naturally, this is quite the responsibility, and most of the time, the person taking it on is one of the people who are most affected by the loss. Most people will not give many eulogies over the course of their lives, which means advice (at least advice that is based on experience) will be hard to come by, and undoubtedly very difficult to ask for. Moreover, every person is different, meaning every eulogy is different, and different people will approach the task in very unique ways. There are some key considerations, however, that remain common throughout parting addresses, and knowing these can help you figure out how you want to word and deliver your own piece. To start off…

Tips for Writing a Touching Eulogy Speech

We mentioned this in passing earlier, but it deserves an explicit mention: There’s no such thing as a clinical approach to eulogy writing. You can seek inspiration wherever you might find it, but always remember that the person you’re writing about, and the assembly you’re speaking to, are both entirely unique to your situation. As such, adopting a formulaic approach to speech writing can take away from the essence of what a eulogy aims to achieve. You want your eulogy to be guided by a respect for your feelings, and the feelings of the people you’re addressing; and not by a desire to check the boxes for what makes a complete speech.

1.    Remember to Talk to Other People Who Were Close to the Deceased

This is also critical, and applies even more so when you’ve been asked to deliver the eulogy by someone who, in your mind, was closer to the deceased than even you. You should make sure that your address is not focused exclusively on moments you shared with the dearly departed, without giving room for other people in the assembly to connect to it. Remember, the purpose of a eulogy is twofold – you’re honoring a lost loved one and acknowledging their loss, while also attempting to make the process of bearing that loss easier on those around you. Make sure your own stories are interspersed with mentions of other people who are present, if not their stories as well. Being included in the process of informing your eulogy helps people feel less isolated in their grief, which in turn makes grieving a less difficult ordeal. Also, while you had your own unique connection to the deceased, so did many of those around you at the time you’re delivering your address; it’s important that you acknowledge those connections when you’re speaking to everyone.

2.    Decide on a Structure for Your Funeral Speech

There’re two basic approaches to how you can structure a eulogy, you can either follow a chronology, or a mood board.

Chronology-based eulogy

It will focus on outlining a timeline of events in the deceased’s life, from when and where they were born to the circumstances of their eventual passing. A life is a very long ordeal to sum up in just a few minutes though, so write down significant events you want to mention before you actually write your piece so that you don’t forget to mention something that shouldn’t have been omitted. Significant events can be anything including a marriage or a fateful encounter with a significant other, the birth of a child, service in the military, etc. Once you’ve written your speech around these events, you can include a brief paragraph that summarizes the different ways in which the deceased managed to enrich the lives of those around them.

Mood boards

These are slightly different. Instead of focusing on a series of events in chronological order, you group anecdotes or significant encounters into different segments depending on how they’d make the audience feel. The passing of a loved one is a decidedly somber and sorrowful occasion, but that doesn’t mean the tone of your eulogy has to be exclusively depressing throughout. For example, you could start with a note about the many hardships the person in question faced throughout their lives (sorrowful), and transition to how they managed to surmount all of those hardships (uplifting), and end on a comment about how the departed taught us to strive to achieve great things even in the face of overwhelming opposition (hopeful). If a particular negative section goes on a little too long, you could include a light-hearted anecdote or comment, especially if it is one that’s easy to associate with the memory of the deceased. Structuring your eulogy this way helps you find ways to incorporate elements of relief (such as humor) while still keeping the overall tone respectful, though it does require you to leverage your writing and speaking skills a bit more than a chronology. Speaking of which…

What Do You Say in a Eulogy - Pick Your Words Carefully

Keep in mind that the speech you’re writing is meant to be delivered at a funeral. Most of the time, that means no overly verbose phrases or flowery language, but you’ll know your own situation best. Keeping things as simple and colloquial as possible is usually a good thing; you want to think of the eulogy as a sort of monologue in a conversation between you and the assembly. However, it’s important to avoid getting too casual with your speech as well, at the risk of sounding crass or inconsiderate. Remember that there are others in the audience who’re facing this with you, and don’t say anything that might potentially offend someone’s sensibilities or cause them pain. This applies especially to the inclusion of humorous anecdotes; while these can provide some much-needed levity, they’re also just as likely to rub people the wrong way when executed poorly or inappropriately. Another aspect to “picking your words” is including bits and pieces of common and repeated phrases that people might’ve heard from the deceased. These can help lend emotional gravity to your writing, and make it easier for the assembly to connect to what you’re saying.

Make Sure Your Address Is Appropriate for your Station

A husband or wife delivering a eulogy in honor of their partner, or a child mourning a parent, can speak about just about any subject matter so long as they phrase it appropriately. However, these people may not always feel up to the task of delivering a speech, and may ask someone to step in for them. In cases like these, it is important to respect the difference in standing between the person delivering the speech and the person who asked them to deliver it. The same way, if you’ve been tasked with delivering a eulogy for a friend while their family are in attendance, it’s important that you don’t overstep and say things that upset the family.

Maintain a Positive Disposition (or as much of one as you can)

Once again, the passing of a loved one is a decidedly undesirable event. There’s no two ways to put it, and no way to spin it into a silver lining, that’s just how grief works. Always keep in mind that your eulogy’s main purpose is to help soothe the pain that the most important members of the assembly are feeling. This is why you should be extra mindful of these people and what they need to hear from you, both when you’re writing the eulogy and delivering it. With speech writing, it’s a matter of picking the exact right words and putting them in exactly the right place, while when speaking, it’s a matter of how you deliver those words. Especially when you’re covering subject matter that’s on the heavier side of things, you should be aware of the people around you and how your words are making them feel. Taking a moment to pause to collect yourself, or to give someone a kind look and a nod of reassurance, can go a long way towards helping them remain strong. Beyond this, it’s important to balance out the heavier, longer parts of your speech by having briefer, lighter anecdotes in between them. This helps make the speech less emotionally draining as a whole, both for you as a speaker, and everyone present in the assembly.

Don’t Feel Pressured

This applies especially to people who aren’t used to giving addresses, especially during difficult times. You might find yourself getting crushed under the weight of the immense responsibility that’s been placed on you. Nobody’s a “pro” at delivering eulogies, and even if experience were abundant (which it isn’t), no amount of practice can help prepare a person for events when they lose someone important to them.So if you find yourself getting emotional while writing your speech, or you feel like you can’t do justice to the task, be sure to remind yourself that you’re grieving too, and that nothing takes precedent over that. Focus on your emotions regarding the deceased, and try to use those emotions as the basis for your speech rather than adherence to a guide. Don’t try to seek out the perfect words, that’s not what a eulogy is for, and it could take you more time to find these words than you have on hand.

Eulogy Speech Writing Services Can Help Put Your Emotions into Words

We understand that grief is a slow, arduous process, and one that can’t be rushed. If you’re having a rough go at things in the wake of someone’s passing, we can help you find the right words, or at least a worthwhile substitute.

If you’d like to know more about our speech writing services, please give us a call at 1-877-897-1725 or start chatting with our representative today.

[post_title] => Writing a Touching Eulogy Speech for the Perfect Good Bye [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-a-touching-eulogy-speech-for-the-perfect-good-bye [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-08 07:07:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-08 11:07:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2593 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 10 [current_post] => 3 [in_the_loop] => 1 [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2636 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-14 08:50:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-14 12:50:30 [post_content] => Title capitalization There are varying and often confusing rules to the use of the English language and none so much as title capitalization. With a language that's so pervasive and commonly used, you're bound to find different schools of thought that define the rules in their own way. When it comes to print media and even forms of online written content, the rules can get even more difficult to ascertain. Specifically, when you talk about writing an article, book or even a social media post – thes rules can get very detailed and all the more elusive. There is an abundance of different style guides out there, and even veteran writers can find themselves making mistakes every now and again. If you've found yourself stumped on your journey towards creating exceptional online content, this guide is for you.

Simple Rules for Title Capitalization

Before we can get into the exact nuances that matter with each style, let's look at the things that most styles have in common. To start off…

Always Capitalize the First and Last Words

Let's start with a fairly straightforward rule. Always capitalize the first and last word of your title, regardless of what those words are. For example: Incorrect: "tips to capitalizing titles" Correct: "Tips to Capitalizing Titles"

Always Capitalize oYur Nouns

While the jury might be out on other parts of speech, all of your mainstream style guides agree that nouns are of great importance in a title. A noun is defined as a word that identifies a class of objectsor a specific instance of that class, where the object in question can be any place, animal, or thing (real or abstract). Common nouns deal with class identifiers, while proper nouns deal with instances. Consider the following sentence: "Hello, my name is Jim." Now it's easy to tell that the word "Jim" carries importance here since it contributes heavily to the sentences communicated. So is the word "name", since it determines what the word "Jim" defines. In this case, "Jim" is an example of a proper noun, while "name" is a common noun, and when you're writing in prose or paragraphs, the rules state that you're only supposed to capitalize proper nouns, while common nouns are left in lower case unless they're starting off a sentence. Titles, however, are different. If there was a title in our sentence, the word "name" would also be capitalized, regardless of whichever style you're using. Pronouns are the same; you shouldn't write words like "I", "You", "We", or "Us" without capitalizing them. Common and proper nouns are both categories of principle words, as are pronouns, so you shouldn't usually leave them in the lowercase. So, in this case, our final statement becomes: "Hello, my Name is Jim" We're gradually getting closer to a statement that would function perfectly as a title, but we're not yet there. Next up…

Always Capitalize Your Verbs, Adverbs, and Adjectives

Words like "my" and "your" can be confusing since they function as different types of speech depending on how they're used. Technically speaking, they're attributive adjectives or adverbs denoting possession. This means that they commute the ownership attributed through a pronoun to a common noun or verb. If "I have a car", then that car, by definition, is "my car". The English language doesn't require you to capitalize your possession bearing adjectives and adverbs while writing sentences, but titles are different once again. All styles, including the APA (American Psychological Association), MLA (Modern Language Association), CMOS (Chicago Manual Of Style, at times, shortened to CMS), and AP (Associated Press) styles require you to capitalize all of your adverbs and adjectives, regardless of their position in a title. So going back to our initial statement, we had: "Hello, my Name is Jim" This now becomes: "Hello, My Name is Jim" Which is our finalized version of the title.

Always Leave Your Articles in Lower Case

Articles are words such as the, a, and an, which tell you whether you're referring to a general or specific object (i.e.the calculator refers to a specific calculator vs. a calculator, which is used to make general statements about calculators). As a rule of thumb, it's good to keep in mind that all articles are left in lower case unless they start or end your title.

The Tricky Part of Capitalizing Your title

Now that we've covered the broad strokes version of what to capitalize and what to leave in lower case let's look at parts of speech that have more intricacies involved.

Prepositions

The first area of contention, which most people tend to have trouble with, is prepositions. Prepositions are words that are usually used before pronouns and other nouns to define relations between objects. So when you say someone "arrived after dinner", or that "they were resting inside the room", the words after and inside are actually examples of prepositions. Other examples of prepositions include in, with, within, without, besides, among, around, above, below, across, against, and many more. Different schools of thought have differing opinions regarding what to capitalize and what to leave in regular case in a title when it comes to prepositions.

APA Citation

Regarding the APA citation style, you're only supposed to capitalize your longer prepositions (four letters or more) while leaving shorter ones in lower case. So when you're dealing with examples such as "A Walk Through the Meadow" you have to capitalize the word "Through", even though it's a preposition and it isn't situated at the beginning or end of your title. However, if you're using a shorter preposition, such as in the case of "A Walk in the Park", the preposition is written in lower case.

AP Stylebook

The Associated Press Stylebook is similar in that you only capitalize longer prepositions.

Chicago Manual of Style

The Chicago Manual of Style is slightly more difficult to deal with regarding what you should and shouldn't capitalize. The general rule is that you should never capitalize any prepositions or conjunctions unless:
  • They're used adverbially or adjectivally
  • They're used as conjunctions
  • They call for emphasis or are stressed upon
The first two rules are fairly direct and leave little room for the imagination. If you're saying"My Clothes are Soaked Through" or "Think It Through", you're using the word ‘through’ as an adverb, and it needs to be left capitalized. Similar is the case above when we talk about "A Walk Through the Meadow". The word through is being used as an adjective in this example, so it'll be capitalized once again. The third rule is a little more ambivalent, so you've got room to be creative in the third scenario. After all, what you choose to emphasize or draw the reader's attention to is entirely up to you as the writer, so you can justify capitalizing prepositions in some cases where they play a critical role in defining the meaning of your title.

MLA Style

The last major style we've got to look at is the Modern Language Association style, most commonly used in liberal arts or humanities texts. MLA advises you to leave all your prepositions in lower case, except when they're being used as subordinating conjunctions. We'll cover the specifics of these in the next section. For now, it's best to just keep in mind that MLA doesn't have a word length requirement when it comes to capitalizing prepositions within your title; if you're dealing with a preposition, leave it in lower case.

Conjunctions

There are two kinds of conjunctions in the English Language: subordinating conjunctions and coordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions are words that join two individual statements of equal relevance and importance. Think of words like "and" and "or"; when you say you'll "have either breakfast or lunch", or when you say that you "intend to visit the barbershop and the tailor", the order in which you use the noun terms is usually unimportant. This is because coordinating conjunctions join together two statements of the same grammatical relevance. One statement isn't a precursor or a prerequisite to the other. Subordinating conjunctions like "before", "after", and "until" are different. If you say"I ate before dusk", it's not the same thing as saying "It was dusk before I ate". In fact, both statements have mutually exclusive meanings. One says that you ate your meal before a certain time, while the other says that a certain amount of time had passed before you got to eat. Both cannot be true together. This is the key difference between subordinating and coordinating conjunctions. Subordinating conjunctions combine two statements where one statement is somehow dependent upon the other, either to show one as a necessary consequence of the other or the exact opposite. There's a lot of overlap between prepositions and subordinating conjunctions, and there're plenty of words (like all three of our examples up there) that function as both conjunctions and prepositions. When it comes to the Associated Press Stylebook or the APA Style guide, you're supposed to never capitalize your conjunctions, regardless of the type, unless they're more than four letters long. When it comes to CMOS and MLA, you can only capitalize subordinating conjunctions but never coordinating conjunctions.

Compound Words

Compound or hyphenated words require some handling if you insert them into your titles, but they're just a few rules you need to be aware of. They're the same for the Chicago, APA, and MLA style guides, so you don't have to worry about remembering different rules for each. To start off, if the compound word consists of two separate individual words that carry meaning, you'll capitalize both. An example of this is "self-report", which would be written as "Self-Report" if part of a title. Secondly, if you're dealing with a hyphenated word that consists of a prefix and another word, you'll capitalize just the prefix and leave the actual word in lower case. So the word "anti-inflammatory" would be written as "Anti-inflammatory". The same also applies to words with a single letter attached as a prefix (such as t-shirt, which would be written as T-shirt). Finally, if you're dealing with a compound word that contains prepositions, articles, or coordinating conjunctions, you'll leave the preposition, article, or coordinating conjunction in lower case while capitalizing the rest of the word as outlined above. So a word such as "holier-than-thou" would be written as "Holier-than-Thou" within a title.

The Final Word

Those are all the rules you need to know when deciding what should and shouldn't be capitalized in your title. Be sure to be mindful that the rules for sentence cases tend to be very different from title cases, and you'll be on your way to producing quality content. Of course, there's more to creating quality content, whether it be an article, book, or blog post, our team of content writers can help. [post_title] => Capitalizing Your Title: The Dos, Don'ts and Details [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => capitalizing-your-title-the-dos-donts-and-details [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 08:52:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 12:52:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2636 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 135 [max_num_pages] => 14 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => 1 [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => 1 [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => afb69197a93a4f2cdd3e4767a2345262 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
Capital title feature

Capitalizing Your Title: The Dos, Don’ts and Details

There are varying and often confusing rules to the use of the English language and…

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                    [post_content] => Content writing topics

Are you at a loss for content writing topics for your blog? There are plenty of evergreen topics that suit just about any blog. Read on to find out.

1. Advice and Opinion Pieces

Life advice can be a great way to drive readership up, especially if you've cultivated a following based on opinion pieces. Posts like these give you a chance to form an intimate connection with your readers by providing solutions to their problems. You could talk about anything that relates to your niche. The best thing about advice is that it doesn't require much substantiation, so instead of backing everything up with data, you just have to sit down and think with an open mind. The second best thing, meanwhile, is that advice like this doesn't get old, especially if you’re coming from a place of authority. While things of a time-sensitive nature, such as tech reviews and current events, get dated quickly, the way life works changes very slowly in comparison. So while a two-year-old review of a phone won't be relevant at all anymore, life advice from six years ago will be worth just as much to one of your newer readers.

2. Anecdotal Topics, Drawing from Personal Experience

Similarly to the previous entry, this one relies on the social capital that people associate with your brand name. They'll want to know what you've been doing with your life and the things that have helped shape you into who you are now. Writing about anecdotes from your life allows you to turn journal entries into blog posts. You don't have to read anything, you don't have to premeditate too much either. You just think of an event and let the words go flow. As with life advice, posts like these allow you to develop your writing style, adding and subtracting traits that will eventually help your readers truly identify with that style and brand voice. Since you're also talking about your own experiences here, you're also getting the chance to strike a chord with your audience in a way that few other things can. Giving people a window into yourself helps them connect to your writing, perhaps even relate to it, which is a great way to ensure that they keep coming back to your site for more. Again, because this event is specific to you, the written content will be too, and you don't have to worry about putting your own spin on things or trying to distinguish yourself from everyone else out there. It just comes with the territory by default. Your content writing efforts won't ever get dated because it's an event from your life, and your take on it. As long as you're smart about how you leverage your opinion for your specific audience, people will always be able to find worth in the post, even if the event itself becomes obscure overtime. If you've got the perfect anecdote, but you just can't find the right words to do justice to it, consider tagging us in. Our blog writers have helped many prominent bloggers structure their content to deliver the best possible experience to their readers while also staying true to the essence of the event

3. Focus on Local Events and Attractions

writing about local events If your business has a local element to it, whereby you’re providing services within a geographical area, covering local events or places is a great way to engage potential customers. Every big city's got its own highlights, and you can take a visit to any easily identifiable hotspot and write about it to let your audience know what it's like and what you thought of it. Bonus points if the attraction you're discussing is unique to your locality. If you don't live in a big city and there's not much going on around your town, you can instead foucs on an event and subsequently pivot to a conversation about what’s happening where you are. If you're an avid traveler, blogging about the destinations, your visit, and the attractions within those destinations can be a great source of fresh content - especially if you can adequately capture the essence of that experience and explain it through your words. People are all about secondhand experiences – some might say a desire to live vicariously through others is what got blogging to really take off in the first place.

4. Write About Prevailing Social Issues

This is another type of opinion piece, but it deserves its own entry because it doesn't fall into any other categories. You can write about what you consider an "issue of our time", like climate change, problems relating to modernization and modernized societies, income and gender disparity, and many others. You can pick up any one of these issues and try to paint a clearer picture of them for your audience while also giving your own opinion as well. Tread the line carefully, though. Some topics can carry social importance, so adopting too radical a view may alienate some members of your audience. There's one of two ways to tackle such cases. Its best to adopt a more neutral standpoint that outlines mainstream arguments on either side, but you can also adopt a more candid approach. At the end of the day, it's all about the kind of persona you've built through your blog and how you wish to express yourself. Hot topics do draw big crowds, and your content writing will do well to tap into this.

5. Discuss the Journey of Learning a Particular Skill

blog writing about learning craftsmanship Some businesses, particularly those that have to do with craftsmanship, can use their blog posts to discuss the journey one of their talented professionals took in the pursuit of their craft. If you're a digital agency, you could have a piece written about one of your most senior graphic designers. If you're an independent blogger, you could write about a skill you'd learnt personally. Talk about what motivated you to start, how you developed that interest, and how much you've learnt up till now. Insightful, informative topics covered in a manner that serves to educate your audience are the perfect way for a blog to put out content that helps enrich an audience member's life. That's attention captured, and a reader who'll be returning to your blog to check up on updates in the future. Granted, the journey of learning the skill, or the expertise that goes into providing a particular skill, may become outdated overtime. If it does, you can discussthe evolution of your own craft and the differences between then and now.

6. Write a Fictional Anecdote

Generally, a blog is not fictitious. If anything, a blog is as far removed from fiction as it could be, since blogs deal with aspects of day-to-day life, experience-based accounts from real people. However, a great way to illustrate some abstract point, or demonstrate perspective, is to use a fictional event as the vehicle for it. A narrative is a great way to get readers hooked, and a fictional one is all the better. Rather than typing out your views, why not spin a story between two invented characters that sheds light on the merits of those views. This type of piece might suit some blogs better than others. Depending on how much you enjoy fiction, you could even make a fictional anecdote a regular part of your weekly or monthly offering. Even commercial websites could have a weekly section where the company mascot discusses the latest additions to their product catalogue.

7. Revisit Past Posts That Were Popular

Value added content When you've constantly been churning out content, you've likely revisited the same subject multiple times. Even if yours is a general-purpose blog that, for example, regularly comes up with lists of popular products in different eCommerce marketplaces. Any blog will have callbacks to content that was published earlier. By discussing pieces that received a lot of attention when they were first published, you let newer members of your audience know what they had to offer. In doing so, you're also allowing yourself to hook them with any one of your most popular titles. This strategy lets you capitalize on things that have already worked for you, is what we're saying. But it's about more than just that. If you're talking about technical content, a review of a past article could very well span an article in itself. You could discuss developments since the previous piece was written and address the technical shortcomings of the previous content. In doing so, you show your audience just how dedicated you are to your particular domain and also the depth of your knowledge within that domain. Based on our years of experience writing listicles for various blogs in various domains, we can tell you that a list of the best articles from the past year can be a great way to wrap up a year of great content, and it might just end up being your most popular piece to start off the next. If you'd like, we could even write it for you.

8. Share Your Opinion On Another Person's Opinion (or a Fresh Development).

Pieces like these are great for both establishing the personality of your brand as well as capitalizing on what's already been put out there. Don't forget to take advantage of what we call the trickle-down effect of popular content. If any popular content creator, policymaker, or celebrity comes out with an opinion that gets people talking, you can discuss those opinions for some pretty relevant press. Speaking of relevance, it plays a key role in driving the popularity of such a post. You've got to have a finger on the pulseof current affairs to benefit from pieces like these the most since they tend to have a very short period between having nothing out there regarding the event and being completely saturated with very similar content. For someone running a blog on politics, this can mean competing with other prominent politics and news blogs to be the first on the scene. If you feel up to it, you can even use articles like these to respond to the opinions discussed in the media you're covering. You let your audience know your take on a particular topic, ensuring that everything you're releasing yourself is wholly original. The best part is that in today's day and age, there's a lot of newsworthy developments constantly occurring, so you're not strapped for source material in the slightest. Of course, when you're covering something that's very recent, you can't really predict how much public interest a story will attract. Try to look for big names or popular people. If you're writing a finance blog,you can definitely do a piece on Apple CEO Tim Cook's new salary package and discuss developments in the company (and improvements in profit) since he took the helm.

To Conclude

That was our list of 8 timeless content writing topics. If you'd like to know more about value-added content, find out here. If you'd like to know more about our services and how we can help you revamp your content portfolio, click here to send in an inquiry.

Are your listicles not getting enough traffic?

Let our team of article writers create content that gets your results. [rfp_banner_form formnum="1"]
[post_title] => 8 Timeless Content Writing Topics for Your Blog [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-timeless-content-writing-topics-for-your-blog [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 11:06:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 15:06:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2656 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2646 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-25 09:41:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-25 13:41:52 [post_content] => Rules for writing great articles Writing great articles is not a skill you can learn overnight. It may not be something you are born with, but it is definitely something you can master by putting in the hard work. It takes writers years to hone their craft, and even then, they cannot achieve perfection. In fact, it won't be wrong to say there is no such thing as perfect writing. Everyone has a unique way of expressing their thoughts and beliefs. What matters is how their words resonate with others. A good article can educate people about a new idea, whereas a great article can change minds and encourage people to take action. Whether it is something as simple as clicking on a link and making a purchase or something as complex as adopting a new lifestyle, powerful writing carries a lot of weight and is worthy of respect. If you are looking to improve your article writing skills, learning these rules can be a valuable addition to your arsenal.

Rule 1: Know Your Target Audience

Before you put pen to paper – figuratively, of course – you should ask yourself who you're writing for. Now, most people will say they write for themselves. This is often the correct answer because we're our own biggest critics. Nevertheless, whether you are writing an article for affiliate marketing or working on a magazine article, the first thing you need to do is determine your audience. If you write for a pharmaceutical company or a law firm, you must already have a clear idea of who will be reading your copy. However, if you are an employee at a content marketing firm or work as a freelancer, you may have to do a little research to create a reader profile. It will help you understand their interests and motivation to click on your post. You can start by asking yourself the following questions:
  • Who will read this article?
  • Why would they read this article?
  • What will this article do for them?
Once you have found the answer to these queries, you can get a step closer to writing great articles. Try and learn about the factors that may excite your readers and the things that may not sit well with them. Doing so will help you figure out how you can get your audience to see your point of view or buy what you're selling. However, if you want to grow as a writer, don't limit yourself to an ideal audience. Think about other people who may find your article exciting or may connect with it on an emotional level.

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Rule 2: Research, Research, Research

It is always a good idea to write on topics you are passionate about. Be it your love for abstract art or your interest in marine biology, try writing about things that bring you joy. Alternatively, if you have a strong but unfavorable opinion about something, your personal feelings will undoubtedly add some substance to your writing – as long as you don't make your post sound too biased. However, no matter how much you know about a particular idea, make sure to conduct in-depth research before creating an outline for your piece. Read as much as you can. Learn about the history and background of the topic and how others around the world may have perceived it. Many writers allot a specific time frame for their research. In theory, it may work. But depending on what you're writing and who you're writing for, it may not be a good idea to limit your research process to a few minutes. In addition, don't cut any corners. Poor research is among the leading reasons most articles fall flat. On the other hand, good research helps us build our knowledge and facilitates learning. It also makes us more confident in our writing while nourishing our minds. Your research can make or break the article. If you want your words to make an impact, back up your arguments with facts and figures.

Rule 3: Grab the Reader's Interest

Once a person clicks on your article, you merely have seconds to make an impression. Since your title is the first thing a reader sees after opening your post, you must take extra care to make it compelling and interesting. Ideally, your main heading should convey what your article is about without divulging too much. Sound confusing? Well, your title should be an accurate representation of what the reader will find in the content body. However, it should also create an aura of mystique without being misleading. The next thing you should write a short and concise introductory paragraph to draw in your readers. A large chunk of text right at the beginning of an article may distract the reader. Worst case scenario, it may even stop them from reading any further. Therefore, it is pertinent to keep your opening short and attention-grabbing. It doesn't have to be something extraordinary. But it should at least capture the interest of your audience and encourage them to read what you have to say. Consider keeping your intro limited to two or three short sentences. It can even be a one-liner, depending on how well you can craft it. If your words are easy to scan and provide value, there is a good chance your reader will also make an effort to explore the article. Tips for writing articles

Rule 4: Make Your Article Visually Appealing

One of the most significant rules of writing great articles is making them visually appealing. You can create an element of interest by adding stunning photos and informative videos to your content. Moreover, try to incorporate well-explained charts and intriguing infographics wherever you can in your post. Also, if you come across a graphic that is relevant to your article but seems complex, consider taking some time to explain it to your audience patiently. You can also create customized images to make your piece look more professional. It will also help break up the bulky wall of text. Most brands invest extensively to procure graphic designers to develop valuable marketing content. Another way to make your article more attractive is by writing shorter paragraphs. Negative space in between the short paragraphs can help break the visual clutter. It allows your audience to read and digest each point before moving on to the next one. Here are some more ways you can make your pieces more reader-friendly.
  • Cascading subheadings
  • Bold and italicized words
  • Hyperlinks
  • Bullet points
  • Embeds
These factors will breathe a new life into your articles and motivate your readers to spend more time on them. Also, once you are done with writing articles, don't forget to edit and proofread them. Our years of experience in this field have made us pros at writing content for your site. For more information, please feel free to give us a call.

Rule 5: Add Substance to Your Articles

How many times have you found an article on your newsfeed that had a fantastic title but didn't have any substance? Unfortunately, it happens a lot. These click-bait articles are usually packaged as something worthwhile. However, they rarely tell you anything new or valuable. Although these posts manage to fulfil their target by getting more clicks, they leave the readers frustrated and unsatisfied – which is the exact opposite of what you should aim for. After all, one of the most important rulesforwriting great articles is never to leave the reader dissatisfied or craving more. If you want to improve your article writing skills, aim to add value to your words. It should provide new information or a fresh perspective by viewing the topic from a unique angle. Instead of barely scratching the surface, take a deep dive into the subject and look for ideas that require a detailed and nuanced discussion. Your content should solve problems and present solutions. It should connect with people on a deeper level and stimulate their imagination. Creating value-added content will encourage your readers to visit your piece over and over again. Meanwhile, a shallow article may stop them from ever making that effort again. Moreover, if you have a strong opinion, don't be afraid to share it with the world. However, please keep yourself open to criticism and be gracious with the feedback you receive. After all, your readers have a right to agree or disagree with your words.

Rule 6: Don't Water Down Your Words

Want to write with conviction? Don't let your fears hold you back. More often than not, the fear of judgment and criticism refrain writers from reaching their full potential. It is easy to develop a mindset where you don't want to displease your editor or write something that your audience may not fully agree with. As a result, you start using soft language and adopt a pacifying tone. In some instances, it might work in your favor. However, in most cases, it makes your writing look watered down and ineffective. Your message may even get lost in translation if you spend too much energy on creating a perfect post that keeps everyone happy. Therefore, the next time you write an article and have the nagging fear of "what if they don't like it," please immediately push aside those negative thoughts. While it is essential to make sure your words don't spread misinformation, you must not let the fear of disagreement hold you captive. If you believe in a specific cause or an idea, write about it without entertaining any second thoughts. You can't please everyone. It would help if you accepted that there would be times when your message will not resonate with the readers, and that's completely fine. Receiving a negative comment or a harsh criticism may put you in a bad mood for a few hours. But don't let it stop you from writing articles that can add value.

Summing Up the Rules for Writing Great Articles

Writers never stop learning and growing. Hence there is no set formula that will enable you to produce brilliant content. Nevertheless, a few important rules of writing articles can set you on a path to success and help you create content that will stand the test of time. The rules include learning about your target audience, conducting in-depth research, and reeling in the reader with your compelling headline. Moreover, your article must have bullet points, images, graphics, and other visual elements to increase reader engagement. You can also add substance to your articles by asking the right questions and providing the readers with the correct answers. In addition, make sure you write with conviction and never water down your words due to fear of criticism. If you are interested in our article writing service, please drop us an email today. Our talented writers are experienced in all niches and can help you grow your business and reach a larger market segment. [post_title] => 6 Rules for Writing Great Articles [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 6-rules-for-writing-great-articles [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 10:16:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 14:16:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2646 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2643 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-19 08:57:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-19 12:57:30 [post_content] => White Paper writing What is a white paper, and why has this inbound marketing channel become such a key part of online marketing strategies for businesses. Well for one, it is a deep-dive form of content that makes use of reliable resources and case studies with the purpose to educate readers regarding a particular topic. Such content pieces are great for businesses to present themselves as leading experts in their fields and attract other experts and customers to their products or services. Writing and formatting a white paper is in many ways similar to writing an eBook, with the only difference being that whitepaper writing requires a lot more research and knowledge on the given subject. Whitepaper writing requires dedication and a commitment to producing content that is unparalleled. Doing this in one day is a Herculean task best left to experts. This is where our white paper writing service comes in. With a team of expert white paper writers with diverse expertise, you can rest assured; we’ll deliver well above expectations.

Writing a White Paper Quickly

White paper writing 2 The initial part is the hardest mainly because of a load of information at your disposal. Getting lost in this information is highly likely and presenting findings and data without following a narrative is even more so. Luckily, with our tips and tricks, you’ll find the going easier.

1. Topic Selection

When it comes to topic selection, writing on any industry-relevant subject is not a good idea. You need to understand what your audience will connect with the most and how your qualifications come into play. Additionally, it would also help if you chose a topic that was only briefly covered by others. You can also network with experts within your organization or use other crowdsourcing techniques to have a better command of the subject. If you want your paper to get featured on other websites or SERPs, you should focus on creating a unique paper and filling a gap within the content already available. One great way to select a topic is by starting an online poll. Polls will help you get an idea of what your readers are interested in while also getting them excited for an upcoming paper.

2. Target Audience

Your target audience will determine the kind of tone, voice, and research that will be required for the paper. For example, if the purpose of your paper is to attract B2B customers, then perhaps adding technical jargon will not be a problem. However, if your target audience is not well-versed in the subject, you may need to take a different approach. Additionally, you should also focus on relevant keywords and the platforms where the audience will read your content. Choosing specific platforms will also help later on when you’re outlining and formatting the paper.

3. Intro and Conclusion

Why should your readers get excited about reading the paper? The introduction should include a brief description of what the paper includes and why readers will benefit from it. Most readers decide whether they’ll read an entire paper after reading the introduction. So, make sure to grab their attention and tell them why they should continue reading. Address the value of information and the benefits of your paper early on. The conclusion will help readers make a final decision about the entire paper. This section is where you can market the company’s products or services and persuade the audience to take a specific action. Adding business details and a CTA is best left for the outro of the paper.

4. Useful Information

You might see a paper as a perfect opportunity to promote your business and its products or services. However, it'll be best not to forget that the whitepaper's main purpose is to provide useful information and increase your readers’ knowledge. Additionally, this is also your chance to present yourself as a trustworthy industry leader, and a salesy paper will not be sufficient to do that. Use reliable sources, data, and stats and provide expert opinions on them instead of mere advertisements.

5. Keep Building on First Draft

You should draft several copies of the paper down the line to ensure no useful information was left out. You can keep updating the white paper and improving on it even after the first draft is out. One great way to do this is to write several copies and take a fresh outlook each time. You can also have other experts or professionals within the organization give it a read to spot any errors in the document.

6. Grabbing the Readers’ Attention

The technicalities and formalities included in writing a paper can make the tone of it extremely dull. However, instead of focusing on numbers and statistics, you should try adding more value with a perfectly flowing conversation. Keeping your readers’ attention from beginning till the end in a detailed and thorough paper might be difficult. However, as long as you follow the above-mentioned tips, you’ll be able to write a compelling copy.

Formatting a Whitepaper

Formatting a whitepaper When you’re formatting a whitepaper, you should remember to include an easy-to-read and clear title page. The title page will include the subject of the paper, names of experts who have helped create the document, publication date, and author name[s]. You should also divide your paper into headings, subheadings, and sections. This will help you keep your paper organized and provide a better reading experience. Typically, H1 and H2 headings are used in a paper for headings and subheadings, respectively. It’s also pertinent to note that not all pages of your paper need to be text-heavy. You can present highlights, critical details, and takeaways in a separate section of the document. Using colours will also help readers to find important chunks of information. However, remember not to use red, as red is mostly associated with edits in a file. Easy one-pages can also be used for a summary of the text-heavy sections of your paper. Finally, you should also ensure that your paper feels and looks consistent throughout. Typography, colours, and visuals will play an important role in shaping the readers' experience, so it’s also important to give special attention to such elements. The following are some important sections of a typical white paper:
  • Title
  • Abstract
  • Problem statement
  • Background
  • Solution
  • Conclusion
  • References

White Paper Mistakes to Avoid

Whitepaper mistakes to avoid Since white paper includes a lot of research and analysis, it’s always important to keep in mind the mistakes you’re likely to make and should avoid. Keeping this list in front of you will help you focus on the proper direction for the paper while avoiding mistakes that can lead to a poor reading experience for your audience. Let’s take a look at some common paper writing mistakes you should avoid at all costs:
  • Not conducting adequate research.
  • Making it sound like a sales pitch.
  • Not following a narrative or a story.
  • Creating a bad design for the paper.
  • Not providing relevant examples or supporting your arguments.
  • Making last-minute changes.

Types of Whitepapers for Businesses

Contrary to popular belief, this type of content writing is not new. The term was first used in 1922, when the British Government published the Churchill White Paper of 1922. A white paper, if well-written- will give your company a competitive edge and present you with an opportunity to influence readers to pick a particular solution for an existing problem in your industry. White papers are a great way to steer the decision-making process of your current or potential customers in a way that’s beneficial to the business. There are several types of white papers companies can use. Let's take a look at the six most popular styles:

1. Educational

As the name suggests, this white paper is used to inform and educate readers regarding a specific topic in a particular industry. The core function of this content is to provide valuable information and answers to the questions that a company’s customers and prospective customers might have. The focus of this is to teach customers what they don’t already know and present a guide. You can use inbound marketing tactics and write how-to’s or give an in-depth analysis of a new industry or technology when writing an educational white paper.

2. Problem Solving

A problem-solving white paper requires persuasive writing techniques, credible sources, and a mature tone. You should think outside the box to present solutions to a problem your customers might have. Of course, the purpose of this type of white paper is to push out your products and services in a subtle manner. However, in doing that, you should focus on presenting unique ideas and steps to solve a particular problem. Think of the solutions that already exist and how you can cater to the same problems with a different approach. Problem-solving whitepapers are also great for sharing company values and beliefs.

3. Technical

A technical white paper provides technical details about an industry, products, services, or technology. You can offer details of your particular products and how to use them in this document. To strengthen the credibility of your technical white paper, you can also present some visuals and case studies. Typically, the purpose of this document is to attract technical buyers to your particular product or service. Your focus should be on your audience and making the copy error-free, concise, and easy to comprehend.

4. Market Research

A whitepaper based on market research includes an executive summary that highlights important data and provides a professional analysis of it. This document typically includes a lot of graphs and interesting analyses or arguments. Such white papers are excellent for PR, and they can either present trends, highlights, and findings or an argument based on the data presented. You can evaluate recent updates on a particular topic in your industry and present interpretations or predictions based on them.

5. Visionary

Typically used by technology-based companies, this type of white paper shows a reader why a particular business is trustworthy and best for long-term partnerships. This document gives innovative insights and provides arguments for why some products or services will never become outdated. You can also use this copy to showcase the visionary experts who work at your organization.

6. Knowledge Papers

Used for both ATL and BTL campaigns, these papers include a debate-style writing technique that puts you in a credible, authoritative, and visionary position. You can choose to address an existing industry debate or create a new one. However, the focus of this paper will be to make your readers listen, thus making persuasion a critical part of it.

Do You Need Help Creating a Whitepaper for Your Business?

We have several years of experience and a proven track record of customer satisfaction when it comes to creating compelling whitepaper copies for businesses. We provide 100% original content, accommodation for urgent requests, proofreading and editing services, unlimited revisions, 24-hour customer support, and ghost-written copies for all our clients. So, if you’re on the lookout for experts in business, technology, hybrid, or product comparison-related white paper writing services, contact us now by calling (877) 897-1725. [post_title] => Writing and Formatting a White Paper Fast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-and-formatting-a-white-paper-fast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 09:03:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 13:03:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2643 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2636 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-14 08:50:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-14 12:50:30 [post_content] => Title capitalization There are varying and often confusing rules to the use of the English language and none so much as title capitalization. With a language that's so pervasive and commonly used, you're bound to find different schools of thought that define the rules in their own way. When it comes to print media and even forms of online written content, the rules can get even more difficult to ascertain. Specifically, when you talk about writing an article, book or even a social media post – thes rules can get very detailed and all the more elusive. There is an abundance of different style guides out there, and even veteran writers can find themselves making mistakes every now and again. If you've found yourself stumped on your journey towards creating exceptional online content, this guide is for you.

Simple Rules for Title Capitalization

Before we can get into the exact nuances that matter with each style, let's look at the things that most styles have in common. To start off…

Always Capitalize the First and Last Words

Let's start with a fairly straightforward rule. Always capitalize the first and last word of your title, regardless of what those words are. For example: Incorrect: "tips to capitalizing titles" Correct: "Tips to Capitalizing Titles"

Always Capitalize oYur Nouns

While the jury might be out on other parts of speech, all of your mainstream style guides agree that nouns are of great importance in a title. A noun is defined as a word that identifies a class of objectsor a specific instance of that class, where the object in question can be any place, animal, or thing (real or abstract). Common nouns deal with class identifiers, while proper nouns deal with instances. Consider the following sentence: "Hello, my name is Jim." Now it's easy to tell that the word "Jim" carries importance here since it contributes heavily to the sentences communicated. So is the word "name", since it determines what the word "Jim" defines. In this case, "Jim" is an example of a proper noun, while "name" is a common noun, and when you're writing in prose or paragraphs, the rules state that you're only supposed to capitalize proper nouns, while common nouns are left in lower case unless they're starting off a sentence. Titles, however, are different. If there was a title in our sentence, the word "name" would also be capitalized, regardless of whichever style you're using. Pronouns are the same; you shouldn't write words like "I", "You", "We", or "Us" without capitalizing them. Common and proper nouns are both categories of principle words, as are pronouns, so you shouldn't usually leave them in the lowercase. So, in this case, our final statement becomes: "Hello, my Name is Jim" We're gradually getting closer to a statement that would function perfectly as a title, but we're not yet there. Next up…

Always Capitalize Your Verbs, Adverbs, and Adjectives

Words like "my" and "your" can be confusing since they function as different types of speech depending on how they're used. Technically speaking, they're attributive adjectives or adverbs denoting possession. This means that they commute the ownership attributed through a pronoun to a common noun or verb. If "I have a car", then that car, by definition, is "my car". The English language doesn't require you to capitalize your possession bearing adjectives and adverbs while writing sentences, but titles are different once again. All styles, including the APA (American Psychological Association), MLA (Modern Language Association), CMOS (Chicago Manual Of Style, at times, shortened to CMS), and AP (Associated Press) styles require you to capitalize all of your adverbs and adjectives, regardless of their position in a title. So going back to our initial statement, we had: "Hello, my Name is Jim" This now becomes: "Hello, My Name is Jim" Which is our finalized version of the title.

Always Leave Your Articles in Lower Case

Articles are words such as the, a, and an, which tell you whether you're referring to a general or specific object (i.e.the calculator refers to a specific calculator vs. a calculator, which is used to make general statements about calculators). As a rule of thumb, it's good to keep in mind that all articles are left in lower case unless they start or end your title.

The Tricky Part of Capitalizing Your title

Now that we've covered the broad strokes version of what to capitalize and what to leave in lower case let's look at parts of speech that have more intricacies involved.

Prepositions

The first area of contention, which most people tend to have trouble with, is prepositions. Prepositions are words that are usually used before pronouns and other nouns to define relations between objects. So when you say someone "arrived after dinner", or that "they were resting inside the room", the words after and inside are actually examples of prepositions. Other examples of prepositions include in, with, within, without, besides, among, around, above, below, across, against, and many more. Different schools of thought have differing opinions regarding what to capitalize and what to leave in regular case in a title when it comes to prepositions.

APA Citation

Regarding the APA citation style, you're only supposed to capitalize your longer prepositions (four letters or more) while leaving shorter ones in lower case. So when you're dealing with examples such as "A Walk Through the Meadow" you have to capitalize the word "Through", even though it's a preposition and it isn't situated at the beginning or end of your title. However, if you're using a shorter preposition, such as in the case of "A Walk in the Park", the preposition is written in lower case.

AP Stylebook

The Associated Press Stylebook is similar in that you only capitalize longer prepositions.

Chicago Manual of Style

The Chicago Manual of Style is slightly more difficult to deal with regarding what you should and shouldn't capitalize. The general rule is that you should never capitalize any prepositions or conjunctions unless:
  • They're used adverbially or adjectivally
  • They're used as conjunctions
  • They call for emphasis or are stressed upon
The first two rules are fairly direct and leave little room for the imagination. If you're saying"My Clothes are Soaked Through" or "Think It Through", you're using the word ‘through’ as an adverb, and it needs to be left capitalized. Similar is the case above when we talk about "A Walk Through the Meadow". The word through is being used as an adjective in this example, so it'll be capitalized once again. The third rule is a little more ambivalent, so you've got room to be creative in the third scenario. After all, what you choose to emphasize or draw the reader's attention to is entirely up to you as the writer, so you can justify capitalizing prepositions in some cases where they play a critical role in defining the meaning of your title.

MLA Style

The last major style we've got to look at is the Modern Language Association style, most commonly used in liberal arts or humanities texts. MLA advises you to leave all your prepositions in lower case, except when they're being used as subordinating conjunctions. We'll cover the specifics of these in the next section. For now, it's best to just keep in mind that MLA doesn't have a word length requirement when it comes to capitalizing prepositions within your title; if you're dealing with a preposition, leave it in lower case.

Conjunctions

There are two kinds of conjunctions in the English Language: subordinating conjunctions and coordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions are words that join two individual statements of equal relevance and importance. Think of words like "and" and "or"; when you say you'll "have either breakfast or lunch", or when you say that you "intend to visit the barbershop and the tailor", the order in which you use the noun terms is usually unimportant. This is because coordinating conjunctions join together two statements of the same grammatical relevance. One statement isn't a precursor or a prerequisite to the other. Subordinating conjunctions like "before", "after", and "until" are different. If you say"I ate before dusk", it's not the same thing as saying "It was dusk before I ate". In fact, both statements have mutually exclusive meanings. One says that you ate your meal before a certain time, while the other says that a certain amount of time had passed before you got to eat. Both cannot be true together. This is the key difference between subordinating and coordinating conjunctions. Subordinating conjunctions combine two statements where one statement is somehow dependent upon the other, either to show one as a necessary consequence of the other or the exact opposite. There's a lot of overlap between prepositions and subordinating conjunctions, and there're plenty of words (like all three of our examples up there) that function as both conjunctions and prepositions. When it comes to the Associated Press Stylebook or the APA Style guide, you're supposed to never capitalize your conjunctions, regardless of the type, unless they're more than four letters long. When it comes to CMOS and MLA, you can only capitalize subordinating conjunctions but never coordinating conjunctions.

Compound Words

Compound or hyphenated words require some handling if you insert them into your titles, but they're just a few rules you need to be aware of. They're the same for the Chicago, APA, and MLA style guides, so you don't have to worry about remembering different rules for each. To start off, if the compound word consists of two separate individual words that carry meaning, you'll capitalize both. An example of this is "self-report", which would be written as "Self-Report" if part of a title. Secondly, if you're dealing with a hyphenated word that consists of a prefix and another word, you'll capitalize just the prefix and leave the actual word in lower case. So the word "anti-inflammatory" would be written as "Anti-inflammatory". The same also applies to words with a single letter attached as a prefix (such as t-shirt, which would be written as T-shirt). Finally, if you're dealing with a compound word that contains prepositions, articles, or coordinating conjunctions, you'll leave the preposition, article, or coordinating conjunction in lower case while capitalizing the rest of the word as outlined above. So a word such as "holier-than-thou" would be written as "Holier-than-Thou" within a title.

The Final Word

Those are all the rules you need to know when deciding what should and shouldn't be capitalized in your title. Be sure to be mindful that the rules for sentence cases tend to be very different from title cases, and you'll be on your way to producing quality content. Of course, there's more to creating quality content, whether it be an article, book, or blog post, our team of content writers can help. [post_title] => Capitalizing Your Title: The Dos, Don'ts and Details [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => capitalizing-your-title-the-dos-donts-and-details [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 08:52:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 12:52:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2636 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2632 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content] => Tips for magazine article writing Do you wish to see your byline adorning the pages of your favorite publication? Do you want to build a reader base that awaits your next article with bated breath? Well, with a little bit of work, you can take your magazine article writing skills to the next level. The key to writing great magazine articles is to create content that engages from start to finish, and provides value to the reader. Regardless of which magazine you are aiming for, a few tips can help you master your craft and produce articles that any publication in the world would be proud to put out for you. However, before we delve into our tips on writing magazine articles, let's take a moment to understand how this particular form of writing differs from other online content writing.

Magazine Article Writing Vs. Other Forms of Writing

Writing an article for a magazine is not the same as writing one for a newspaper or an online directory. Moreover, the pieces you may see in a magazine are inherently different from the content you may find in journals and books as well. The tone and style of these articles vary with each publication, genre, and topic. However, two things set these pieces apart from other forms of writing – they allow more room for creativity and tend to be more visually appealing. While article writing and book writing also require creative input and critical thinking, drafting magazine articles allows you to play with different visual aspects. The use of colorful graphics and photographs to capture attention becomes a must. Furthermore, the length of magazine articles depends on the publication you’re writing for, what you're writing and who you're writing for. In most cases, writing content for the internet does not come with word count limitations. And insofar as books are concerned, you’re usually your own boss. But to give you an idea, an average magazine article can be anywhere between half a page to a dozen pages. Nonetheless, the word count for 12-page pieces is usually not as high as you'd think since they are interspersed with pictures and advertisements.

Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Connect

article writing Here are some tips on how to create magazine articles that will grab your readers' attention.

1. Write About Things You Are Interested In

You are more likely to create engaging content if you write about something you find intriguing or exciting. Your passion for a specific cause or topic will not only show in your work, but it will improve the quality of the output automatically. Articles written with passion are more likely to connect as they give readers a peek into your heart and soul. If you let your words reflect your love and devotion to the subject of your article, it will convince your readers to trust your judgment and authority. Magazine articles are an excellent medium for talented writers to showcase their skills while playing to their strengths. Moreover, publishers always prefer pieces that have an element of individuality. So, if you are particularly fond of something – be it music, traveling, cooking, or martial arts – make sure to use it as your calling card. However, just because you think you know a topic inside out doesn't mean you should cut corners while conducting research. It is essential to scour the internet and see what others are saying. Also, look for the latest stats and back up your claims with valuable insight.

2. Use Compelling Headings and Sub-Headings

Although this tip is not unique to magazine article writing, it requires a special mention. Your headline is the first thing a reader would see while browsing through the index of their favorite magazine or on the front page of their search engine. It is the focal point of your article, as it draws your readers' attention and encourages them to click on it. Many experts compare a well-crafted headline to a beautiful wrapping paper. However, in reality, it is a gift itself. An excellent headline, paired with equally compelling subheadings, will build the interest of your readers. Therefore, you should put in extra effort to create headlines that perfectly capture the essence of your article without giving everything away. Just make sure they are not misleading. It is also a good practice to include your main keyword in the main heading to make your post easy to discover. We'll discuss more on this later.

3. Reel In the Audience with a Unique Angle

One of the best ways to make your magazine article appealing is by ensuring it has a unique perspective. Start by creating a profile for your target audience and figure out where their interests lie. You can also look at the articles published by your competitors and industry giants. Doing so will help you determine which angles have been discussed before and which require more exploration. Instead of just scratching the surface, dig a little deeper and discover fresh viewpoints that establish you as an expert in the field. Even if you are writing on a mainstream topic, such as a new superhero movie that has recently hit the theatres, focus on the aspects that others have not bothered to explore. Remember, creating value-added content will keep your readers engaged and the publisher happy.

4. Keep It Short, Sweet, and To the Point

Brevity is the soul of any well-written content. If you want your magazine article to remain engaging from the first sentence to the last, you must make it easy to read and understand. It is generally good to use short and simple sentences. You should break your information into small chunks without leaving any room for ambiguity. Of course, depending on the nature of your article, you may have to use a few complex sentences. However, using too many complicated terms and long sentences can distract the readers. Moreover, make sure your readers can follow your train of thought without making much effort. Set the pace to match the article's tone, and don't let your message get lost between long sentences. If your audience finds your magazine article writing skills tedious or frustrating, there is a good chance they won't come back for more. Apart from using short and concise sentences, ensure your paragraphs don't exceed six lines. Adding bulleted lists to your content can also make it easy to skim and comprehend, attracting the readers.

5. Include Visual Elements

Break up huge chunks of text with striking pictures, powerful graphics, and well-explained charts. Including valuable visual elements in your magazine article is a foolproof way to increase audience engagement. They will give your audience a chance to rest their eyes without taking their attention away from the piece. With the right images, you can explain your idea or perspective without saying a lot. Additionally, photos and videos can make your content more memorable. They can help your readers interact with the piece, which may also increase their willingness to return to it. These are among the leading reasons why most publishers and brand owners invest extensively on graphic work to support their written content. How to write articles for magazines

6. Get Your Audience Involved and Invested

Starting your magazine article with a thought-provoking question or a shocking fact can help you grab the interest of your audience from the get-go. If your question is something that your readers can relate to personally, it will undoubtedly compel them to read further. However, to draw the attention of your readers, you must understand their desires and pain points. You should also know about your audience's gender, age, and location to choose your article's right style and tone. After all, the ideas that may intrigue women aged 30 to 45 are not likely to resonate with men aged 50 to 65. Furthermore, always address your readers directly. Writing in the second person will allow you to use words such as "you,” "your," and "yours." Your readers should feel as if you have written the article just for them. Once they build that connection, they'll stay hooked until the very last page. Also, make your piece sound like a discussion one would have with their friend. It shouldn't come across as a lesson or an essay. This magazine article writing tip will surely help your audience feel like a part of the narrative.

7. Don't State Facts, Tell a Story

Storytelling is an art. While anyone can share factual information, it takes expertise and a unique thought process to tell a story. As a writer, your biggest priority should be keeping your readers on their toes as they take in your words and build a world of their own. Whether you are writing about politics or deep-sea diving, your anecdotes and experiences can set your article apart from the rest. Sharing small stories also allows your audience to connect with you on an emotional level. It makes you and your words more relatable. People may not remember the statistics you've shared in your article. But they are most likely to remember the tidbits from your personal life that made their way onto the page. To create compelling content, take inspiration from your past experiences or create fictitious scenarios to leave your audience spellbound. You can also use analogies, quotes, and pop culture references to breathe a new life into your content.

8. Choose Your Keywords Wisely

Magazines are no longer limited to the print medium. You can now access almost every magazine online, with some charging a small subscription fee and others allowing you to read their content for free. Now, you may have heard that we should write for people and not the search engines. Our question is, why not write for both? Creating compelling and engaging content is just not enough. You also need to make your articles discoverable. Search engine optimization or SEO is the most effective way to make sure your audience finds your posts. You need tofind out what people are looking for and incorporate those keywords into your article. According to the SEO best practices, your main keyword should appear at the article's beginning, middle, and end. You can also include two to three additional keywords throughout the content. It will increase the chances of your article ranking higher on Google.

9. Wrap It Up Nicely

Don't let your closing statement go to waste. As you wrap up your article, utilize the last few lines to include a CTA call to action. It is essentially a way for you to tell your readers what to do next. Whether you are looking for feedback or want your audience to check out your latest video series, make sure to include a relevant link that directs them to your preferred webpage or service. The next step is to edit your content. You can use services such as Grammarly or Copyscape to ensure your article is free of mistakes and plagiarism. This is also your last opportunity to format the piece and ensure no negative spaces or weird indentations. Moreover, please use different font sizes for headings, subheadings, and body to increase readability and engagement. You can also use bold words and italicized sentences to make your critical ideas more prominent.

Magazine Article Writing Made Easy

To conclude, there are no set rules to writing a compelling magazine article. However, the tips mentioned above will enable you to break the mold by producing great content. A wisely chosen topic with a unique perspective and great headline can do wonders for your career. Similarly, short and clear sentences sprinkled with personal anecdotes can make your article more fun to read. If you feel a little lost in how to do go it alone, our article writing service could be the order of the day. Our team of experienced article writers ably supported by our team of expert designers can help you create magazine articles that hit the right note every time. [post_title] => 9 Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Hook Readers from Start to Finish [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 9-tips-for-writing-magazine-articles-that-hook-readers-from-start-to-finish [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2632 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2622 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-29 06:30:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-29 10:30:30 [post_content] => how to write product descriptions A compelling product description is crucial to the success of your eCommerce business. For those of you that don’t know, these are essential pieces of marketing copy that describes your product’s features and benefits to potential customers, persuading them to buy. Excellent product descriptions accurately capture the essence of a product to influence purchase decisions. In other words, they can well be the back bone of your online business’s success. Most entrepreneurs and marketers struggle with writing powerful product descriptions that can convert casual bowsers into life-long customers. They craft their copies around factual information and don't focus on the fact that they are selling an actual product to a real person. As a result, most product descriptions look like a block of information you are likely to find at the back of a product label. Below, we have put together some tried-and-tested tips on how to write a product description that converts.

1. Define Your Target Audience

Before you start writing a product description, you must understand the persona of your potential buyer. Defining your target audience can help you address them directly and engage them in a conversation. You can only create an impactful copy if you know who you're writing for and what would compel the reader to buy your product. It is also important to remember that the features that may entice one demographic might not be valuable to the other. Moreover, knowing your audiencecan help you select the right words and answer the right questions. It also enables you to find the perfect tone for the product.For example, you may want to inject humor into a product description for Christmas sweaters, but you can't use the same writing style to sell medical equipment or something more serious, such as coffins. Narrowing down the consumer characteristics can help you draft a copy that is equal parts informative and persuasive. If your product description addresses the pain points, values, interests, and frustrations of your buyers, there is a good chance they'd be willing to spend their hard-earned money on it.

2. Focus on Benefits over Features

Agreat product description must include all the information a buyer may need to make a purchase. It should tell the customer about the unique specifications of your product that set it apart from the rest and share any technical facts that may influence their decision. However, you must also understand that the features you are excited to write about might not necessarily interest your target audience. Some of them may even find it boring. The best way to retain customer attention and capture their interest is by explaining how the product will benefit them. Your copy should describe the advantages of a product and tell the buyer how it will reduce their pain points or enhance their quality of life. Before you start writing a product description, list down the top features of the item you are selling and then translate them into substantial benefits. Moreover, to prevent your copy from looking like an advertisement, refrain from using superfluous words. It would be best if you also avoided using superlatives that you can't justify. Following this tip will help you how to write a description that converts into a sale.

3. Elicit Emotions through Storytelling

A strong product description provides the buyers with all the relevant details and impacts them emotionally. According to a 2009 research study,holding a product in hand increases a person's desire to buy or own it. However, since they can't physically touch your product through their screens, your job is to paint a vivid picture that also packs an emotional punch. If you want your product descriptions to convert, make sure your content tells a story that your potential buyers can connect with. You can set the scene by telling them who created the product and what inspired them to do so. Taking the buyers on the journey of developing the product will allow them to relate to it. Depending on what you're selling, a personal anecdote or an entertaining fact about the product may also increase the buyer's interest. Nonetheless, you must make sure your words don't come across as dishonest or insincere. On the contrary, your story should enable customers to envision the product and how it would add value to their life.

4. Make It Sound like a Real Conversation

conversational product descriptions It may be tempting to sprinkle your product description with fancy words and literary references, but doing so can potentially turn away your customers. So, if you want the buyers to connect with your product emotionally and ultimately buy it, consider adopting a natural tone and using simple words. Ideally, a product description should sound like a conversation between friends. It should flow smoothly and have a life of its own. Instead of making sweeping statements, you should inform your buyers about the features and benefits just like you would share with a friend or a loved one. The customer should feel like you have their best interest at heart and that your words are not merely transactional. Product descriptions that use natural language and a friendly tone can help your eCommerce business  build a loyal customer base. Potential buyers are more likely to purchase if they find your copy to be honest and genuine. It would also help you stand out from the competition and make your products more memorable. If you need help writing product descriptions that sell, please feel free to give us a call.

5. Be Mindful of Power Words

Did you know there are certain words you can include in your product description to elicit a response from your target audience? More often than not, business owners and marketers end up using words such as "revolutionary" or "innovative"to describe a product when it is anything but that. Instead, sprinkle your copy with descriptive words and adjectives that may excite or intrigueyour prospective buyers. For example, if you are writing a product description for a dress, you can replace the terms "pretty" and "high-quality" with "sensational"and"luxurious." According to David Ogilvy, here are some of the most influential words that can turn a casual reader into a buyer.
  • Suddenly
  • Now
  • Announcing
  • Introducing
  • Amazing
  • Sensational
  • Revolutionary
  • Miracle
  • Magic
  • Quick
  • Hurry
Using these power words can take your product description to the next level.

6. Make Your Copy Easy to Scan

A great product description is easy to read and understand. Instead of explaining your product in lengthy and complex paragraphs, consider using simple sentences that get the message across. Customers have a notoriously short attention span when it comes to making online purchases. So, the best thing you can do to keep them interested in your product is to present them with a description that they can scan. For example, you can break down product specifications into bullet points to make them more reader-friendly. Moreover, different font sizes and lots of white space can help break the visual clutter. Your buyer shouldn't have to sift through long pieces of writing to find valuable information. Instead, you should present it to them on a figurative silver platter. Incorporating the product's name into the heading and using highlighted words can also impact the reader's attention span. If you’re struggling to create quality product descriptions at scale, our product description writing service might be what you need.

7. Optimize for Search Engines

Optimize your product descriptions for Google Search Including specific keywords in your product descriptions can help improve your search engine optimization (SEO). This will ultimately increase your chances of ranking high on the search results page. If you want to draft a conversion-oriented copy, make sure to do a little bit of keyword research to find out what the customers are searching for. Once you have found suitable keywords, integrate them and their variations into your content. The SEO best practices suggest placing keywords in the page titles, Meta descriptions, and image tags.  For good measure, include the main keyword at the top and bottom of your page to ensure your customers can easily find your product. It is also worth mentioning that your content should not be stuffed with keywords, as it may make your product description look unauthentic. The goal of optimizing your product description is to help gain new customers. Adding relevant keywords will allow prospective buyers to discover your brand and learn about its values with a few simple clicks on their device. Furthermore, adding relevant tags to product images also carries a lot of weight with search engines, which takes us to our next tip on how to write a product description that compels customers.

8. Always Use Quality Images

As the wise adage goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. If you want to master the art of writing excellent product descriptions, you cannot compromise on the quality of images. As mentioned above, customers cannot physically see or touch your product. While your words can help them envision how the product may look or feel, adding a good image along with your text can actually encourage them to buy it. It is one of the essential parts of a powerful product description. Most high-end brands hire professionals to create stunning photos and videos that capture all the best features of their products. However, spending precious resources on such services may not be feasible for new startups and small businesses. Instead of focusing too much on what your competitors are doing, divert your energy to take a few quality photos that enhance your product and effectively display its unique specifications. As long as your image is large, clear, and in line with the overall theme of your brand, there is a good chance that it will manage to convert readers into buyers. The accompanying copy should also create imagery that entices the customer into imagining what it would be like to hold or use the product.

What a short video regarding product description importance

Our Final Thoughts

Those were our best tips on how to write a product description that compels potential customers to make a purchase. If you are an entrepreneur or a small business owner looking to create brand awareness and improve your conversion rate, our team of content writers is ever-ready to help. To find out more about our services, contact us today. [post_title] => How to Write Compelling Product Descriptions that Convert [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-compelling-product-descriptions-that-convert [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:37:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:37:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2622 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2616 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content] => Bio Writing We’ve all had to be introspective at some point, especially when you’re looking to put yourself out there through a professional bio. You’ve likely thought about who you are or what qualities you embody. You’ve thought about your achievements.  Thinking to yourself is one thing, though, and writing it down for an external audience is entirely another. On the surface, it should be fairly simple. It’s a short paragraph or two describing your professional journey so far and where you intend to take it. But then why do so many people struggle to write a bio that adequately captures who they are? We’ve put together a checklist of the things that combine to make a great bio. To start off:

Start Strong

In many ways, the most important part of your blog is the opening section. A strong introduction not only reels your readers in, it can also serve to highlight the strongest aspects of your repertoire. Those first few lines need to be absolutely spot on to prompt the person reading to continue, so don’t skimp on your trial and error. Try out as many opening lines as you can think of if you feel like your current iteration could be better. Be confident, be honest, and don’t hesitate to strut your stuff. The opening lines are all about making an impact, and there’s a variety of ways to do this. You can open with humour, you can open with an achievement that speaks for itself, or you can open with a reference. There’s room to experiment, so there’s no excuse for trying as hard as you can to think of what fits your bio best.

Be Partial Towards Recent Developments, but Don’t Hesitate to Discuss How Got You Here

Like a resume, the more current your bio is, the better. Make sure you include a sentence or two that tells people, at least vaguely, about where you are now and what you’re doing. It lets prospective interests know what you’re doing these days and whether your skillset is relevant to them. While you might be tempted to list events in order of recency, don’t do that. Not every post is important, and not every move significant. Instead, if there’s a turning point in your professional development, such as a time when you switched fields three years ago, you’re better off addressing that. It’s not as if you’ve got room to be long-winded, but you should still discuss what prompted the switch, so long as you were positively motivated. You can sneak in a line or two about how your prior experience empowers you in your current line of work as well.

Decide on a Tone and Keep It Consistent

A bio is a concise description and one that sees many iterations as your career evolves and your professional development progresses. If you’re used to cutting out and adding in individual lines (and even if you’re not), it’s good to give the whole thing a read over to see if you’re consistent. While the right tone for you will depend entirely on what career you’re in and how you’re most comfortable expressing yourself, there are certain pointers. You shouldn’t be arrogant or overly informal; it’s much better to phrase your brags as subtly as possible and maintain a polite disposition. Achievements are more effective when mildly understated than they are when blown out of proportion, so make sure you maintain a humble tone. Humor isn’t necessarily off the cards, but you have to balance it out with serious statements. Also, your best bet is tongue-in-cheek humor rather than something that might risk offending someone; remember, this is a professional piece. Consistency also extends to whether or not you’re writing in first-person. Don’t go from I to they (first to third-person), or skip the pronoun altogether (implied the first person). This of course is easier said than done, and if it’s not for you – there is no shame in hiring professional bio writers instead.

Don’t Forget to Inject some Personality into Your Writing

personality in your bio One of the most typical mistakes when writing a bio is being too formulaic in your approach. You find something that really works, so you copy the same structure or type out the entire thing in as neutral a tone as possible. Nothing which worked for someone else needs to work just as well for you. Your Bio should be like your fingerprint, abstractly similar but entirely unique in itself. You have an entire lifetime of experiences at your disposal, so be sure to showcase as much of them as you can, as positively as you can. Your writing conveys not only your experiences but also aspects of your outlook and who you are. You shouldn’t shy away from including stuff about your innermost goals and motivations to the extent that you’re comfortable. While you shouldn’t be too flowery in your use of language, don’t be afraid to use more complicated terms where there is merit to them.

Always Double Check Guidelines

The platform or portal you’re submitting your bio to might have specific guidelines for what’s considered a valid submission. Always make sure that you check all the boxes and that you haven’t included anything that they’ve disallowed. This also means that you won’t be able to submit the same exact bio to every single prospect, but that should be standard practice as it is. Make sure you tailor your bio to the sort of opportunity you’re on the hunt for to give yourself the best possible chances.

Be Concise

Top the point writing We’ve already discussed how you shouldn’t pad your bio, but there’s more to a good bio than just keeping things simple. Your bio is meant to be a rich summary of your recent professional experiences, but you don’t need to mention every single thing you’ve already mentioned with your resume. This brings us to another point: you should try to keep repetition between your bio and your resume to a minimum. That’s not to say there should be no overlap at all, but rather, that your bio should only further explore the most important parts of your resume, the parts you want a potential employer to focus on. By emphasizing those tenures, you can draw attention to aspects of your development that may not have been adequately represented as just another bullet point in your CV or LinkedIn profile.

Don’t List Your Achievements

Recall what we said about trying to keep yourself sounding as down to earth as possible. If your bio reads like a list of things you’ve accomplished, you’re not doing it right. Instead of leading every statement with what you are or what you’ve achieved, try to pivot to what you have to offer someone you’d want to establish a professional relationship with. Instead of talking about your skills and how you’ve acquired them, talk about what those skills can accomplish for someone working with you. People want to see what value you bring to the table, so making your bio about what you have to give, rather than just what you have, is a great strategy to employ.

Add a Personal Touch

We’ve already discussed the importance of abandoning the formulaic approach, but a great bio goes further than that. A bio should demonstrate more than just professional experience; it’s a representation of who you are. As such, you can’t expect to paint a clear picture of yourself by talking about your career alone; you can and should include references to personal triumphs and milestones. We’re obviously not talking about detailed narrations (you don’t have the words to spare, nor that much creative license), but you can definitely include distilled versions of them. Simply mentioning that you’re an aquaphobe learning how to swim, for example, can tell your employer plenty about the fact that you take adversity on the chin and that you have a mind to surmount obstacles. Personal touches like these help highlight crucial aspects of your personality that might help distinguish you from other applicants, so it’s a good idea to include something about your life. Another way you could benefit from a personal addition is to use it to demonstrate your more personable traits. This could be through humor, or a line or two about your charitable pursuits, or just what you enjoy doing in your free time. Either way, it helps paint you as more than just a robot with work experience, so be sure to make the most of it.

Maintain a Balance

So you’ve got to include aspects of your personality, personal pursuits, career progression, and current state of employment. While adequately covering all of those focus areas, you also have to flow so that your bio doesn’t read like a series of disconnected statements. And you have to keep to a very strict word count while doing all of the above. This can prove daunting, even for the best of us, and that’s why bio writing is more art than science. It’s also why revising your bio is a very tedious process that can involve hours of brainstorming with very little to show for it.

Watch a short video to learn more about What is a Biography

Bio Writers to Make Your Look Like a Million Bucks

If you’ve been having trouble with figuring out just the right words to put in your bio, or you’re second-guessing what your bio should look like – our team of Professional Bio Writers can help. From techies to published authors, finance execs to teachers – our versatile team of bio writers understands what every bio needs and delivers. [post_title] => How to Write the Perfect Professional Bio [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-the-perfect-professional-bio [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2616 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2608 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-15 06:51:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:51:31 [post_content] => writing SEO friendly content Search engine optimization, or SEO, as it may be known to most of you, is a rapidly evolving discipline that has been on the rise ever since Google took the world of search engines by storm. Accoridngly, learning how to write SEO-firendly articles is number one on the checklist of content producers that want to ace SERPs.

Keep Up-to-date with Google

Last year, Google announced the addition of core web vitals and page experience signals as ranking factors in search results. We won't get into too much detail about what these are specifically just yet, but you should know that your core web vitals tell Google how quickly and smoothly a page loads in front of a user. The other page experience signals are, more or less, boxes you need to check regarding the security of your connection with your users, and that they're being delivered a quality experience that isn't overly annoying or outdated. All we mean to do with the above is highlight that the field of search engine optimization is constantly evolving. With Google needing to constantly roll out updates to combat people finding shortcuts to ranking better (such as black hat backlinking practices) or breaking ranking factors altogether and using them for gaming the system (such as keyword cramming). While Google does come out with its SEO guidelines to help people understand how they can improve their website and put out content in a way that helps them rank better, what Google does not do is tell you exactly how searches are ranked and how much each individual metric contributes to your overall ranking. For all of these reasons and others, keeping up with all of the advancements taking place within the field of SEO can be a difficult task, even for those of us that call SEO their bread and butter.

Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content

If you've tried learning how to do your own SEO before, and you found the process to be too tedious or difficult, then this article is for you. Not only will we go over exactly how you can go about making your content SEO friendly, we'll also let you know key tips and tools you can use to help you with the process.

Tip 1: Select the right topics to write about

A great way to make a splash on those Search Engine Ranking Pages (SERPs) is to select topics that are currently garnering interest amongst the public. Even if your website or business's actual domain area isn't the most popular, get creative and find ways to link it to those popular topics. Remember, even the best-written content won't garner views if you're writing about something that no one wants to read about. This is where learning how to use Google Trends for SEO could be beneficial. Content marketing strategies are great and all, but you'd have to be a magician to get people to read an article they have no interest in. If you're worried that focusing on topics of interest will have you competing with industry giants for rankings, don't be. Remember, recency is also a factor in search results ranking, so simply the fact that you're posting your stuff today is going to get you at least some preferential treatment. And if your stuff is original and out of the box, providing a fresh perspective or some expertise that can't be found elsewhere, that's going to push you up even further. Besides, you shouldn't be worried about the competition anyways; SERPs are full of examples of Davids who counter Industry Goliaths, and the next one might just be you. As long as you can focus on providing quality experience to your users (and do so consistently), it'll always shine through sooner or later. Of course, this is where our article writing service can give you the leg up.

Tip 2: Keyword research is still paramount (and probably will continue to be for at least a while)

SEO-friendly content needs strong keyword research There's one aspect of SEO that hasn't changed much over the years: Using high-interest keywords still helps you rise to the top of rank results. You should make it a routine practice to check out keyword rankings relating to your topic area, once before you've written your piece and once after it's done, right before you publish. Why before you publish? To make sure you haven't overused your keyword or used too many keywords in your text. A piece that's 500 words long shouldn't try to target ten different keywords, and it shouldn't contain fifteen instances of your primary keyword. Black hat hacks like these were popular during the early years of SEO, but Google's done plenty to prevent them from being viable today. Don't fall victim to your own bad practices. For a standard guideline regarding how many instances of a particular keyword should be in an article:
  • Keep yourself to two to three instances at most for a 500-word article
  • Add one for each additional 500 words when it comes to longer articles.
According to this directive, a 2000 word piece should contain six instances of a particular keyword. Naturally, if your keyword is a generic term, you might find yourself using it a bit more, and that's okay, but try to avoid being too repetitive with it. Try for synonyms or abbreviations, anything you can do to avoid making it seem like you've crammed; if you can tell, chances are Google can too. Aside from this, try to be as strategic as you can with your keyword use. Don't rush to put out a piece relating to each popular search term you can find that's relevant to your business. There's such a thing as Keyword Cannibalization; it's where your own articles are competing with one another for the same keyword and actually taking traffic away from one another. We're sure we don't need to spell it out for you, but this isn't a good thing. When it comes to terms that are highly relevant to your website, try to put out long-form content that covers as many aspects of the term as you can, rather than rushing to release content relating to every term people could possibly search for. Be strategic with your content; it will pay dividends in the long run. Oh, and speaking of being strategic…

Tip 3: Plan out an approach to content that lets you make the most of different types of articles

Google and other search engines tend to love websites that are regularly updated. This means releasing daily content for many website owners, even if that content is just a rehashed version of an article they'd put out the previous week. This might work for some people, but it certainly isn't a surefire way to succeed with your content. If you're going to have to repeat yourself eventually, and you know it, you should plan out your topics so that you maximize the amount of time there is between two similar articles. You can use the time in between to figure out how you can cover the same topic or domain area from a different perspective.

Struggling for Ideas? Well, that’s what professionals are for. Our diverse team of content writers are not only well-versed with creating compelling and unique content – but at scale.

Another way to keep things fresh is to cover topical, time-sensitive developments within your focus area. For example, you can write a long-form cornerstone article on content writing best practices, and that article can remain the same for a long while. Instead of writing about that topic again, you can later release content about how opinion pieces are the way to go in 2021 and fill that article with reasons for why perspective based content is especially relevant after we've all experienced a lockdown that cut us off from being exposed to other opinions. While opinion pieces don't inspire the sort of trust that a faultless factual piece might, they're excellent for increasing engagement and getting people talking in your comments section. There's no real substitute for user engagement and no second-guessing the fact that search engines are partial towards content that engages readers, so why not experiment a bit and get creative. And creativity doesn't just have to do with how and what you write about.

Tip 4: Use every channel (and platform) at your disposal to make people aware of the content you're publishing

social media like facebook is key for SEO content Social Media is a great way to get more eyes on your content. If an article on your site isn't getting the traction you'd want it to, posting a link to the article on your business's Facebook page along with a captivating tagline or quote from the article might be just the thing to get those numbers up to desirable levels. More clicks mean more views, and more views mean preferential treatment within search results, so don't be shy about plugging your content wherever you can. There was a time when businesses just needed to have a listing in the Yellow Pages, but that time has long since passed. Now businesses are everywhere, from Facebook and Instagram to Twitter and LinkedIn. There's no reason your business shouldn't have a face on each and every one of these platforms. If you pay enough attention to what works on each of them, you might just find that one, in particular, is extremely conducive to the type of content you're putting out and gets you more traffic than the rest of them. Once you know this, you can start focusing more on generating more content for that platform and using that content to generate more traffic for your e-commerce website or storefront. A content writing service can be your saving grace here. Getting people to your content isn't everything though, you've also got to think about where people are going from your articles…

Tip 5: Make sure you put the right links in your content (and the right type of links as well)

Everyone knows not to link to their competitors. But if you've been in the content game as long as we have, you might also know that you can't just back up your own content with any material you can find that supports your claims. There's a LOT of repetition on the Internet. You can Google any topic and find twenty different articles all saying the same thing using slightly different words. You might think that linking to any one of them serves the purposes you need for your articles, but that just isn't true. So what then, do you link to the best written of those articles? Not always. Informational content, such as the stuff you'd find on a .edu or .gov site. .Org sites are good, too, as long as the article you're linking to isn't trying to sell something itself. SEO-friendly content is written with the intent to inform and it always tends to rank better and contribute more to the credibility of what you're saying than content that has an ulterior motive. Keep that in mind while you're selecting which articles to link to. Credible links get your website more "Authority". Authority is a holistic metric that determines how much clout you have within your domain or focus area. Quality internal links also help you gain authority since users can jump from article to article within your site without finding redundant or otherwise fruitless content. But if you're too liberal with your external links (i.e. links that lead out of your site) you can end up losing authority to the pages you link to. This isn't always a bad thing, but you should try to use "no follow" links for at least some of your outbound links for this reason. No-follow links prevent crawlers from passing authority along from your site to the site you're linking to.

SEO-Friendly Content by Experts

If you've enjoyed this list of SEO-friendly practices to help your website take off, consider reaching out to us to find out more about what we can do to help revamp your content portfolio. We've got years of experience in the industry and a long list of satisfied clientele to back us up, so why not give us a call. [post_title] => Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content to Gain Visibility on Search Engines [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => tips-for-writing-seo-friendly-content [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-15 06:53:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:53:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2608 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2598 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-08 08:17:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-08 12:17:26 [post_content] => Hire professional transcribers Speech recognition has come a long way and has been one of the leading developments in reach towards the Internet of Things. Now, with Google Home and Amazon’s Alexa, we can control just about any aspect of room ambience without moving an inch. While services like these might lead you to believe that speech recognition has evolved to the point where human transcription just doesn’t make sense anymore, we’re still far from being there yet. We’re not saying that speech recognition hasn’t grown by leaps and bounds in the past decade or so, far from it, in fact, it’s just that it’s not quite gotten to the point where it can be considered as reliable as the human mind. In other words, if you want accurate transcriptions where context, punctuation and accents are accounted for, going for a transcription writing service is your best bet. Before we can explore a comparison between these two methods, let us take a look at what both are:

Hiring Professional Transcribers Over Speech Recognition

Manual transcription is fairly straightforward. A person listens to an audio recording and jots down the contents; there isn’t much to explain there. To understand why human beings are better at this task, we must first understand how we interpret language. The human mind is a multi-track processor. This means that it can selectively and intuitively utilize multiple processes towards the same end, switching freely between those processes as the need arises. The most powerful tool we have at our disposal when it comes to understanding speech is the flexible use of context. We can glean details about the subject conversation like several speakers, roles in the conversation, subject matter, and key points, just from listening to the conversation for a small amount of time. Even if there are noisier sections, we can pause, rewind, and play again until we arrive at a reasonable guess for what is being said. If that doesn’t work, we can continue further along in the conversation and figure out what might have gone in a particular section through later references.

How Accurate is Speech Recognition

ASR, or Automated Speech Recognition, is the domain of computer science and technological research that deals with getting computers to understand the spoken word. In an ideal scenario, where you’re dealing with clean (noiseless), high fidelity audio, a computer can indeed measure up to human standards and even compete with top-notch transcribers. Just so you can compare, the human error rate during audio transcription is about four percent, while these artificial intelligence-based technologies usually hover around the five percent mark. That means that they’re almost as good if only slightly worse, than humans at transcribing audio. The ball game shifts a bit when we talk about LVCSR (Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition). These applications are categorized by an extremely large vocabulary of words and fluid conversation between multiple speakers. When it comes to these scenarios, the error rate for humans is still at roughly four to five percent, while their technological counterpart measures in at roughly 8 – 10 percent. An accuracy rate of 10 percent means an error every 10 words, which is far beyond the acceptable amount. But real-world applications are much, much worse. Say you have a phone call or a voice note you’d like transcribed. The background noise can make certain words hard for the speech recognition software to detect, but that’s to be expected. In computer science terms, when you use the word “noise” you’re actually describing different elements that obscure the quality of a particular frame (in the case of audio and video). Noise can come from various sources and increases as you increase volume and distance from the audio capture device. But noise isn’t just an environmental factor, at least not in traditional terms. You see, when we communicate over telephone lines, the audio signal generated by our voices is actually converted to an electrical signal, which travels across large distances and is then converted back into audio for us to hear. These conversions minimize line loss and maximize distance, allowing us to make phone calls across the world. However, “minimize” is a relative term here; while we can hear and understand a person speaking on a phone call, a computer might not be able to do the same. There are certain aspects of speech recognition that computers truly excel at. They’re many magnitudes of times faster, and as such, some programs can sift through hundreds of hours of audio in the time, it would take a human being to complete working on a one-hour transcription. However, to mimic a process as complex as understanding human speech, a computer must break it down into individual tasks. Preprocessing, feature extraction, acoustic modelling, language modelling, and decoding are all individual steps in a process designed to achieve the same results as human listening, but that doesn’t mean that both work in the same way.

Why Hiring a Transcription Service is the Better Option

This fluid use of context and a wider understanding of the way objects are related in the world gives human transcribers an edge over conventional computer-based means. Again, even the most advanced neural networks only attempt to mimic our faculty of working with context, and this mimicry is subject to our own understanding of how our mind works, which is admittedly limited. Systems designed by us to do something our minds do, when we ourselves only have a rudimentary understanding of the internal workings of the human mind, cannot reach the level of accuracy that a professional who has listened to thousands of hours of audio can offer us. Meanwhile, a computer application will break the process down into multiple simple steps, and by the end of all these processes, arrive at a transcription. While we did mention each of the steps that a hypothetical speech recognition tool could take to recognize patterns in speech, knowing what each of these means isn’t necessary for the purposes of this article. You need to know that certain aspects of spoken language don’t necessarily translate very well to the machine equivalent of the listening process. The main issues are as follows:

Punctuation

It can be difficult to determine how to punctuate a sentence heard over the phone or out of context, even for human transcriptionists. However, because we have a wider understanding of linguistic rules to work with, we can easily make educated guesses about where to put commas, periods, and semicolons and where to swap out a period for an exclamation mark, for example. A computer, meanwhile, can only attempt a verbatim transcription, which completely ignores punctuation within a sentence most of the time. What you’re left with is a mess of words separated by no more than a few sparse periods.

Filler Words and Offhand Sounds

These areother aspects of transcription that software fails to reliably account for. Filler words are commonly used unintentionally during the fluid speech, with the most easily explainable reason for their presence being a person struggling to reach for their next word. A program will not be able to distinguish that a person saying “what’s the word?” is actually trying to recall a word they can’t remember and will instead transcribe that phrase along with what was said previously. It sounds like “oh”s and “ah”s are just as difficult for computers to ignore, and they can make many initial drafts seem like gibberish to the intelligent reader. Characteristics of speech like a lisp or a stutter are no different from filler words and sounds. In fact, if anything, these are much worse, as they can affect even words the software would normally detect. Tweaking the software to work with these difficulties is often a very complicated process if it’s possible at all, and it might render the software incapable of recognizing normal speech.

Dialect, accents, and other intangible aspects of speech

While it may not have as much bearing on how a particular language is expressed in writing, locality does greatly affect the way we speak any given language. Differences in pronunciation and enunciation between two people within the same locality are often difficult, if not impossible, to account for, so a person speaking in a different dialect may as well be speaking a different language altogether. Creating software or training an AI agent to understand multiple dialects of the same language is harder than you might think. On some level, the software must determine which particular dialect is being spoken during the feature extraction process. The difficulty of this task is compounded when you have multiple speakers, especially speakers from diverse cultural backgrounds.

The need for edited transcriptions

Edited transcriptions are one possible solution to some of the problems relating to each of the previous aspects of translation. Instead of the verbatim transcription that software generates being the final product, a service provider will often offer some “post-processing” work, in the form of a human being going over the verbatim transcript and fixing minor errors, removing redundancies and filler, and generally improving its readability (by replacing incorrect homophones, for example). Since this involves essentially hiring a person to proofread a computer-generated translation, it eliminates the “automated” aspect of the process. Instead of using human effort to counter the weaknesses of a computer system (and still arrive at a final product that doesn’t meet the same standards as a professional transcription), why not replace the software application with human effort entirely? This is not to say that software-generated recordings don’t have their own audience. For some purposes, such as voicemail recordings and general surveillance, automated speech recognition makes perfect sense. In these cases, minor transcription errors can be overlooked in light of the cost-saving that ASR offers. This is also ASR’s greatest saving grace for applications where the volume of incoming data is far too high for a human transcription to be viable. In cases where high volumes and time-sensitivity factors are considered, edited documents offer the greatest compromise between ASR (which wouldn’t be accurate enough on its own) and professional transcription (which wouldn’t be as cost-effective. For more sensitive applications, especially those in which the contents of a recording are of critical value or where the quality of recordings is inconsistent or cannot be guaranteed, a professionally transcribed document always manages to edge out a computer-generated one.

Hiring Professional Transcribers Vs. Speech Software

As research into natural language processing and speech recognition applications begin to bear greater fruit, we may eventually arrive at a focal point where computer-generated transcriptions are virtually indistinguishable from professionally transcribed ones. We’re definitely not there yet, though, and given the breadth of problems that computer scientists must tackle to achieve this, it’s safe to say we won’t be there any time soon. While software may achieve great results for extremely specialized applications, a general-use speech recognition software that can reliably get the job done, regardless of the scope of the task, simply doesn’t exist right now. That’s why we’d suggest that you always opt for professional transcription service over an automatically generated one, especially if you’re invested in maintaining the quality of your final product. Get in touch and let’s get your transcription project off the blocks right away. [post_title] => Why Hire Professional Transcribers Instead of Using Transcription Software [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => why-hire-professional-transcribers-instead-of-using-transcription-software [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-02 08:20:03 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-02 12:20:03 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2598 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [9] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2593 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-03 08:12:29 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-03 12:12:29 [post_content] => Eulogy speech writing Bereavement can be one of the most difficult aspects of life to cope with. Loved ones inevitably pass on, but writing a eulogy speech that does justice to the loss you feel is one of the hardest things you’ll ever have to do. If you (or someone you know) have lost someone recently, then you’ll know the feeling of disbelief that comes with such an event. That, and the whirlwind of emotions that goes along with it, is enough to deal with on its own. Yet with every passing, those left behind are entrusted with one fundamental task by the recently deceased: to live on. The first step towards a continued life is to put those who are gone to rest.

Eulogy Speeches – Reminding Ourselves that We Grieve Together

For the sake of formality, let us start by taking a look at the definition of a eulogy. A eulogy is a speech given during a funeral as a tribute to the recently deceased – one that recounts moments shared with them, as well as bits and pieces of what you’ll remember them most fondly for. It’s considered an honor to be asked to give a eulogy for someone you knew, as it tends to show just how great a part you played in their lives, and how great a part they played in yours. A eulogy can present itself as a very tricky task, especially given the breadth of what it aims to achieve, as well as the gravity of the situation. You’re not just saying good bye to someone who was a close companion in one way or another, you’re also addressing a gathering of people who are similarly bereaved and grieving with you. When you speak, you are speaking as the singular voice that ushers that lost loved one to the great beyond – your words forming the ending note in the final chapter of their lives. You speak on the behalf of everyone who grieves with you, and sometimes on the behalf of the deceased themselves. The aim is to say good bye in a way that respects the time you spent together, and steels everyone in preparation for times to come. Naturally, this is quite the responsibility, and most of the time, the person taking it on is one of the people who are most affected by the loss. Most people will not give many eulogies over the course of their lives, which means advice (at least advice that is based on experience) will be hard to come by, and undoubtedly very difficult to ask for. Moreover, every person is different, meaning every eulogy is different, and different people will approach the task in very unique ways. There are some key considerations, however, that remain common throughout parting addresses, and knowing these can help you figure out how you want to word and deliver your own piece. To start off…

Tips for Writing a Touching Eulogy Speech

We mentioned this in passing earlier, but it deserves an explicit mention: There’s no such thing as a clinical approach to eulogy writing. You can seek inspiration wherever you might find it, but always remember that the person you’re writing about, and the assembly you’re speaking to, are both entirely unique to your situation. As such, adopting a formulaic approach to speech writing can take away from the essence of what a eulogy aims to achieve. You want your eulogy to be guided by a respect for your feelings, and the feelings of the people you’re addressing; and not by a desire to check the boxes for what makes a complete speech.

1.    Remember to Talk to Other People Who Were Close to the Deceased

This is also critical, and applies even more so when you’ve been asked to deliver the eulogy by someone who, in your mind, was closer to the deceased than even you. You should make sure that your address is not focused exclusively on moments you shared with the dearly departed, without giving room for other people in the assembly to connect to it. Remember, the purpose of a eulogy is twofold – you’re honoring a lost loved one and acknowledging their loss, while also attempting to make the process of bearing that loss easier on those around you. Make sure your own stories are interspersed with mentions of other people who are present, if not their stories as well. Being included in the process of informing your eulogy helps people feel less isolated in their grief, which in turn makes grieving a less difficult ordeal. Also, while you had your own unique connection to the deceased, so did many of those around you at the time you’re delivering your address; it’s important that you acknowledge those connections when you’re speaking to everyone.

2.    Decide on a Structure for Your Funeral Speech

There’re two basic approaches to how you can structure a eulogy, you can either follow a chronology, or a mood board.

Chronology-based eulogy

It will focus on outlining a timeline of events in the deceased’s life, from when and where they were born to the circumstances of their eventual passing. A life is a very long ordeal to sum up in just a few minutes though, so write down significant events you want to mention before you actually write your piece so that you don’t forget to mention something that shouldn’t have been omitted. Significant events can be anything including a marriage or a fateful encounter with a significant other, the birth of a child, service in the military, etc. Once you’ve written your speech around these events, you can include a brief paragraph that summarizes the different ways in which the deceased managed to enrich the lives of those around them.

Mood boards

These are slightly different. Instead of focusing on a series of events in chronological order, you group anecdotes or significant encounters into different segments depending on how they’d make the audience feel. The passing of a loved one is a decidedly somber and sorrowful occasion, but that doesn’t mean the tone of your eulogy has to be exclusively depressing throughout. For example, you could start with a note about the many hardships the person in question faced throughout their lives (sorrowful), and transition to how they managed to surmount all of those hardships (uplifting), and end on a comment about how the departed taught us to strive to achieve great things even in the face of overwhelming opposition (hopeful). If a particular negative section goes on a little too long, you could include a light-hearted anecdote or comment, especially if it is one that’s easy to associate with the memory of the deceased. Structuring your eulogy this way helps you find ways to incorporate elements of relief (such as humor) while still keeping the overall tone respectful, though it does require you to leverage your writing and speaking skills a bit more than a chronology. Speaking of which…

What Do You Say in a Eulogy - Pick Your Words Carefully

Keep in mind that the speech you’re writing is meant to be delivered at a funeral. Most of the time, that means no overly verbose phrases or flowery language, but you’ll know your own situation best. Keeping things as simple and colloquial as possible is usually a good thing; you want to think of the eulogy as a sort of monologue in a conversation between you and the assembly. However, it’s important to avoid getting too casual with your speech as well, at the risk of sounding crass or inconsiderate. Remember that there are others in the audience who’re facing this with you, and don’t say anything that might potentially offend someone’s sensibilities or cause them pain. This applies especially to the inclusion of humorous anecdotes; while these can provide some much-needed levity, they’re also just as likely to rub people the wrong way when executed poorly or inappropriately. Another aspect to “picking your words” is including bits and pieces of common and repeated phrases that people might’ve heard from the deceased. These can help lend emotional gravity to your writing, and make it easier for the assembly to connect to what you’re saying.

Make Sure Your Address Is Appropriate for your Station

A husband or wife delivering a eulogy in honor of their partner, or a child mourning a parent, can speak about just about any subject matter so long as they phrase it appropriately. However, these people may not always feel up to the task of delivering a speech, and may ask someone to step in for them. In cases like these, it is important to respect the difference in standing between the person delivering the speech and the person who asked them to deliver it. The same way, if you’ve been tasked with delivering a eulogy for a friend while their family are in attendance, it’s important that you don’t overstep and say things that upset the family.

Maintain a Positive Disposition (or as much of one as you can)

Once again, the passing of a loved one is a decidedly undesirable event. There’s no two ways to put it, and no way to spin it into a silver lining, that’s just how grief works. Always keep in mind that your eulogy’s main purpose is to help soothe the pain that the most important members of the assembly are feeling. This is why you should be extra mindful of these people and what they need to hear from you, both when you’re writing the eulogy and delivering it. With speech writing, it’s a matter of picking the exact right words and putting them in exactly the right place, while when speaking, it’s a matter of how you deliver those words. Especially when you’re covering subject matter that’s on the heavier side of things, you should be aware of the people around you and how your words are making them feel. Taking a moment to pause to collect yourself, or to give someone a kind look and a nod of reassurance, can go a long way towards helping them remain strong. Beyond this, it’s important to balance out the heavier, longer parts of your speech by having briefer, lighter anecdotes in between them. This helps make the speech less emotionally draining as a whole, both for you as a speaker, and everyone present in the assembly.

Don’t Feel Pressured

This applies especially to people who aren’t used to giving addresses, especially during difficult times. You might find yourself getting crushed under the weight of the immense responsibility that’s been placed on you. Nobody’s a “pro” at delivering eulogies, and even if experience were abundant (which it isn’t), no amount of practice can help prepare a person for events when they lose someone important to them.So if you find yourself getting emotional while writing your speech, or you feel like you can’t do justice to the task, be sure to remind yourself that you’re grieving too, and that nothing takes precedent over that. Focus on your emotions regarding the deceased, and try to use those emotions as the basis for your speech rather than adherence to a guide. Don’t try to seek out the perfect words, that’s not what a eulogy is for, and it could take you more time to find these words than you have on hand.

Eulogy Speech Writing Services Can Help Put Your Emotions into Words

We understand that grief is a slow, arduous process, and one that can’t be rushed. If you’re having a rough go at things in the wake of someone’s passing, we can help you find the right words, or at least a worthwhile substitute.

If you’d like to know more about our speech writing services, please give us a call at 1-877-897-1725 or start chatting with our representative today.

[post_title] => Writing a Touching Eulogy Speech for the Perfect Good Bye [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-a-touching-eulogy-speech-for-the-perfect-good-bye [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-08 07:07:01 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-08 11:07:01 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2593 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) ) [post_count] => 10 [current_post] => 4 [in_the_loop] => 1 [post] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2632 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content] => Tips for magazine article writing Do you wish to see your byline adorning the pages of your favorite publication? Do you want to build a reader base that awaits your next article with bated breath? Well, with a little bit of work, you can take your magazine article writing skills to the next level. The key to writing great magazine articles is to create content that engages from start to finish, and provides value to the reader. Regardless of which magazine you are aiming for, a few tips can help you master your craft and produce articles that any publication in the world would be proud to put out for you. However, before we delve into our tips on writing magazine articles, let's take a moment to understand how this particular form of writing differs from other online content writing.

Magazine Article Writing Vs. Other Forms of Writing

Writing an article for a magazine is not the same as writing one for a newspaper or an online directory. Moreover, the pieces you may see in a magazine are inherently different from the content you may find in journals and books as well. The tone and style of these articles vary with each publication, genre, and topic. However, two things set these pieces apart from other forms of writing – they allow more room for creativity and tend to be more visually appealing. While article writing and book writing also require creative input and critical thinking, drafting magazine articles allows you to play with different visual aspects. The use of colorful graphics and photographs to capture attention becomes a must. Furthermore, the length of magazine articles depends on the publication you’re writing for, what you're writing and who you're writing for. In most cases, writing content for the internet does not come with word count limitations. And insofar as books are concerned, you’re usually your own boss. But to give you an idea, an average magazine article can be anywhere between half a page to a dozen pages. Nonetheless, the word count for 12-page pieces is usually not as high as you'd think since they are interspersed with pictures and advertisements.

Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Connect

article writing Here are some tips on how to create magazine articles that will grab your readers' attention.

1. Write About Things You Are Interested In

You are more likely to create engaging content if you write about something you find intriguing or exciting. Your passion for a specific cause or topic will not only show in your work, but it will improve the quality of the output automatically. Articles written with passion are more likely to connect as they give readers a peek into your heart and soul. If you let your words reflect your love and devotion to the subject of your article, it will convince your readers to trust your judgment and authority. Magazine articles are an excellent medium for talented writers to showcase their skills while playing to their strengths. Moreover, publishers always prefer pieces that have an element of individuality. So, if you are particularly fond of something – be it music, traveling, cooking, or martial arts – make sure to use it as your calling card. However, just because you think you know a topic inside out doesn't mean you should cut corners while conducting research. It is essential to scour the internet and see what others are saying. Also, look for the latest stats and back up your claims with valuable insight.

2. Use Compelling Headings and Sub-Headings

Although this tip is not unique to magazine article writing, it requires a special mention. Your headline is the first thing a reader would see while browsing through the index of their favorite magazine or on the front page of their search engine. It is the focal point of your article, as it draws your readers' attention and encourages them to click on it. Many experts compare a well-crafted headline to a beautiful wrapping paper. However, in reality, it is a gift itself. An excellent headline, paired with equally compelling subheadings, will build the interest of your readers. Therefore, you should put in extra effort to create headlines that perfectly capture the essence of your article without giving everything away. Just make sure they are not misleading. It is also a good practice to include your main keyword in the main heading to make your post easy to discover. We'll discuss more on this later.

3. Reel In the Audience with a Unique Angle

One of the best ways to make your magazine article appealing is by ensuring it has a unique perspective. Start by creating a profile for your target audience and figure out where their interests lie. You can also look at the articles published by your competitors and industry giants. Doing so will help you determine which angles have been discussed before and which require more exploration. Instead of just scratching the surface, dig a little deeper and discover fresh viewpoints that establish you as an expert in the field. Even if you are writing on a mainstream topic, such as a new superhero movie that has recently hit the theatres, focus on the aspects that others have not bothered to explore. Remember, creating value-added content will keep your readers engaged and the publisher happy.

4. Keep It Short, Sweet, and To the Point

Brevity is the soul of any well-written content. If you want your magazine article to remain engaging from the first sentence to the last, you must make it easy to read and understand. It is generally good to use short and simple sentences. You should break your information into small chunks without leaving any room for ambiguity. Of course, depending on the nature of your article, you may have to use a few complex sentences. However, using too many complicated terms and long sentences can distract the readers. Moreover, make sure your readers can follow your train of thought without making much effort. Set the pace to match the article's tone, and don't let your message get lost between long sentences. If your audience finds your magazine article writing skills tedious or frustrating, there is a good chance they won't come back for more. Apart from using short and concise sentences, ensure your paragraphs don't exceed six lines. Adding bulleted lists to your content can also make it easy to skim and comprehend, attracting the readers.

5. Include Visual Elements

Break up huge chunks of text with striking pictures, powerful graphics, and well-explained charts. Including valuable visual elements in your magazine article is a foolproof way to increase audience engagement. They will give your audience a chance to rest their eyes without taking their attention away from the piece. With the right images, you can explain your idea or perspective without saying a lot. Additionally, photos and videos can make your content more memorable. They can help your readers interact with the piece, which may also increase their willingness to return to it. These are among the leading reasons why most publishers and brand owners invest extensively on graphic work to support their written content. How to write articles for magazines

6. Get Your Audience Involved and Invested

Starting your magazine article with a thought-provoking question or a shocking fact can help you grab the interest of your audience from the get-go. If your question is something that your readers can relate to personally, it will undoubtedly compel them to read further. However, to draw the attention of your readers, you must understand their desires and pain points. You should also know about your audience's gender, age, and location to choose your article's right style and tone. After all, the ideas that may intrigue women aged 30 to 45 are not likely to resonate with men aged 50 to 65. Furthermore, always address your readers directly. Writing in the second person will allow you to use words such as "you,” "your," and "yours." Your readers should feel as if you have written the article just for them. Once they build that connection, they'll stay hooked until the very last page. Also, make your piece sound like a discussion one would have with their friend. It shouldn't come across as a lesson or an essay. This magazine article writing tip will surely help your audience feel like a part of the narrative.

7. Don't State Facts, Tell a Story

Storytelling is an art. While anyone can share factual information, it takes expertise and a unique thought process to tell a story. As a writer, your biggest priority should be keeping your readers on their toes as they take in your words and build a world of their own. Whether you are writing about politics or deep-sea diving, your anecdotes and experiences can set your article apart from the rest. Sharing small stories also allows your audience to connect with you on an emotional level. It makes you and your words more relatable. People may not remember the statistics you've shared in your article. But they are most likely to remember the tidbits from your personal life that made their way onto the page. To create compelling content, take inspiration from your past experiences or create fictitious scenarios to leave your audience spellbound. You can also use analogies, quotes, and pop culture references to breathe a new life into your content.

8. Choose Your Keywords Wisely

Magazines are no longer limited to the print medium. You can now access almost every magazine online, with some charging a small subscription fee and others allowing you to read their content for free. Now, you may have heard that we should write for people and not the search engines. Our question is, why not write for both? Creating compelling and engaging content is just not enough. You also need to make your articles discoverable. Search engine optimization or SEO is the most effective way to make sure your audience finds your posts. You need tofind out what people are looking for and incorporate those keywords into your article. According to the SEO best practices, your main keyword should appear at the article's beginning, middle, and end. You can also include two to three additional keywords throughout the content. It will increase the chances of your article ranking higher on Google.

9. Wrap It Up Nicely

Don't let your closing statement go to waste. As you wrap up your article, utilize the last few lines to include a CTA call to action. It is essentially a way for you to tell your readers what to do next. Whether you are looking for feedback or want your audience to check out your latest video series, make sure to include a relevant link that directs them to your preferred webpage or service. The next step is to edit your content. You can use services such as Grammarly or Copyscape to ensure your article is free of mistakes and plagiarism. This is also your last opportunity to format the piece and ensure no negative spaces or weird indentations. Moreover, please use different font sizes for headings, subheadings, and body to increase readability and engagement. You can also use bold words and italicized sentences to make your critical ideas more prominent.

Magazine Article Writing Made Easy

To conclude, there are no set rules to writing a compelling magazine article. However, the tips mentioned above will enable you to break the mold by producing great content. A wisely chosen topic with a unique perspective and great headline can do wonders for your career. Similarly, short and clear sentences sprinkled with personal anecdotes can make your article more fun to read. If you feel a little lost in how to do go it alone, our article writing service could be the order of the day. Our team of experienced article writers ably supported by our team of expert designers can help you create magazine articles that hit the right note every time. [post_title] => 9 Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Hook Readers from Start to Finish [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 9-tips-for-writing-magazine-articles-that-hook-readers-from-start-to-finish [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2632 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [comment_count] => 0 [current_comment] => -1 [found_posts] => 135 [max_num_pages] => 14 [max_num_comment_pages] => 0 [is_single] => [is_preview] => [is_page] => [is_archive] => [is_date] => [is_year] => [is_month] => [is_day] => [is_time] => [is_author] => [is_category] => [is_tag] => [is_tax] => [is_search] => [is_feed] => [is_comment_feed] => [is_trackback] => [is_home] => 1 [is_privacy_policy] => [is_404] => [is_embed] => [is_paged] => 1 [is_admin] => [is_attachment] => [is_singular] => [is_robots] => [is_favicon] => [is_posts_page] => [is_post_type_archive] => [query_vars_hash:WP_Query:private] => afb69197a93a4f2cdd3e4767a2345262 [query_vars_changed:WP_Query:private] => [thumbnails_cached] => [stopwords:WP_Query:private] => [compat_fields:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => query_vars_hash [1] => query_vars_changed ) [compat_methods:WP_Query:private] => Array ( [0] => init_query_flags [1] => parse_tax_query ) )
Tips for Writing Engaging Magazine Articles feature

9 Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Hook Readers from Start to Finish

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                    [post_content] => Content writing topics

Are you at a loss for content writing topics for your blog? There are plenty of evergreen topics that suit just about any blog. Read on to find out.

1. Advice and Opinion Pieces

Life advice can be a great way to drive readership up, especially if you've cultivated a following based on opinion pieces. Posts like these give you a chance to form an intimate connection with your readers by providing solutions to their problems. You could talk about anything that relates to your niche. The best thing about advice is that it doesn't require much substantiation, so instead of backing everything up with data, you just have to sit down and think with an open mind. The second best thing, meanwhile, is that advice like this doesn't get old, especially if you’re coming from a place of authority. While things of a time-sensitive nature, such as tech reviews and current events, get dated quickly, the way life works changes very slowly in comparison. So while a two-year-old review of a phone won't be relevant at all anymore, life advice from six years ago will be worth just as much to one of your newer readers.

2. Anecdotal Topics, Drawing from Personal Experience

Similarly to the previous entry, this one relies on the social capital that people associate with your brand name. They'll want to know what you've been doing with your life and the things that have helped shape you into who you are now. Writing about anecdotes from your life allows you to turn journal entries into blog posts. You don't have to read anything, you don't have to premeditate too much either. You just think of an event and let the words go flow. As with life advice, posts like these allow you to develop your writing style, adding and subtracting traits that will eventually help your readers truly identify with that style and brand voice. Since you're also talking about your own experiences here, you're also getting the chance to strike a chord with your audience in a way that few other things can. Giving people a window into yourself helps them connect to your writing, perhaps even relate to it, which is a great way to ensure that they keep coming back to your site for more. Again, because this event is specific to you, the written content will be too, and you don't have to worry about putting your own spin on things or trying to distinguish yourself from everyone else out there. It just comes with the territory by default. Your content writing efforts won't ever get dated because it's an event from your life, and your take on it. As long as you're smart about how you leverage your opinion for your specific audience, people will always be able to find worth in the post, even if the event itself becomes obscure overtime. If you've got the perfect anecdote, but you just can't find the right words to do justice to it, consider tagging us in. Our blog writers have helped many prominent bloggers structure their content to deliver the best possible experience to their readers while also staying true to the essence of the event

3. Focus on Local Events and Attractions

writing about local events If your business has a local element to it, whereby you’re providing services within a geographical area, covering local events or places is a great way to engage potential customers. Every big city's got its own highlights, and you can take a visit to any easily identifiable hotspot and write about it to let your audience know what it's like and what you thought of it. Bonus points if the attraction you're discussing is unique to your locality. If you don't live in a big city and there's not much going on around your town, you can instead foucs on an event and subsequently pivot to a conversation about what’s happening where you are. If you're an avid traveler, blogging about the destinations, your visit, and the attractions within those destinations can be a great source of fresh content - especially if you can adequately capture the essence of that experience and explain it through your words. People are all about secondhand experiences – some might say a desire to live vicariously through others is what got blogging to really take off in the first place.

4. Write About Prevailing Social Issues

This is another type of opinion piece, but it deserves its own entry because it doesn't fall into any other categories. You can write about what you consider an "issue of our time", like climate change, problems relating to modernization and modernized societies, income and gender disparity, and many others. You can pick up any one of these issues and try to paint a clearer picture of them for your audience while also giving your own opinion as well. Tread the line carefully, though. Some topics can carry social importance, so adopting too radical a view may alienate some members of your audience. There's one of two ways to tackle such cases. Its best to adopt a more neutral standpoint that outlines mainstream arguments on either side, but you can also adopt a more candid approach. At the end of the day, it's all about the kind of persona you've built through your blog and how you wish to express yourself. Hot topics do draw big crowds, and your content writing will do well to tap into this.

5. Discuss the Journey of Learning a Particular Skill

blog writing about learning craftsmanship Some businesses, particularly those that have to do with craftsmanship, can use their blog posts to discuss the journey one of their talented professionals took in the pursuit of their craft. If you're a digital agency, you could have a piece written about one of your most senior graphic designers. If you're an independent blogger, you could write about a skill you'd learnt personally. Talk about what motivated you to start, how you developed that interest, and how much you've learnt up till now. Insightful, informative topics covered in a manner that serves to educate your audience are the perfect way for a blog to put out content that helps enrich an audience member's life. That's attention captured, and a reader who'll be returning to your blog to check up on updates in the future. Granted, the journey of learning the skill, or the expertise that goes into providing a particular skill, may become outdated overtime. If it does, you can discussthe evolution of your own craft and the differences between then and now.

6. Write a Fictional Anecdote

Generally, a blog is not fictitious. If anything, a blog is as far removed from fiction as it could be, since blogs deal with aspects of day-to-day life, experience-based accounts from real people. However, a great way to illustrate some abstract point, or demonstrate perspective, is to use a fictional event as the vehicle for it. A narrative is a great way to get readers hooked, and a fictional one is all the better. Rather than typing out your views, why not spin a story between two invented characters that sheds light on the merits of those views. This type of piece might suit some blogs better than others. Depending on how much you enjoy fiction, you could even make a fictional anecdote a regular part of your weekly or monthly offering. Even commercial websites could have a weekly section where the company mascot discusses the latest additions to their product catalogue.

7. Revisit Past Posts That Were Popular

Value added content When you've constantly been churning out content, you've likely revisited the same subject multiple times. Even if yours is a general-purpose blog that, for example, regularly comes up with lists of popular products in different eCommerce marketplaces. Any blog will have callbacks to content that was published earlier. By discussing pieces that received a lot of attention when they were first published, you let newer members of your audience know what they had to offer. In doing so, you're also allowing yourself to hook them with any one of your most popular titles. This strategy lets you capitalize on things that have already worked for you, is what we're saying. But it's about more than just that. If you're talking about technical content, a review of a past article could very well span an article in itself. You could discuss developments since the previous piece was written and address the technical shortcomings of the previous content. In doing so, you show your audience just how dedicated you are to your particular domain and also the depth of your knowledge within that domain. Based on our years of experience writing listicles for various blogs in various domains, we can tell you that a list of the best articles from the past year can be a great way to wrap up a year of great content, and it might just end up being your most popular piece to start off the next. If you'd like, we could even write it for you.

8. Share Your Opinion On Another Person's Opinion (or a Fresh Development).

Pieces like these are great for both establishing the personality of your brand as well as capitalizing on what's already been put out there. Don't forget to take advantage of what we call the trickle-down effect of popular content. If any popular content creator, policymaker, or celebrity comes out with an opinion that gets people talking, you can discuss those opinions for some pretty relevant press. Speaking of relevance, it plays a key role in driving the popularity of such a post. You've got to have a finger on the pulseof current affairs to benefit from pieces like these the most since they tend to have a very short period between having nothing out there regarding the event and being completely saturated with very similar content. For someone running a blog on politics, this can mean competing with other prominent politics and news blogs to be the first on the scene. If you feel up to it, you can even use articles like these to respond to the opinions discussed in the media you're covering. You let your audience know your take on a particular topic, ensuring that everything you're releasing yourself is wholly original. The best part is that in today's day and age, there's a lot of newsworthy developments constantly occurring, so you're not strapped for source material in the slightest. Of course, when you're covering something that's very recent, you can't really predict how much public interest a story will attract. Try to look for big names or popular people. If you're writing a finance blog,you can definitely do a piece on Apple CEO Tim Cook's new salary package and discuss developments in the company (and improvements in profit) since he took the helm.

To Conclude

That was our list of 8 timeless content writing topics. If you'd like to know more about value-added content, find out here. If you'd like to know more about our services and how we can help you revamp your content portfolio, click here to send in an inquiry.

Are your listicles not getting enough traffic?

Let our team of article writers create content that gets your results. [rfp_banner_form formnum="1"]
[post_title] => 8 Timeless Content Writing Topics for Your Blog [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 8-timeless-content-writing-topics-for-your-blog [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 11:06:29 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 15:06:29 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2656 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [1] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2646 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-25 09:41:52 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-25 13:41:52 [post_content] => Rules for writing great articles Writing great articles is not a skill you can learn overnight. It may not be something you are born with, but it is definitely something you can master by putting in the hard work. It takes writers years to hone their craft, and even then, they cannot achieve perfection. In fact, it won't be wrong to say there is no such thing as perfect writing. Everyone has a unique way of expressing their thoughts and beliefs. What matters is how their words resonate with others. A good article can educate people about a new idea, whereas a great article can change minds and encourage people to take action. Whether it is something as simple as clicking on a link and making a purchase or something as complex as adopting a new lifestyle, powerful writing carries a lot of weight and is worthy of respect. If you are looking to improve your article writing skills, learning these rules can be a valuable addition to your arsenal.

Rule 1: Know Your Target Audience

Before you put pen to paper – figuratively, of course – you should ask yourself who you're writing for. Now, most people will say they write for themselves. This is often the correct answer because we're our own biggest critics. Nevertheless, whether you are writing an article for affiliate marketing or working on a magazine article, the first thing you need to do is determine your audience. If you write for a pharmaceutical company or a law firm, you must already have a clear idea of who will be reading your copy. However, if you are an employee at a content marketing firm or work as a freelancer, you may have to do a little research to create a reader profile. It will help you understand their interests and motivation to click on your post. You can start by asking yourself the following questions:
  • Who will read this article?
  • Why would they read this article?
  • What will this article do for them?
Once you have found the answer to these queries, you can get a step closer to writing great articles. Try and learn about the factors that may excite your readers and the things that may not sit well with them. Doing so will help you figure out how you can get your audience to see your point of view or buy what you're selling. However, if you want to grow as a writer, don't limit yourself to an ideal audience. Think about other people who may find your article exciting or may connect with it on an emotional level.

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Let our team of article writers create content that gets your results. [rfp_banner_form formnum="1"]

Rule 2: Research, Research, Research

It is always a good idea to write on topics you are passionate about. Be it your love for abstract art or your interest in marine biology, try writing about things that bring you joy. Alternatively, if you have a strong but unfavorable opinion about something, your personal feelings will undoubtedly add some substance to your writing – as long as you don't make your post sound too biased. However, no matter how much you know about a particular idea, make sure to conduct in-depth research before creating an outline for your piece. Read as much as you can. Learn about the history and background of the topic and how others around the world may have perceived it. Many writers allot a specific time frame for their research. In theory, it may work. But depending on what you're writing and who you're writing for, it may not be a good idea to limit your research process to a few minutes. In addition, don't cut any corners. Poor research is among the leading reasons most articles fall flat. On the other hand, good research helps us build our knowledge and facilitates learning. It also makes us more confident in our writing while nourishing our minds. Your research can make or break the article. If you want your words to make an impact, back up your arguments with facts and figures.

Rule 3: Grab the Reader's Interest

Once a person clicks on your article, you merely have seconds to make an impression. Since your title is the first thing a reader sees after opening your post, you must take extra care to make it compelling and interesting. Ideally, your main heading should convey what your article is about without divulging too much. Sound confusing? Well, your title should be an accurate representation of what the reader will find in the content body. However, it should also create an aura of mystique without being misleading. The next thing you should write a short and concise introductory paragraph to draw in your readers. A large chunk of text right at the beginning of an article may distract the reader. Worst case scenario, it may even stop them from reading any further. Therefore, it is pertinent to keep your opening short and attention-grabbing. It doesn't have to be something extraordinary. But it should at least capture the interest of your audience and encourage them to read what you have to say. Consider keeping your intro limited to two or three short sentences. It can even be a one-liner, depending on how well you can craft it. If your words are easy to scan and provide value, there is a good chance your reader will also make an effort to explore the article. Tips for writing articles

Rule 4: Make Your Article Visually Appealing

One of the most significant rules of writing great articles is making them visually appealing. You can create an element of interest by adding stunning photos and informative videos to your content. Moreover, try to incorporate well-explained charts and intriguing infographics wherever you can in your post. Also, if you come across a graphic that is relevant to your article but seems complex, consider taking some time to explain it to your audience patiently. You can also create customized images to make your piece look more professional. It will also help break up the bulky wall of text. Most brands invest extensively to procure graphic designers to develop valuable marketing content. Another way to make your article more attractive is by writing shorter paragraphs. Negative space in between the short paragraphs can help break the visual clutter. It allows your audience to read and digest each point before moving on to the next one. Here are some more ways you can make your pieces more reader-friendly.
  • Cascading subheadings
  • Bold and italicized words
  • Hyperlinks
  • Bullet points
  • Embeds
These factors will breathe a new life into your articles and motivate your readers to spend more time on them. Also, once you are done with writing articles, don't forget to edit and proofread them. Our years of experience in this field have made us pros at writing content for your site. For more information, please feel free to give us a call.

Rule 5: Add Substance to Your Articles

How many times have you found an article on your newsfeed that had a fantastic title but didn't have any substance? Unfortunately, it happens a lot. These click-bait articles are usually packaged as something worthwhile. However, they rarely tell you anything new or valuable. Although these posts manage to fulfil their target by getting more clicks, they leave the readers frustrated and unsatisfied – which is the exact opposite of what you should aim for. After all, one of the most important rulesforwriting great articles is never to leave the reader dissatisfied or craving more. If you want to improve your article writing skills, aim to add value to your words. It should provide new information or a fresh perspective by viewing the topic from a unique angle. Instead of barely scratching the surface, take a deep dive into the subject and look for ideas that require a detailed and nuanced discussion. Your content should solve problems and present solutions. It should connect with people on a deeper level and stimulate their imagination. Creating value-added content will encourage your readers to visit your piece over and over again. Meanwhile, a shallow article may stop them from ever making that effort again. Moreover, if you have a strong opinion, don't be afraid to share it with the world. However, please keep yourself open to criticism and be gracious with the feedback you receive. After all, your readers have a right to agree or disagree with your words.

Rule 6: Don't Water Down Your Words

Want to write with conviction? Don't let your fears hold you back. More often than not, the fear of judgment and criticism refrain writers from reaching their full potential. It is easy to develop a mindset where you don't want to displease your editor or write something that your audience may not fully agree with. As a result, you start using soft language and adopt a pacifying tone. In some instances, it might work in your favor. However, in most cases, it makes your writing look watered down and ineffective. Your message may even get lost in translation if you spend too much energy on creating a perfect post that keeps everyone happy. Therefore, the next time you write an article and have the nagging fear of "what if they don't like it," please immediately push aside those negative thoughts. While it is essential to make sure your words don't spread misinformation, you must not let the fear of disagreement hold you captive. If you believe in a specific cause or an idea, write about it without entertaining any second thoughts. You can't please everyone. It would help if you accepted that there would be times when your message will not resonate with the readers, and that's completely fine. Receiving a negative comment or a harsh criticism may put you in a bad mood for a few hours. But don't let it stop you from writing articles that can add value.

Summing Up the Rules for Writing Great Articles

Writers never stop learning and growing. Hence there is no set formula that will enable you to produce brilliant content. Nevertheless, a few important rules of writing articles can set you on a path to success and help you create content that will stand the test of time. The rules include learning about your target audience, conducting in-depth research, and reeling in the reader with your compelling headline. Moreover, your article must have bullet points, images, graphics, and other visual elements to increase reader engagement. You can also add substance to your articles by asking the right questions and providing the readers with the correct answers. In addition, make sure you write with conviction and never water down your words due to fear of criticism. If you are interested in our article writing service, please drop us an email today. Our talented writers are experienced in all niches and can help you grow your business and reach a larger market segment. [post_title] => 6 Rules for Writing Great Articles [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 6-rules-for-writing-great-articles [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-20 10:16:46 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-20 14:16:46 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2646 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [2] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2643 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-19 08:57:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-19 12:57:30 [post_content] => White Paper writing What is a white paper, and why has this inbound marketing channel become such a key part of online marketing strategies for businesses. Well for one, it is a deep-dive form of content that makes use of reliable resources and case studies with the purpose to educate readers regarding a particular topic. Such content pieces are great for businesses to present themselves as leading experts in their fields and attract other experts and customers to their products or services. Writing and formatting a white paper is in many ways similar to writing an eBook, with the only difference being that whitepaper writing requires a lot more research and knowledge on the given subject. Whitepaper writing requires dedication and a commitment to producing content that is unparalleled. Doing this in one day is a Herculean task best left to experts. This is where our white paper writing service comes in. With a team of expert white paper writers with diverse expertise, you can rest assured; we’ll deliver well above expectations.

Writing a White Paper Quickly

White paper writing 2 The initial part is the hardest mainly because of a load of information at your disposal. Getting lost in this information is highly likely and presenting findings and data without following a narrative is even more so. Luckily, with our tips and tricks, you’ll find the going easier.

1. Topic Selection

When it comes to topic selection, writing on any industry-relevant subject is not a good idea. You need to understand what your audience will connect with the most and how your qualifications come into play. Additionally, it would also help if you chose a topic that was only briefly covered by others. You can also network with experts within your organization or use other crowdsourcing techniques to have a better command of the subject. If you want your paper to get featured on other websites or SERPs, you should focus on creating a unique paper and filling a gap within the content already available. One great way to select a topic is by starting an online poll. Polls will help you get an idea of what your readers are interested in while also getting them excited for an upcoming paper.

2. Target Audience

Your target audience will determine the kind of tone, voice, and research that will be required for the paper. For example, if the purpose of your paper is to attract B2B customers, then perhaps adding technical jargon will not be a problem. However, if your target audience is not well-versed in the subject, you may need to take a different approach. Additionally, you should also focus on relevant keywords and the platforms where the audience will read your content. Choosing specific platforms will also help later on when you’re outlining and formatting the paper.

3. Intro and Conclusion

Why should your readers get excited about reading the paper? The introduction should include a brief description of what the paper includes and why readers will benefit from it. Most readers decide whether they’ll read an entire paper after reading the introduction. So, make sure to grab their attention and tell them why they should continue reading. Address the value of information and the benefits of your paper early on. The conclusion will help readers make a final decision about the entire paper. This section is where you can market the company’s products or services and persuade the audience to take a specific action. Adding business details and a CTA is best left for the outro of the paper.

4. Useful Information

You might see a paper as a perfect opportunity to promote your business and its products or services. However, it'll be best not to forget that the whitepaper's main purpose is to provide useful information and increase your readers’ knowledge. Additionally, this is also your chance to present yourself as a trustworthy industry leader, and a salesy paper will not be sufficient to do that. Use reliable sources, data, and stats and provide expert opinions on them instead of mere advertisements.

5. Keep Building on First Draft

You should draft several copies of the paper down the line to ensure no useful information was left out. You can keep updating the white paper and improving on it even after the first draft is out. One great way to do this is to write several copies and take a fresh outlook each time. You can also have other experts or professionals within the organization give it a read to spot any errors in the document.

6. Grabbing the Readers’ Attention

The technicalities and formalities included in writing a paper can make the tone of it extremely dull. However, instead of focusing on numbers and statistics, you should try adding more value with a perfectly flowing conversation. Keeping your readers’ attention from beginning till the end in a detailed and thorough paper might be difficult. However, as long as you follow the above-mentioned tips, you’ll be able to write a compelling copy.

Formatting a Whitepaper

Formatting a whitepaper When you’re formatting a whitepaper, you should remember to include an easy-to-read and clear title page. The title page will include the subject of the paper, names of experts who have helped create the document, publication date, and author name[s]. You should also divide your paper into headings, subheadings, and sections. This will help you keep your paper organized and provide a better reading experience. Typically, H1 and H2 headings are used in a paper for headings and subheadings, respectively. It’s also pertinent to note that not all pages of your paper need to be text-heavy. You can present highlights, critical details, and takeaways in a separate section of the document. Using colours will also help readers to find important chunks of information. However, remember not to use red, as red is mostly associated with edits in a file. Easy one-pages can also be used for a summary of the text-heavy sections of your paper. Finally, you should also ensure that your paper feels and looks consistent throughout. Typography, colours, and visuals will play an important role in shaping the readers' experience, so it’s also important to give special attention to such elements. The following are some important sections of a typical white paper:
  • Title
  • Abstract
  • Problem statement
  • Background
  • Solution
  • Conclusion
  • References

White Paper Mistakes to Avoid

Whitepaper mistakes to avoid Since white paper includes a lot of research and analysis, it’s always important to keep in mind the mistakes you’re likely to make and should avoid. Keeping this list in front of you will help you focus on the proper direction for the paper while avoiding mistakes that can lead to a poor reading experience for your audience. Let’s take a look at some common paper writing mistakes you should avoid at all costs:
  • Not conducting adequate research.
  • Making it sound like a sales pitch.
  • Not following a narrative or a story.
  • Creating a bad design for the paper.
  • Not providing relevant examples or supporting your arguments.
  • Making last-minute changes.

Types of Whitepapers for Businesses

Contrary to popular belief, this type of content writing is not new. The term was first used in 1922, when the British Government published the Churchill White Paper of 1922. A white paper, if well-written- will give your company a competitive edge and present you with an opportunity to influence readers to pick a particular solution for an existing problem in your industry. White papers are a great way to steer the decision-making process of your current or potential customers in a way that’s beneficial to the business. There are several types of white papers companies can use. Let's take a look at the six most popular styles:

1. Educational

As the name suggests, this white paper is used to inform and educate readers regarding a specific topic in a particular industry. The core function of this content is to provide valuable information and answers to the questions that a company’s customers and prospective customers might have. The focus of this is to teach customers what they don’t already know and present a guide. You can use inbound marketing tactics and write how-to’s or give an in-depth analysis of a new industry or technology when writing an educational white paper.

2. Problem Solving

A problem-solving white paper requires persuasive writing techniques, credible sources, and a mature tone. You should think outside the box to present solutions to a problem your customers might have. Of course, the purpose of this type of white paper is to push out your products and services in a subtle manner. However, in doing that, you should focus on presenting unique ideas and steps to solve a particular problem. Think of the solutions that already exist and how you can cater to the same problems with a different approach. Problem-solving whitepapers are also great for sharing company values and beliefs.

3. Technical

A technical white paper provides technical details about an industry, products, services, or technology. You can offer details of your particular products and how to use them in this document. To strengthen the credibility of your technical white paper, you can also present some visuals and case studies. Typically, the purpose of this document is to attract technical buyers to your particular product or service. Your focus should be on your audience and making the copy error-free, concise, and easy to comprehend.

4. Market Research

A whitepaper based on market research includes an executive summary that highlights important data and provides a professional analysis of it. This document typically includes a lot of graphs and interesting analyses or arguments. Such white papers are excellent for PR, and they can either present trends, highlights, and findings or an argument based on the data presented. You can evaluate recent updates on a particular topic in your industry and present interpretations or predictions based on them.

5. Visionary

Typically used by technology-based companies, this type of white paper shows a reader why a particular business is trustworthy and best for long-term partnerships. This document gives innovative insights and provides arguments for why some products or services will never become outdated. You can also use this copy to showcase the visionary experts who work at your organization.

6. Knowledge Papers

Used for both ATL and BTL campaigns, these papers include a debate-style writing technique that puts you in a credible, authoritative, and visionary position. You can choose to address an existing industry debate or create a new one. However, the focus of this paper will be to make your readers listen, thus making persuasion a critical part of it.

Do You Need Help Creating a Whitepaper for Your Business?

We have several years of experience and a proven track record of customer satisfaction when it comes to creating compelling whitepaper copies for businesses. We provide 100% original content, accommodation for urgent requests, proofreading and editing services, unlimited revisions, 24-hour customer support, and ghost-written copies for all our clients. So, if you’re on the lookout for experts in business, technology, hybrid, or product comparison-related white paper writing services, contact us now by calling (877) 897-1725. [post_title] => Writing and Formatting a White Paper Fast [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => writing-and-formatting-a-white-paper-fast [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 09:03:27 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 13:03:27 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2643 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [3] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2636 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-10-14 08:50:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-14 12:50:30 [post_content] => Title capitalization There are varying and often confusing rules to the use of the English language and none so much as title capitalization. With a language that's so pervasive and commonly used, you're bound to find different schools of thought that define the rules in their own way. When it comes to print media and even forms of online written content, the rules can get even more difficult to ascertain. Specifically, when you talk about writing an article, book or even a social media post – thes rules can get very detailed and all the more elusive. There is an abundance of different style guides out there, and even veteran writers can find themselves making mistakes every now and again. If you've found yourself stumped on your journey towards creating exceptional online content, this guide is for you.

Simple Rules for Title Capitalization

Before we can get into the exact nuances that matter with each style, let's look at the things that most styles have in common. To start off…

Always Capitalize the First and Last Words

Let's start with a fairly straightforward rule. Always capitalize the first and last word of your title, regardless of what those words are. For example: Incorrect: "tips to capitalizing titles" Correct: "Tips to Capitalizing Titles"

Always Capitalize oYur Nouns

While the jury might be out on other parts of speech, all of your mainstream style guides agree that nouns are of great importance in a title. A noun is defined as a word that identifies a class of objectsor a specific instance of that class, where the object in question can be any place, animal, or thing (real or abstract). Common nouns deal with class identifiers, while proper nouns deal with instances. Consider the following sentence: "Hello, my name is Jim." Now it's easy to tell that the word "Jim" carries importance here since it contributes heavily to the sentences communicated. So is the word "name", since it determines what the word "Jim" defines. In this case, "Jim" is an example of a proper noun, while "name" is a common noun, and when you're writing in prose or paragraphs, the rules state that you're only supposed to capitalize proper nouns, while common nouns are left in lower case unless they're starting off a sentence. Titles, however, are different. If there was a title in our sentence, the word "name" would also be capitalized, regardless of whichever style you're using. Pronouns are the same; you shouldn't write words like "I", "You", "We", or "Us" without capitalizing them. Common and proper nouns are both categories of principle words, as are pronouns, so you shouldn't usually leave them in the lowercase. So, in this case, our final statement becomes: "Hello, my Name is Jim" We're gradually getting closer to a statement that would function perfectly as a title, but we're not yet there. Next up…

Always Capitalize Your Verbs, Adverbs, and Adjectives

Words like "my" and "your" can be confusing since they function as different types of speech depending on how they're used. Technically speaking, they're attributive adjectives or adverbs denoting possession. This means that they commute the ownership attributed through a pronoun to a common noun or verb. If "I have a car", then that car, by definition, is "my car". The English language doesn't require you to capitalize your possession bearing adjectives and adverbs while writing sentences, but titles are different once again. All styles, including the APA (American Psychological Association), MLA (Modern Language Association), CMOS (Chicago Manual Of Style, at times, shortened to CMS), and AP (Associated Press) styles require you to capitalize all of your adverbs and adjectives, regardless of their position in a title. So going back to our initial statement, we had: "Hello, my Name is Jim" This now becomes: "Hello, My Name is Jim" Which is our finalized version of the title.

Always Leave Your Articles in Lower Case

Articles are words such as the, a, and an, which tell you whether you're referring to a general or specific object (i.e.the calculator refers to a specific calculator vs. a calculator, which is used to make general statements about calculators). As a rule of thumb, it's good to keep in mind that all articles are left in lower case unless they start or end your title.

The Tricky Part of Capitalizing Your title

Now that we've covered the broad strokes version of what to capitalize and what to leave in lower case let's look at parts of speech that have more intricacies involved.

Prepositions

The first area of contention, which most people tend to have trouble with, is prepositions. Prepositions are words that are usually used before pronouns and other nouns to define relations between objects. So when you say someone "arrived after dinner", or that "they were resting inside the room", the words after and inside are actually examples of prepositions. Other examples of prepositions include in, with, within, without, besides, among, around, above, below, across, against, and many more. Different schools of thought have differing opinions regarding what to capitalize and what to leave in regular case in a title when it comes to prepositions.

APA Citation

Regarding the APA citation style, you're only supposed to capitalize your longer prepositions (four letters or more) while leaving shorter ones in lower case. So when you're dealing with examples such as "A Walk Through the Meadow" you have to capitalize the word "Through", even though it's a preposition and it isn't situated at the beginning or end of your title. However, if you're using a shorter preposition, such as in the case of "A Walk in the Park", the preposition is written in lower case.

AP Stylebook

The Associated Press Stylebook is similar in that you only capitalize longer prepositions.

Chicago Manual of Style

The Chicago Manual of Style is slightly more difficult to deal with regarding what you should and shouldn't capitalize. The general rule is that you should never capitalize any prepositions or conjunctions unless:
  • They're used adverbially or adjectivally
  • They're used as conjunctions
  • They call for emphasis or are stressed upon
The first two rules are fairly direct and leave little room for the imagination. If you're saying"My Clothes are Soaked Through" or "Think It Through", you're using the word ‘through’ as an adverb, and it needs to be left capitalized. Similar is the case above when we talk about "A Walk Through the Meadow". The word through is being used as an adjective in this example, so it'll be capitalized once again. The third rule is a little more ambivalent, so you've got room to be creative in the third scenario. After all, what you choose to emphasize or draw the reader's attention to is entirely up to you as the writer, so you can justify capitalizing prepositions in some cases where they play a critical role in defining the meaning of your title.

MLA Style

The last major style we've got to look at is the Modern Language Association style, most commonly used in liberal arts or humanities texts. MLA advises you to leave all your prepositions in lower case, except when they're being used as subordinating conjunctions. We'll cover the specifics of these in the next section. For now, it's best to just keep in mind that MLA doesn't have a word length requirement when it comes to capitalizing prepositions within your title; if you're dealing with a preposition, leave it in lower case.

Conjunctions

There are two kinds of conjunctions in the English Language: subordinating conjunctions and coordinating conjunctions. Coordinating conjunctions are words that join two individual statements of equal relevance and importance. Think of words like "and" and "or"; when you say you'll "have either breakfast or lunch", or when you say that you "intend to visit the barbershop and the tailor", the order in which you use the noun terms is usually unimportant. This is because coordinating conjunctions join together two statements of the same grammatical relevance. One statement isn't a precursor or a prerequisite to the other. Subordinating conjunctions like "before", "after", and "until" are different. If you say"I ate before dusk", it's not the same thing as saying "It was dusk before I ate". In fact, both statements have mutually exclusive meanings. One says that you ate your meal before a certain time, while the other says that a certain amount of time had passed before you got to eat. Both cannot be true together. This is the key difference between subordinating and coordinating conjunctions. Subordinating conjunctions combine two statements where one statement is somehow dependent upon the other, either to show one as a necessary consequence of the other or the exact opposite. There's a lot of overlap between prepositions and subordinating conjunctions, and there're plenty of words (like all three of our examples up there) that function as both conjunctions and prepositions. When it comes to the Associated Press Stylebook or the APA Style guide, you're supposed to never capitalize your conjunctions, regardless of the type, unless they're more than four letters long. When it comes to CMOS and MLA, you can only capitalize subordinating conjunctions but never coordinating conjunctions.

Compound Words

Compound or hyphenated words require some handling if you insert them into your titles, but they're just a few rules you need to be aware of. They're the same for the Chicago, APA, and MLA style guides, so you don't have to worry about remembering different rules for each. To start off, if the compound word consists of two separate individual words that carry meaning, you'll capitalize both. An example of this is "self-report", which would be written as "Self-Report" if part of a title. Secondly, if you're dealing with a hyphenated word that consists of a prefix and another word, you'll capitalize just the prefix and leave the actual word in lower case. So the word "anti-inflammatory" would be written as "Anti-inflammatory". The same also applies to words with a single letter attached as a prefix (such as t-shirt, which would be written as T-shirt). Finally, if you're dealing with a compound word that contains prepositions, articles, or coordinating conjunctions, you'll leave the preposition, article, or coordinating conjunction in lower case while capitalizing the rest of the word as outlined above. So a word such as "holier-than-thou" would be written as "Holier-than-Thou" within a title.

The Final Word

Those are all the rules you need to know when deciding what should and shouldn't be capitalized in your title. Be sure to be mindful that the rules for sentence cases tend to be very different from title cases, and you'll be on your way to producing quality content. Of course, there's more to creating quality content, whether it be an article, book, or blog post, our team of content writers can help. [post_title] => Capitalizing Your Title: The Dos, Don'ts and Details [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => capitalizing-your-title-the-dos-donts-and-details [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 08:52:35 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 12:52:35 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2636 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [4] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2632 [post_author] => 4 [post_date] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content] => Tips for magazine article writing Do you wish to see your byline adorning the pages of your favorite publication? Do you want to build a reader base that awaits your next article with bated breath? Well, with a little bit of work, you can take your magazine article writing skills to the next level. The key to writing great magazine articles is to create content that engages from start to finish, and provides value to the reader. Regardless of which magazine you are aiming for, a few tips can help you master your craft and produce articles that any publication in the world would be proud to put out for you. However, before we delve into our tips on writing magazine articles, let's take a moment to understand how this particular form of writing differs from other online content writing.

Magazine Article Writing Vs. Other Forms of Writing

Writing an article for a magazine is not the same as writing one for a newspaper or an online directory. Moreover, the pieces you may see in a magazine are inherently different from the content you may find in journals and books as well. The tone and style of these articles vary with each publication, genre, and topic. However, two things set these pieces apart from other forms of writing – they allow more room for creativity and tend to be more visually appealing. While article writing and book writing also require creative input and critical thinking, drafting magazine articles allows you to play with different visual aspects. The use of colorful graphics and photographs to capture attention becomes a must. Furthermore, the length of magazine articles depends on the publication you’re writing for, what you're writing and who you're writing for. In most cases, writing content for the internet does not come with word count limitations. And insofar as books are concerned, you’re usually your own boss. But to give you an idea, an average magazine article can be anywhere between half a page to a dozen pages. Nonetheless, the word count for 12-page pieces is usually not as high as you'd think since they are interspersed with pictures and advertisements.

Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Connect

article writing Here are some tips on how to create magazine articles that will grab your readers' attention.

1. Write About Things You Are Interested In

You are more likely to create engaging content if you write about something you find intriguing or exciting. Your passion for a specific cause or topic will not only show in your work, but it will improve the quality of the output automatically. Articles written with passion are more likely to connect as they give readers a peek into your heart and soul. If you let your words reflect your love and devotion to the subject of your article, it will convince your readers to trust your judgment and authority. Magazine articles are an excellent medium for talented writers to showcase their skills while playing to their strengths. Moreover, publishers always prefer pieces that have an element of individuality. So, if you are particularly fond of something – be it music, traveling, cooking, or martial arts – make sure to use it as your calling card. However, just because you think you know a topic inside out doesn't mean you should cut corners while conducting research. It is essential to scour the internet and see what others are saying. Also, look for the latest stats and back up your claims with valuable insight.

2. Use Compelling Headings and Sub-Headings

Although this tip is not unique to magazine article writing, it requires a special mention. Your headline is the first thing a reader would see while browsing through the index of their favorite magazine or on the front page of their search engine. It is the focal point of your article, as it draws your readers' attention and encourages them to click on it. Many experts compare a well-crafted headline to a beautiful wrapping paper. However, in reality, it is a gift itself. An excellent headline, paired with equally compelling subheadings, will build the interest of your readers. Therefore, you should put in extra effort to create headlines that perfectly capture the essence of your article without giving everything away. Just make sure they are not misleading. It is also a good practice to include your main keyword in the main heading to make your post easy to discover. We'll discuss more on this later.

3. Reel In the Audience with a Unique Angle

One of the best ways to make your magazine article appealing is by ensuring it has a unique perspective. Start by creating a profile for your target audience and figure out where their interests lie. You can also look at the articles published by your competitors and industry giants. Doing so will help you determine which angles have been discussed before and which require more exploration. Instead of just scratching the surface, dig a little deeper and discover fresh viewpoints that establish you as an expert in the field. Even if you are writing on a mainstream topic, such as a new superhero movie that has recently hit the theatres, focus on the aspects that others have not bothered to explore. Remember, creating value-added content will keep your readers engaged and the publisher happy.

4. Keep It Short, Sweet, and To the Point

Brevity is the soul of any well-written content. If you want your magazine article to remain engaging from the first sentence to the last, you must make it easy to read and understand. It is generally good to use short and simple sentences. You should break your information into small chunks without leaving any room for ambiguity. Of course, depending on the nature of your article, you may have to use a few complex sentences. However, using too many complicated terms and long sentences can distract the readers. Moreover, make sure your readers can follow your train of thought without making much effort. Set the pace to match the article's tone, and don't let your message get lost between long sentences. If your audience finds your magazine article writing skills tedious or frustrating, there is a good chance they won't come back for more. Apart from using short and concise sentences, ensure your paragraphs don't exceed six lines. Adding bulleted lists to your content can also make it easy to skim and comprehend, attracting the readers.

5. Include Visual Elements

Break up huge chunks of text with striking pictures, powerful graphics, and well-explained charts. Including valuable visual elements in your magazine article is a foolproof way to increase audience engagement. They will give your audience a chance to rest their eyes without taking their attention away from the piece. With the right images, you can explain your idea or perspective without saying a lot. Additionally, photos and videos can make your content more memorable. They can help your readers interact with the piece, which may also increase their willingness to return to it. These are among the leading reasons why most publishers and brand owners invest extensively on graphic work to support their written content. How to write articles for magazines

6. Get Your Audience Involved and Invested

Starting your magazine article with a thought-provoking question or a shocking fact can help you grab the interest of your audience from the get-go. If your question is something that your readers can relate to personally, it will undoubtedly compel them to read further. However, to draw the attention of your readers, you must understand their desires and pain points. You should also know about your audience's gender, age, and location to choose your article's right style and tone. After all, the ideas that may intrigue women aged 30 to 45 are not likely to resonate with men aged 50 to 65. Furthermore, always address your readers directly. Writing in the second person will allow you to use words such as "you,” "your," and "yours." Your readers should feel as if you have written the article just for them. Once they build that connection, they'll stay hooked until the very last page. Also, make your piece sound like a discussion one would have with their friend. It shouldn't come across as a lesson or an essay. This magazine article writing tip will surely help your audience feel like a part of the narrative.

7. Don't State Facts, Tell a Story

Storytelling is an art. While anyone can share factual information, it takes expertise and a unique thought process to tell a story. As a writer, your biggest priority should be keeping your readers on their toes as they take in your words and build a world of their own. Whether you are writing about politics or deep-sea diving, your anecdotes and experiences can set your article apart from the rest. Sharing small stories also allows your audience to connect with you on an emotional level. It makes you and your words more relatable. People may not remember the statistics you've shared in your article. But they are most likely to remember the tidbits from your personal life that made their way onto the page. To create compelling content, take inspiration from your past experiences or create fictitious scenarios to leave your audience spellbound. You can also use analogies, quotes, and pop culture references to breathe a new life into your content.

8. Choose Your Keywords Wisely

Magazines are no longer limited to the print medium. You can now access almost every magazine online, with some charging a small subscription fee and others allowing you to read their content for free. Now, you may have heard that we should write for people and not the search engines. Our question is, why not write for both? Creating compelling and engaging content is just not enough. You also need to make your articles discoverable. Search engine optimization or SEO is the most effective way to make sure your audience finds your posts. You need tofind out what people are looking for and incorporate those keywords into your article. According to the SEO best practices, your main keyword should appear at the article's beginning, middle, and end. You can also include two to three additional keywords throughout the content. It will increase the chances of your article ranking higher on Google.

9. Wrap It Up Nicely

Don't let your closing statement go to waste. As you wrap up your article, utilize the last few lines to include a CTA call to action. It is essentially a way for you to tell your readers what to do next. Whether you are looking for feedback or want your audience to check out your latest video series, make sure to include a relevant link that directs them to your preferred webpage or service. The next step is to edit your content. You can use services such as Grammarly or Copyscape to ensure your article is free of mistakes and plagiarism. This is also your last opportunity to format the piece and ensure no negative spaces or weird indentations. Moreover, please use different font sizes for headings, subheadings, and body to increase readability and engagement. You can also use bold words and italicized sentences to make your critical ideas more prominent.

Magazine Article Writing Made Easy

To conclude, there are no set rules to writing a compelling magazine article. However, the tips mentioned above will enable you to break the mold by producing great content. A wisely chosen topic with a unique perspective and great headline can do wonders for your career. Similarly, short and clear sentences sprinkled with personal anecdotes can make your article more fun to read. If you feel a little lost in how to do go it alone, our article writing service could be the order of the day. Our team of experienced article writers ably supported by our team of expert designers can help you create magazine articles that hit the right note every time. [post_title] => 9 Tips for Writing Magazine Articles that Hook Readers from Start to Finish [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => 9-tips-for-writing-magazine-articles-that-hook-readers-from-start-to-finish [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-10-06 07:50:20 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-10-06 11:50:20 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2632 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [5] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2622 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-29 06:30:30 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-29 10:30:30 [post_content] => how to write product descriptions A compelling product description is crucial to the success of your eCommerce business. For those of you that don’t know, these are essential pieces of marketing copy that describes your product’s features and benefits to potential customers, persuading them to buy. Excellent product descriptions accurately capture the essence of a product to influence purchase decisions. In other words, they can well be the back bone of your online business’s success. Most entrepreneurs and marketers struggle with writing powerful product descriptions that can convert casual bowsers into life-long customers. They craft their copies around factual information and don't focus on the fact that they are selling an actual product to a real person. As a result, most product descriptions look like a block of information you are likely to find at the back of a product label. Below, we have put together some tried-and-tested tips on how to write a product description that converts.

1. Define Your Target Audience

Before you start writing a product description, you must understand the persona of your potential buyer. Defining your target audience can help you address them directly and engage them in a conversation. You can only create an impactful copy if you know who you're writing for and what would compel the reader to buy your product. It is also important to remember that the features that may entice one demographic might not be valuable to the other. Moreover, knowing your audiencecan help you select the right words and answer the right questions. It also enables you to find the perfect tone for the product.For example, you may want to inject humor into a product description for Christmas sweaters, but you can't use the same writing style to sell medical equipment or something more serious, such as coffins. Narrowing down the consumer characteristics can help you draft a copy that is equal parts informative and persuasive. If your product description addresses the pain points, values, interests, and frustrations of your buyers, there is a good chance they'd be willing to spend their hard-earned money on it.

2. Focus on Benefits over Features

Agreat product description must include all the information a buyer may need to make a purchase. It should tell the customer about the unique specifications of your product that set it apart from the rest and share any technical facts that may influence their decision. However, you must also understand that the features you are excited to write about might not necessarily interest your target audience. Some of them may even find it boring. The best way to retain customer attention and capture their interest is by explaining how the product will benefit them. Your copy should describe the advantages of a product and tell the buyer how it will reduce their pain points or enhance their quality of life. Before you start writing a product description, list down the top features of the item you are selling and then translate them into substantial benefits. Moreover, to prevent your copy from looking like an advertisement, refrain from using superfluous words. It would be best if you also avoided using superlatives that you can't justify. Following this tip will help you how to write a description that converts into a sale.

3. Elicit Emotions through Storytelling

A strong product description provides the buyers with all the relevant details and impacts them emotionally. According to a 2009 research study,holding a product in hand increases a person's desire to buy or own it. However, since they can't physically touch your product through their screens, your job is to paint a vivid picture that also packs an emotional punch. If you want your product descriptions to convert, make sure your content tells a story that your potential buyers can connect with. You can set the scene by telling them who created the product and what inspired them to do so. Taking the buyers on the journey of developing the product will allow them to relate to it. Depending on what you're selling, a personal anecdote or an entertaining fact about the product may also increase the buyer's interest. Nonetheless, you must make sure your words don't come across as dishonest or insincere. On the contrary, your story should enable customers to envision the product and how it would add value to their life.

4. Make It Sound like a Real Conversation

conversational product descriptions It may be tempting to sprinkle your product description with fancy words and literary references, but doing so can potentially turn away your customers. So, if you want the buyers to connect with your product emotionally and ultimately buy it, consider adopting a natural tone and using simple words. Ideally, a product description should sound like a conversation between friends. It should flow smoothly and have a life of its own. Instead of making sweeping statements, you should inform your buyers about the features and benefits just like you would share with a friend or a loved one. The customer should feel like you have their best interest at heart and that your words are not merely transactional. Product descriptions that use natural language and a friendly tone can help your eCommerce business  build a loyal customer base. Potential buyers are more likely to purchase if they find your copy to be honest and genuine. It would also help you stand out from the competition and make your products more memorable. If you need help writing product descriptions that sell, please feel free to give us a call.

5. Be Mindful of Power Words

Did you know there are certain words you can include in your product description to elicit a response from your target audience? More often than not, business owners and marketers end up using words such as "revolutionary" or "innovative"to describe a product when it is anything but that. Instead, sprinkle your copy with descriptive words and adjectives that may excite or intrigueyour prospective buyers. For example, if you are writing a product description for a dress, you can replace the terms "pretty" and "high-quality" with "sensational"and"luxurious." According to David Ogilvy, here are some of the most influential words that can turn a casual reader into a buyer.
  • Suddenly
  • Now
  • Announcing
  • Introducing
  • Amazing
  • Sensational
  • Revolutionary
  • Miracle
  • Magic
  • Quick
  • Hurry
Using these power words can take your product description to the next level.

6. Make Your Copy Easy to Scan

A great product description is easy to read and understand. Instead of explaining your product in lengthy and complex paragraphs, consider using simple sentences that get the message across. Customers have a notoriously short attention span when it comes to making online purchases. So, the best thing you can do to keep them interested in your product is to present them with a description that they can scan. For example, you can break down product specifications into bullet points to make them more reader-friendly. Moreover, different font sizes and lots of white space can help break the visual clutter. Your buyer shouldn't have to sift through long pieces of writing to find valuable information. Instead, you should present it to them on a figurative silver platter. Incorporating the product's name into the heading and using highlighted words can also impact the reader's attention span. If you’re struggling to create quality product descriptions at scale, our product description writing service might be what you need.

7. Optimize for Search Engines

Optimize your product descriptions for Google Search Including specific keywords in your product descriptions can help improve your search engine optimization (SEO). This will ultimately increase your chances of ranking high on the search results page. If you want to draft a conversion-oriented copy, make sure to do a little bit of keyword research to find out what the customers are searching for. Once you have found suitable keywords, integrate them and their variations into your content. The SEO best practices suggest placing keywords in the page titles, Meta descriptions, and image tags.  For good measure, include the main keyword at the top and bottom of your page to ensure your customers can easily find your product. It is also worth mentioning that your content should not be stuffed with keywords, as it may make your product description look unauthentic. The goal of optimizing your product description is to help gain new customers. Adding relevant keywords will allow prospective buyers to discover your brand and learn about its values with a few simple clicks on their device. Furthermore, adding relevant tags to product images also carries a lot of weight with search engines, which takes us to our next tip on how to write a product description that compels customers.

8. Always Use Quality Images

As the wise adage goes, a picture is worth a thousand words. If you want to master the art of writing excellent product descriptions, you cannot compromise on the quality of images. As mentioned above, customers cannot physically see or touch your product. While your words can help them envision how the product may look or feel, adding a good image along with your text can actually encourage them to buy it. It is one of the essential parts of a powerful product description. Most high-end brands hire professionals to create stunning photos and videos that capture all the best features of their products. However, spending precious resources on such services may not be feasible for new startups and small businesses. Instead of focusing too much on what your competitors are doing, divert your energy to take a few quality photos that enhance your product and effectively display its unique specifications. As long as your image is large, clear, and in line with the overall theme of your brand, there is a good chance that it will manage to convert readers into buyers. The accompanying copy should also create imagery that entices the customer into imagining what it would be like to hold or use the product.

What a short video regarding product description importance

Our Final Thoughts

Those were our best tips on how to write a product description that compels potential customers to make a purchase. If you are an entrepreneur or a small business owner looking to create brand awareness and improve your conversion rate, our team of content writers is ever-ready to help. To find out more about our services, contact us today. [post_title] => How to Write Compelling Product Descriptions that Convert [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-compelling-product-descriptions-that-convert [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:37:32 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:37:32 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2622 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [6] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2616 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content] => Bio Writing We’ve all had to be introspective at some point, especially when you’re looking to put yourself out there through a professional bio. You’ve likely thought about who you are or what qualities you embody. You’ve thought about your achievements.  Thinking to yourself is one thing, though, and writing it down for an external audience is entirely another. On the surface, it should be fairly simple. It’s a short paragraph or two describing your professional journey so far and where you intend to take it. But then why do so many people struggle to write a bio that adequately captures who they are? We’ve put together a checklist of the things that combine to make a great bio. To start off:

Start Strong

In many ways, the most important part of your blog is the opening section. A strong introduction not only reels your readers in, it can also serve to highlight the strongest aspects of your repertoire. Those first few lines need to be absolutely spot on to prompt the person reading to continue, so don’t skimp on your trial and error. Try out as many opening lines as you can think of if you feel like your current iteration could be better. Be confident, be honest, and don’t hesitate to strut your stuff. The opening lines are all about making an impact, and there’s a variety of ways to do this. You can open with humour, you can open with an achievement that speaks for itself, or you can open with a reference. There’s room to experiment, so there’s no excuse for trying as hard as you can to think of what fits your bio best.

Be Partial Towards Recent Developments, but Don’t Hesitate to Discuss How Got You Here

Like a resume, the more current your bio is, the better. Make sure you include a sentence or two that tells people, at least vaguely, about where you are now and what you’re doing. It lets prospective interests know what you’re doing these days and whether your skillset is relevant to them. While you might be tempted to list events in order of recency, don’t do that. Not every post is important, and not every move significant. Instead, if there’s a turning point in your professional development, such as a time when you switched fields three years ago, you’re better off addressing that. It’s not as if you’ve got room to be long-winded, but you should still discuss what prompted the switch, so long as you were positively motivated. You can sneak in a line or two about how your prior experience empowers you in your current line of work as well.

Decide on a Tone and Keep It Consistent

A bio is a concise description and one that sees many iterations as your career evolves and your professional development progresses. If you’re used to cutting out and adding in individual lines (and even if you’re not), it’s good to give the whole thing a read over to see if you’re consistent. While the right tone for you will depend entirely on what career you’re in and how you’re most comfortable expressing yourself, there are certain pointers. You shouldn’t be arrogant or overly informal; it’s much better to phrase your brags as subtly as possible and maintain a polite disposition. Achievements are more effective when mildly understated than they are when blown out of proportion, so make sure you maintain a humble tone. Humor isn’t necessarily off the cards, but you have to balance it out with serious statements. Also, your best bet is tongue-in-cheek humor rather than something that might risk offending someone; remember, this is a professional piece. Consistency also extends to whether or not you’re writing in first-person. Don’t go from I to they (first to third-person), or skip the pronoun altogether (implied the first person). This of course is easier said than done, and if it’s not for you – there is no shame in hiring professional bio writers instead.

Don’t Forget to Inject some Personality into Your Writing

personality in your bio One of the most typical mistakes when writing a bio is being too formulaic in your approach. You find something that really works, so you copy the same structure or type out the entire thing in as neutral a tone as possible. Nothing which worked for someone else needs to work just as well for you. Your Bio should be like your fingerprint, abstractly similar but entirely unique in itself. You have an entire lifetime of experiences at your disposal, so be sure to showcase as much of them as you can, as positively as you can. Your writing conveys not only your experiences but also aspects of your outlook and who you are. You shouldn’t shy away from including stuff about your innermost goals and motivations to the extent that you’re comfortable. While you shouldn’t be too flowery in your use of language, don’t be afraid to use more complicated terms where there is merit to them.

Always Double Check Guidelines

The platform or portal you’re submitting your bio to might have specific guidelines for what’s considered a valid submission. Always make sure that you check all the boxes and that you haven’t included anything that they’ve disallowed. This also means that you won’t be able to submit the same exact bio to every single prospect, but that should be standard practice as it is. Make sure you tailor your bio to the sort of opportunity you’re on the hunt for to give yourself the best possible chances.

Be Concise

Top the point writing We’ve already discussed how you shouldn’t pad your bio, but there’s more to a good bio than just keeping things simple. Your bio is meant to be a rich summary of your recent professional experiences, but you don’t need to mention every single thing you’ve already mentioned with your resume. This brings us to another point: you should try to keep repetition between your bio and your resume to a minimum. That’s not to say there should be no overlap at all, but rather, that your bio should only further explore the most important parts of your resume, the parts you want a potential employer to focus on. By emphasizing those tenures, you can draw attention to aspects of your development that may not have been adequately represented as just another bullet point in your CV or LinkedIn profile.

Don’t List Your Achievements

Recall what we said about trying to keep yourself sounding as down to earth as possible. If your bio reads like a list of things you’ve accomplished, you’re not doing it right. Instead of leading every statement with what you are or what you’ve achieved, try to pivot to what you have to offer someone you’d want to establish a professional relationship with. Instead of talking about your skills and how you’ve acquired them, talk about what those skills can accomplish for someone working with you. People want to see what value you bring to the table, so making your bio about what you have to give, rather than just what you have, is a great strategy to employ.

Add a Personal Touch

We’ve already discussed the importance of abandoning the formulaic approach, but a great bio goes further than that. A bio should demonstrate more than just professional experience; it’s a representation of who you are. As such, you can’t expect to paint a clear picture of yourself by talking about your career alone; you can and should include references to personal triumphs and milestones. We’re obviously not talking about detailed narrations (you don’t have the words to spare, nor that much creative license), but you can definitely include distilled versions of them. Simply mentioning that you’re an aquaphobe learning how to swim, for example, can tell your employer plenty about the fact that you take adversity on the chin and that you have a mind to surmount obstacles. Personal touches like these help highlight crucial aspects of your personality that might help distinguish you from other applicants, so it’s a good idea to include something about your life. Another way you could benefit from a personal addition is to use it to demonstrate your more personable traits. This could be through humor, or a line or two about your charitable pursuits, or just what you enjoy doing in your free time. Either way, it helps paint you as more than just a robot with work experience, so be sure to make the most of it.

Maintain a Balance

So you’ve got to include aspects of your personality, personal pursuits, career progression, and current state of employment. While adequately covering all of those focus areas, you also have to flow so that your bio doesn’t read like a series of disconnected statements. And you have to keep to a very strict word count while doing all of the above. This can prove daunting, even for the best of us, and that’s why bio writing is more art than science. It’s also why revising your bio is a very tedious process that can involve hours of brainstorming with very little to show for it.

Watch a short video to learn more about What is a Biography

Bio Writers to Make Your Look Like a Million Bucks

If you’ve been having trouble with figuring out just the right words to put in your bio, or you’re second-guessing what your bio should look like – our team of Professional Bio Writers can help. From techies to published authors, finance execs to teachers – our versatile team of bio writers understands what every bio needs and delivers. [post_title] => How to Write the Perfect Professional Bio [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => how-to-write-the-perfect-professional-bio [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-22 06:26:09 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-22 10:26:09 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2616 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [7] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2608 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-15 06:51:31 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:51:31 [post_content] => writing SEO friendly content Search engine optimization, or SEO, as it may be known to most of you, is a rapidly evolving discipline that has been on the rise ever since Google took the world of search engines by storm. Accoridngly, learning how to write SEO-firendly articles is number one on the checklist of content producers that want to ace SERPs.

Keep Up-to-date with Google

Last year, Google announced the addition of core web vitals and page experience signals as ranking factors in search results. We won't get into too much detail about what these are specifically just yet, but you should know that your core web vitals tell Google how quickly and smoothly a page loads in front of a user. The other page experience signals are, more or less, boxes you need to check regarding the security of your connection with your users, and that they're being delivered a quality experience that isn't overly annoying or outdated. All we mean to do with the above is highlight that the field of search engine optimization is constantly evolving. With Google needing to constantly roll out updates to combat people finding shortcuts to ranking better (such as black hat backlinking practices) or breaking ranking factors altogether and using them for gaming the system (such as keyword cramming). While Google does come out with its SEO guidelines to help people understand how they can improve their website and put out content in a way that helps them rank better, what Google does not do is tell you exactly how searches are ranked and how much each individual metric contributes to your overall ranking. For all of these reasons and others, keeping up with all of the advancements taking place within the field of SEO can be a difficult task, even for those of us that call SEO their bread and butter.

Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content

If you've tried learning how to do your own SEO before, and you found the process to be too tedious or difficult, then this article is for you. Not only will we go over exactly how you can go about making your content SEO friendly, we'll also let you know key tips and tools you can use to help you with the process.

Tip 1: Select the right topics to write about

A great way to make a splash on those Search Engine Ranking Pages (SERPs) is to select topics that are currently garnering interest amongst the public. Even if your website or business's actual domain area isn't the most popular, get creative and find ways to link it to those popular topics. Remember, even the best-written content won't garner views if you're writing about something that no one wants to read about. This is where learning how to use Google Trends for SEO could be beneficial. Content marketing strategies are great and all, but you'd have to be a magician to get people to read an article they have no interest in. If you're worried that focusing on topics of interest will have you competing with industry giants for rankings, don't be. Remember, recency is also a factor in search results ranking, so simply the fact that you're posting your stuff today is going to get you at least some preferential treatment. And if your stuff is original and out of the box, providing a fresh perspective or some expertise that can't be found elsewhere, that's going to push you up even further. Besides, you shouldn't be worried about the competition anyways; SERPs are full of examples of Davids who counter Industry Goliaths, and the next one might just be you. As long as you can focus on providing quality experience to your users (and do so consistently), it'll always shine through sooner or later. Of course, this is where our article writing service can give you the leg up.

Tip 2: Keyword research is still paramount (and probably will continue to be for at least a while)

SEO-friendly content needs strong keyword research There's one aspect of SEO that hasn't changed much over the years: Using high-interest keywords still helps you rise to the top of rank results. You should make it a routine practice to check out keyword rankings relating to your topic area, once before you've written your piece and once after it's done, right before you publish. Why before you publish? To make sure you haven't overused your keyword or used too many keywords in your text. A piece that's 500 words long shouldn't try to target ten different keywords, and it shouldn't contain fifteen instances of your primary keyword. Black hat hacks like these were popular during the early years of SEO, but Google's done plenty to prevent them from being viable today. Don't fall victim to your own bad practices. For a standard guideline regarding how many instances of a particular keyword should be in an article:
  • Keep yourself to two to three instances at most for a 500-word article
  • Add one for each additional 500 words when it comes to longer articles.
According to this directive, a 2000 word piece should contain six instances of a particular keyword. Naturally, if your keyword is a generic term, you might find yourself using it a bit more, and that's okay, but try to avoid being too repetitive with it. Try for synonyms or abbreviations, anything you can do to avoid making it seem like you've crammed; if you can tell, chances are Google can too. Aside from this, try to be as strategic as you can with your keyword use. Don't rush to put out a piece relating to each popular search term you can find that's relevant to your business. There's such a thing as Keyword Cannibalization; it's where your own articles are competing with one another for the same keyword and actually taking traffic away from one another. We're sure we don't need to spell it out for you, but this isn't a good thing. When it comes to terms that are highly relevant to your website, try to put out long-form content that covers as many aspects of the term as you can, rather than rushing to release content relating to every term people could possibly search for. Be strategic with your content; it will pay dividends in the long run. Oh, and speaking of being strategic…

Tip 3: Plan out an approach to content that lets you make the most of different types of articles

Google and other search engines tend to love websites that are regularly updated. This means releasing daily content for many website owners, even if that content is just a rehashed version of an article they'd put out the previous week. This might work for some people, but it certainly isn't a surefire way to succeed with your content. If you're going to have to repeat yourself eventually, and you know it, you should plan out your topics so that you maximize the amount of time there is between two similar articles. You can use the time in between to figure out how you can cover the same topic or domain area from a different perspective.

Struggling for Ideas? Well, that’s what professionals are for. Our diverse team of content writers are not only well-versed with creating compelling and unique content – but at scale.

Another way to keep things fresh is to cover topical, time-sensitive developments within your focus area. For example, you can write a long-form cornerstone article on content writing best practices, and that article can remain the same for a long while. Instead of writing about that topic again, you can later release content about how opinion pieces are the way to go in 2021 and fill that article with reasons for why perspective based content is especially relevant after we've all experienced a lockdown that cut us off from being exposed to other opinions. While opinion pieces don't inspire the sort of trust that a faultless factual piece might, they're excellent for increasing engagement and getting people talking in your comments section. There's no real substitute for user engagement and no second-guessing the fact that search engines are partial towards content that engages readers, so why not experiment a bit and get creative. And creativity doesn't just have to do with how and what you write about.

Tip 4: Use every channel (and platform) at your disposal to make people aware of the content you're publishing

social media like facebook is key for SEO content Social Media is a great way to get more eyes on your content. If an article on your site isn't getting the traction you'd want it to, posting a link to the article on your business's Facebook page along with a captivating tagline or quote from the article might be just the thing to get those numbers up to desirable levels. More clicks mean more views, and more views mean preferential treatment within search results, so don't be shy about plugging your content wherever you can. There was a time when businesses just needed to have a listing in the Yellow Pages, but that time has long since passed. Now businesses are everywhere, from Facebook and Instagram to Twitter and LinkedIn. There's no reason your business shouldn't have a face on each and every one of these platforms. If you pay enough attention to what works on each of them, you might just find that one, in particular, is extremely conducive to the type of content you're putting out and gets you more traffic than the rest of them. Once you know this, you can start focusing more on generating more content for that platform and using that content to generate more traffic for your e-commerce website or storefront. A content writing service can be your saving grace here. Getting people to your content isn't everything though, you've also got to think about where people are going from your articles…

Tip 5: Make sure you put the right links in your content (and the right type of links as well)

Everyone knows not to link to their competitors. But if you've been in the content game as long as we have, you might also know that you can't just back up your own content with any material you can find that supports your claims. There's a LOT of repetition on the Internet. You can Google any topic and find twenty different articles all saying the same thing using slightly different words. You might think that linking to any one of them serves the purposes you need for your articles, but that just isn't true. So what then, do you link to the best written of those articles? Not always. Informational content, such as the stuff you'd find on a .edu or .gov site. .Org sites are good, too, as long as the article you're linking to isn't trying to sell something itself. SEO-friendly content is written with the intent to inform and it always tends to rank better and contribute more to the credibility of what you're saying than content that has an ulterior motive. Keep that in mind while you're selecting which articles to link to. Credible links get your website more "Authority". Authority is a holistic metric that determines how much clout you have within your domain or focus area. Quality internal links also help you gain authority since users can jump from article to article within your site without finding redundant or otherwise fruitless content. But if you're too liberal with your external links (i.e. links that lead out of your site) you can end up losing authority to the pages you link to. This isn't always a bad thing, but you should try to use "no follow" links for at least some of your outbound links for this reason. No-follow links prevent crawlers from passing authority along from your site to the site you're linking to.

SEO-Friendly Content by Experts

If you've enjoyed this list of SEO-friendly practices to help your website take off, consider reaching out to us to find out more about what we can do to help revamp your content portfolio. We've got years of experience in the industry and a long list of satisfied clientele to back us up, so why not give us a call. [post_title] => Tips for Writing SEO-friendly Content to Gain Visibility on Search Engines [post_excerpt] => [post_status] => publish [comment_status] => open [ping_status] => open [post_password] => [post_name] => tips-for-writing-seo-friendly-content [to_ping] => [pinged] => [post_modified] => 2021-09-15 06:53:06 [post_modified_gmt] => 2021-09-15 10:53:06 [post_content_filtered] => [post_parent] => 0 [guid] => https://www.contentdevelopmentpros.com/blog/?p=2608 [menu_order] => 0 [post_type] => post [post_mime_type] => [comment_count] => 0 [filter] => raw ) [8] => WP_Post Object ( [ID] => 2598 [post_author] => 6 [post_date] => 2021-09-08 08:17:26 [post_date_gmt] => 2021-09-08 12:17:26 [post_content] => Hire professional transcribers Speech recognition has come a long way and has been one of the leading developments in reach towards the Internet of Things. Now, with Google Home and Amazon’s Alexa, we can control just about any aspect of room ambience without moving an inch. While services like these might lead you to believe that speech recognition has evolved to the point where human transcription just doesn’t make sense anymore, we’re still far from being there yet. We’re not saying that speech recognition hasn’t grown by leaps and bounds in the past decade or so, far from it, in fact, it’s just that it’s not quite gotten to the point where it can be considered as reliable as the human mind. In other words, if you want accurate transcriptions where context, punctuation and accents are accounted for, going for a transcription writing service is your best bet. Before we can explore a comparison between these two methods, let us take a look at what both are:

Hiring Professional Transcribers Over Speech Recognition

Manual transcription is fairly straightforward. A person listens to an audio recording and jots down the contents; there isn’t much to explain there. To understand why human beings are better at this task, we must first understand how we interpret language. The human mind is a multi-track processor. This means that it can selectively and intuitively utilize multiple processes towards the same end, switching freely between those processes as the need arises. The most powerful tool we have at our disposal when it comes to understanding speech is the flexible use of context. We can glean details about the subject conversation like several speakers, roles in the conversation, subject matter, and key points, just from listening to the conversation for a small amount of time. Even if there are noisier sections, we can pause, rewind, and play again until we arrive at a reasonable guess for what is being said. If that doesn’t work, we can continue further along in the conversation and figure out what might have gone in a particular section through later references.

How Accurate is Speech Recognition

ASR, or Automated Speech Recognition, is the domain of computer science and technological research that deals with getting computers to understand the spoken word. In an ideal scenario, where you’re dealing with clean (noiseless), high fidelity audio, a computer can indeed measure up to human standards and even compete with top-notch transcribers. Just so you can compare, the human error rate during audio transcription is about four percent, while these artificial intelligence-based technologies usually hover around the five percent mark. That means that they’re almost as good if only slightly worse, than humans at transcribing audio. The ball game shifts a bit when we talk about LVCSR (Large Vocabulary Continuous Speech Recognition). These applications are categorized by an extremely large vocabulary of words and fluid conversation between multiple speakers. When it comes to these scenarios, the error rate for humans is still at roughly four to five percent, while their technological counterpart measures in at roughly 8 – 10 percent. An accuracy rate of 10 percent means an error every 10 words, which is far beyond the acceptable amount. But real-world applications are much, much worse. Say you have a phone call or a voice note you’d like transcribed. The background noise can make certain words hard for the speech recognition software to detect, but that’s to be expected. In computer science terms, when you use the word “noise” you’re actually describing different elements that obscure the quality of a partic